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Inside Peg Weighting.

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This gent claims " There are only a few turns in the USA where you can weight the outside peg, otherwise it is all weighting the inside peg ".

 

 

Comments?

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He talked about using it to steer the bike "only a few turns". So, first question is, how is the bike steered, up or down, into or out of a turn? Next question is, if one is not holding onto the bike with the legs what's left to hold on with?

 

CF

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For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Pressing on the peg will push back at you with the same pressure you give it. The side with less mass move more--that's the rider. He pushes himself away from the corner.

 

Training riders by campfire stories and what they heard other people talk about is what keeps a good school in business.

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I think he's talking about anticipating the body position shift on a chicane or other tight series of corners. He doesn't do a good job of explaining how to use the handle bars in that scenario, which I think is critical, but I can see the body moving before working the handle bars on the corner change.

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The way he was moving back and forth on the bike, as he was demonstrating body position, it looked like he was showing the classic crossed up position - i.e. his hips rotated back into the bike instead of properly into the turn; and, he was leaning back into the tank with his upper body. Now, in fairness, he's on a stationary bike and someone as big as him might tip the bike off the stand if he really got in the proper position, maybe?

 

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong but I thought the peg weighting was to get your body into position and then once in position for the corner, you're trying to become a relaxed, dead weight with relatively little weight on either peg until you needed to change the attitude of the bike back upright or over. Is that right?

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Actually concerning this whole inside peg weighting, the increasing number of riders dragging their boots into the turn is something i wonder about.What are the advantages? Even MOTO3 guys like Miller do it.

 

Is it a case of monkey see monkey do, or is there some benefit?

 

cal-crutchlow-stefan-bradl-2-misano-moto48264.jpg

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Actually concerning this whole inside peg weighting, the increasing number of riders dragging their boots into the turn is something i wonder about.What are the advantages? Even MOTO3 guys like Miller do it.

 

Is it a case of monkey see monkey do, or is there some benefit?

 

 

 

I'm kinda curious about this as well.

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Watched the Valencia GP today.Hayden and Lorenzo are about the only people not doing the leg out thing.If there was some advantage to the leg out thing, wouldn't an expert dirt tracker like Hayden who would have dragged his left foot around a lot be using it?

 

Also interesting to note how Rossi keeps his foot out but close to the bike, most of them kinda halfway out, and Dovi and Crutchlow fling it out like they are trying to kick someone [ Dovi picture above ].Can someone try to make sense of this?

 

Thanks

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I think they are doing it to move weight down and to the same side of the corner, when breaking hard at the end of the straight where you don't want any steering input. It adds preload, in addition to the butt weight shift.

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Well, it's obvious that their weight is on the outside peg here leading up to the turn. Does this, in effect, act on the bike similarly to the hook turn weight shift?

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I swear I've read/heard that according to the bike telemetry, there is no change with leg out vs. keeping it on the peg. The bikes doesn't seem to care or react. So I think it's about what feels good. I believe I also read that Rossi said he doesn't know why he does it, it just feels good/right.

 

Haven't we already had this conversation :-)

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Another leg wave thread? C'mon guys... focus!

 

PEG WEIGHTING: there is no need; when you are within hard braking procedure, leave your weight on the arms only (Alex Barros said it to me, so its true) and keep your left knee barely touching the tank i.e. your arse sits as far as you can. Tip in by countersteering, and hold your body weight on the outside thigh while touching the opposite tank side with your abs. Touch your knee with the inside elbow and try to touch your shoulder with the chin.

 

That's it.

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I still thinks there is something about lowering the weight. It is obvious to me when lowering both my feet and dangling the legs while shifting my upper body forward. The bike feels more stable.

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I swear I've read/heard that according to the bike telemetry, there is no change with leg out vs. keeping it on the peg. The bikes doesn't seem to care or react. So I think it's about what feels good. I believe I also read that Rossi said he doesn't know why he does it, it just feels good/right.

 

Haven't we already had this conversation :-)

 

 

For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Pressing on the peg will push back at you with the same pressure you give it. The side with less mass move more--that's the rider. He pushes himself away from the corner.

 

Training riders by campfire stories and what they heard other people talk about is what keeps a good school in business.

 

I haven't been to this forum in a while, but hey, I'll welcome myself back.

 

It's simple Physics guys.

 

The only thing you can do with your weight when you're on top of a motorcycle is move *your* center of gravity. All this "weighting" pegs is not grounded in anything scientific. You can *support* your weight on either peg, but if your center of gravity is still in the middle, then your weight is still acting through that point. If you're COG is to the left, the bike will have a tendency to lean to the left, and vice versa.

 

Yes, you can steer the "No B.S. Bike" by leaning your body, but the faster you go (greater than 5-10 mph), the less effective "body steering" is. Which I think was the whole point of the "No B.S. Bike"--it's not meant to say that "body steering" does not exist, only as a teaching tool that the most effective way to steer a motorcycle at faster than pedestrian speeds is counter steering. As the old video shows on YouTube, you can ride with your with your weight full on one side of the motorcycle, and it will keep going straight (though it still shows the rider with their COG pretty close to the mid-line of the bike).

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