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Vision Advice From Ken And Nick

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Imho, this has already busted, addressed and improved upon with the wide view and 2/3 step drills. Seems as if "look sooner" is the same as the 2 step.

 

The 2 and 3 step drills address keeping your head pointed in the right direction at the right times and with wide view drill addresses the scanning aspect.

 

He mentions comfort level near the end too. I don't know about ya'lls, but the perception of speed is quite a bit different right in front of me vs. 2 markers ahead. For me, most of the time... that glance back to "where I am at now", only serves to negatively effect my riding, at pace... it's mostly too late anyway but sometimes is a necessary evil form of human checks and balances.

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It does happen that sometimes riders look TOO far ahead (probably due to the common advice to "look through the corner"), which can make the rider feel lost (losing track of their turn point, for example) or can make the rider inaccurate with the apex - for example, think of a sweeping 180 degree corner, if you look too far ahead you can end up unintentionally pointing the bike too far to the inside and have to make a steering correction to keep from running off the inside of the corner.

 

While I get the idea of the advice in the video and see how it could help a rider, I find the 2-step and 3-step drills from CSS more useful, since they VERY specifically tell you WHEN and WHERE to look, instead of just telling you to "look ahead more" or "don't look too far ahead"; statements like that are a bit vague and you hear them at track days a lot.

 

I agree with csmith that glancing back to "where I am now" negatively affects my riding; it interrupts my visual flow and slows my pace. If I have to move glance back at my turn point or apex to keep track of it, that usually tells me my visual timing was wrong - I looked ahead too early or too far, or skipped a step in my 2-step or 3-step. Following 2-step, then 3-step and ultimately wide-view gives the rider a very specific progression to nail down visual timing exactly, and ways to tell if the timing is off - which can happen to anyone when they get fatigued or distracted or are learning a new track; knowing when your visual skills aren't working and how to correct them is very important!

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It does happen that sometimes riders look TOO far ahead (probably due to the common advice to "look through the corner"), which can make the rider feel lost (losing track of their turn point, for example) or can make the rider inaccurate with the apex - for example, think of a sweeping 180 degree corner, if you look too far ahead you can end up unintentionally pointing the bike too far to the inside and have to make a steering correction to keep from running off the inside of the corner.

 

While I get the idea of the advice in the video and see how it could help a rider, I find the 2-step and 3-step drills from CSS more useful, since they VERY specifically tell you WHEN and WHERE to look, instead of just telling you to "look ahead more" or "don't look too far ahead"; statements like that are a bit vague and you hear them at track days a lot.

 

I agree with csmith that glancing back to "where I am now" negatively affects my riding; it interrupts my visual flow and slows my pace. If I have to move glance back at my turn point or apex to keep track of it, that usually tells me my visual timing was wrong - I looked ahead too early or too far, or skipped a step in my 2-step or 3-step. Following 2-step, then 3-step and ultimately wide-view gives the rider a very specific progression to nail down visual timing exactly, and ways to tell if the timing is off - which can happen to anyone when they get fatigued or distracted or are learning a new track; knowing when your visual skills aren't working and how to correct them is very important!

 

That explains alot in conjunction with the newest code break :

 

http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/less-more-visual-experiment-code-break

 

No wonder the faster I go , the more everytime I commit a mistake , the more of the $10 of attention the mistake eat into.

 

0.7s is alot , I dont look at the speedo anymore when im into a corner where i think it is high speed ; more time to buffer against mistakes and unexpected things i guess.

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http://www.motorcycl...ment-code-break

 

Perfect reference, ktk_ace. I hadn't seen this published yet, that is the perfect explanation of what glancing back and forth does to your visual flow. Keith did a ton of research. In this area, I hope he writes about it in more detail in the next book.

 

This is an excellent example of the difference between helpful advice and real technology.

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Quick post while I still unwind from a 10 hour drive, the last 3hrs ice and snow. Relax drill is wonderful even driving, just use the fingers instead of flapping your wings. Comments on the video; hmm, ok, hmmm, I'm not going to say not so polite things about another school. I may one day attend their school because there may be that one little tidbit of information that may save my bacon. Now looking to far ahead can get you lost, make you miss your apex ( Turn 2 at Barber's; run off the inside, over the curbing!!! Thanks Hotfoot for the corrective action; look at the curbing [step 2] before looking at the exit [step3]). Looking to far ahead ( Museum turn at Barber's; looking at the turn point for the S-turn and not letting the bike run out to the outside exiting; Look to the turn exit first and let the bike go there. Thanks James!)

 

If you have to look to see where you are then you are lost! By the time you know where you are, the it's old news and you are lost.

Know where you are and know where your going, if you don't then your lost; lost = slow :P

 

Back to the relax drill B) ; can't find the one for Beer so.... :D

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Quick post while I still unwind from a 10 hour drive, the last 3hrs ice and snow. Relax drill is wonderful even driving, just use the fingers instead of flapping your wings. Comments on the video; hmm, ok, hmmm, I'm not going to say not so polite things about another school. I may one day attend their school because there may be that one little tidbit of information that may save my bacon. Now looking to far ahead can get you lost, make you miss your apex ( Turn 2 at Barber's; run off the inside, over the curbing!!! Thanks Hotfoot for the corrective action; look at the curbing [step 2] before looking at the exit [step3]). Looking to far ahead ( Museum turn at Barber's; looking at the turn point for the S-turn and not letting the bike run out to the outside exiting; Look to the turn exit first and let the bike go there. Thanks James!)

 

If you have to look to see where you are then you are lost! By the time you know where you are, the it's old news and you are lost.

Know where you are and know where your going, if you don't then your lost; lost = slow :P

 

Back to the relax drill B) ; can't find the one for Beer so.... :D

 

Do tell me if you find the drill for beer! :D

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So I dug a little more into this topic.

 

I have learned the most simple of facts. We ALL have a blind spot!!!!

 

At first I didn't really believe it, but the reason was so simple. As light enters our eyes, it reflects off the back of the eye and boom sight!!!!. Thing is... the optic nerve connects back there too. No light sensitive nerves in that area is there (ie our blind spot)? Our other eye and brain compensate for this blind spot in it's twin by filling in the blanks. But what happens when the brain runs out of enough data to fill in the blanks? We move (scan) our eyes to collect more info on what we need.

 

Aint biology and science cool?

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http://www.motorcycl...ment-code-break

 

Perfect reference, ktk_ace. I hadn't seen this published yet, that is the perfect explanation of what glancing back and forth does to your visual flow. Keith did a ton of research. In this area, I hope he writes about it in more detail in the next book.

 

This is an excellent example of the difference between helpful advice and real technology.

I think I finally get Wide Vision - it's not just the opposite of tunnel vision/fixation. None of that stuff was mentioned in my Level 2 which was back in 2009 I think, or the Level 2 we sat through again during Level 3 in 2013 I think it was. i have heard of saccades before but not in relation to scanning like this.

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This Wikipedia quote should allow you to draw some conclusions of your own:

 

Saccadic masking, also known as (visual) saccadic suppression, is the phenomenon in visual perception where the brain selectively blocks visual processing during eye movements in such a way that neither the motion of the eye (and subsequent motion blur of the image) nor the gap in visual perception is noticeable to the viewer.

The phenomenon was first described by Erdmann and Dodge in 1898,[1] when it was noticed during unrelated experiments that an observer could never see the motion of their own eyes. This can easily be duplicated by looking into a mirror, and looking from one eye to another. The eyes can never be observed in motion, yet an external observer clearly sees the motion of the eyes.

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