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Congratulations To Coach Laura Winning 3 Championship This Year


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Hey, thanks for noticing! And thanks for the congratulations. :)

 

I am Laura. I race with WERA, which is a national racing organization in the USA. You can find info at www.wera.com, and you can view my race record there, if you like - my race number is #641 Expert. The races are mixed men and women, but mostly men - the ratio of men to women is about 100 to 1. WERA does offer a women's class some years at some tracks but the attendance has not been all that good - but that might be partly because the class allows bikes up to 1000cc, which may keep some ladies from being willing to run in it, currently the pace in the women's race is very fast.

 

I race in the Expert classes. There are novice classes available; I started as a Novice on a 600c back in 2009 but ended up second in the points my first year so they bumped me to Expert.

 

Going for three championships this year gave me a whole new appreciation for the amount of effort and commitment required to run a whole race season; riding fast is important but just GETTING to all the races in good physical condition with a functional bike, and getting through alll the races with no DNFs or crashes, is a challenge in itself!

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Congrats Hotfoot! I saw that too. I'm way impressed, especially the no crashing part. Very inspiring for all of us but I think especially for other female riders out there. Good luck for even better success next season!

 

Cheers,

Benny

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Congratulations Laura!

 

Not only is Laura one heck of a racer she's one heck of a Superbike School coach too! How many people on the race grid can go from full speed down to a first timer's pace and have the personality skills to coach?

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Congratulations Laura!

 

Not only is Laura one heck of a racer she's one heck of a Superbike School coach too! How many people on the race grid can go from full speed down to a first timer's pace and have the personality skills to coach?

Thanks, Robert, what a nice compliment!

 

California Superbike School was my first time riding on a race track, and at that time I certainly never imagined I'd end up racing and coaching... and neither did they, I'm sure! I'm having a heck of a good time doing it, though. :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Dear Laura,

I'm so impressed that someone so personable with such humility to take on a hard headed guy as I as a project without giving clue as to just how successful you are (except that which I heard from others) is unusual at the least; I realize calling myself your project may be a stretch; I mean as I have said In past comments that I feel very supported by you knowing that you have given so many student lot's of your attention both as a coach and in the forums not to mention as moderator. Wow! That's a tremendous lot of time management and inspiring in itself. itt blows the old adage that them who can't teach to smithereens. I certainly have improved under your tutelage and hope for more. Thanks, Nic

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Laura I think you won with a very low crash record. What do you think makes it for competitive safe riding? Driving at 90% of one abilities? Focus on technique? Discipline?

Hm, that is in interesting question. It's true that I've never crashed or run off the track in a race.

 

I'd attribute that to a few things - first, a ton of education from CSS. I ride with very good technique and that translates to very good control of the bike and maximum stability and traction. Second, I pay a lot of attention to traction and if the tires aren't gripping well, I am more careful - less lean, more conservative on throttle and brakes, etc. A lot of crashes happen in poor traction conditions when riders don't realize traction has changed - like a day that has suddenly cooled down, or first lap on cold tires.

 

Another possible factor is that I am very calm when racing and riding, which means I am very consistent and not prone to making errors.. I ride within my limits and if I feel like I am on the edge of disaster I slow down or fix the thing causing he fear - usually a visual skills problem. In racing I only ride as fast as I have to, to stay in front. I try to park my ego; if someone passes me, I don't lose my head and try to suddenly ride 20% faster! That has saved me numerous times since as often as not, if someone really blasts past me in a race, they blow the next corner. :)

 

I see a lot of riders - racers included - who ride just a little over their head and they make a lot of mistakes, or get exhausted and end up slowing down due to fatigue.

 

The best way to get faster safely is learn better technique - I personally don't believe that just "pushing harder" will get you anywhere fast.

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Well done, Laura - many congratulations! I can well appreciate the amount of dedication it must have taken. Inspirational - as well as a fine advertisement for the CSS approach!

 

And thanks too for your commitment to this Forum. I make a point of reading your postings, always well reasoned and clear (the one above on 'Winning by Not Crashing' is a typical example :) ). Much appreciated - please 'Keep on Keeping On ...

 

Craig

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I was talking with my husband about the no-crashing thing - he races too and also does well in that regard - and he brought up another point. He mentioned that when he makes an error - like coming into a corner a little too fast, for example - he "owns" the mistake and adjusts his line, speed, etc. to focus on making it through the corner. He pointed out that he's seen riders make an error and go off line, but still attempt to make it without slowing down or changing what they are doing; they end up off the track or crashed, when they could have stood it up, scrubbed some speed, and still made the corner with just a little lost time.

 

Another thing that came up in the conversation was good passing decisions. He and I both plan carefully if we have to pass a rider that looks like they are pushing too hard, generally choosing to take an inside pass if possible, since if the other rider were to fall or run wide, we are much more likely to be away from where he'd go. This is mentioned in one of Keith's books, I think it's in Soft Science.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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