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I was so happy to find out, today, that A Twist of the Wrist II is available on Amazon Prime Video now! You can watch it instantly, here is a link to it on Amazon Video (or you can just put A Twist of the Wrist in the search box) :

https://www.amazon.com/gp/video/detail/B089ZNVBW9/ref=atv_dp_share_cu_r

And since we're talking about the movie, what was your favorite part? I can't wait to hear what y'all liked best.

My favorite part is the CG animation and explanation of why using the front brake in a corner tends to make the bike stand up, it was BY FAR the clearest explanation I've ever seen for why that happens.

(My second favorite part is near the beginning where it shows a rider going off the road due to SR's, and explains and shows each of the Survival Reactions individually.)

How about the rest of you, what did you like seeing in the movie, or what helped you the most with your riding?

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I've got to say that the most valuable parts have changed drastically for me over the years; but my favorite parts are probably the technical demonstrations.

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Good point, same with the books - I notice every time I re-read Twist II, it looks a bit different to me - as my riding has evolved I have seen things I either didn't fully understand before OR could apply in a different way than I had before. Amazing how that works. :)

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Great to have Twist II "on tap" now for instant download. Almost time to retire the old DVD player... it is definitely getting a layer of dust on it, I watch everything on Amazon Prime or Netflix now.

 Favorite part for me - seeing the overlays of riders riding through the same corner on different lines and how that changes exit speed, very enlightening.

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There is some terrific stuff in there (and the first one too).  Maybe we should do a behind-the-scenes commentary (Hotfoot was there...) as well as the best parts to check out.

I guess I'll start: how many have looked at the footage of Will (our Chief Mechanic at the time and a very good rider) riding one of the bikes and dropping the front tire from wheelie...have you seen the frame that shows the distortion of the tire?  That to me was jaw dropping, how much the tire distorted.

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I didn't know it was Will, but I remember that frame -- huge distortion, if my memory serves it was shifted around half it's width over to the side.

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That movie changed my life. I had been riding (commuting) about 5 or 6 months when I figured I was ready to ride some twisty roads. So I went out and scared myself pretty bad. The bike wouldn't turn, I was crossing the yellow repeatedly, my wrists hurt from my death grip on the bars, etc. Every corner was terrifying; a "mild panic" as they say in the movie. It was a bad day. Then I found TOTW2 and I felt like Keith had just watched me ride and was going over my mistakes, one by one. The entire movie was a series of "ah-ha!" moments. Everything was explained so well. Now I've done a bunch of schools and I mostly ride track days. It's a slippery slope.

My favorite parts of the movie are the cheesiest parts. That's what makes it fun!

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1 hour ago, trueblue550 said:

That movie changed my life. I had been riding (commuting) about 5 or 6 months when I figured I was ready to ride some twisty roads. So I went out and scared myself pretty bad. The bike wouldn't turn, I was crossing the yellow repeatedly, my wrists hurt from my death grip on the bars, etc. Every corner was terrifying; a "mild panic" as they say in the movie. It was a bad day. Then I found TOTW2 and I felt like Keith had just watched me ride and was going over my mistakes, one by one. The entire movie was a series of "ah-ha!" moments. Everything was explained so well. Now I've done a bunch of schools and I mostly ride track days. It's a slippery slope.

My favorite parts of the movie are the cheesiest parts. That's what makes it fun!

What a great story and review of the movie, great post!

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18 hours ago, Cobie Fair said:

 Maybe we should do a behind-the-scenes commentary (Hotfoot was there...) as well as the best parts to check out.

Behind the scenes - yes, I was there and one thing that I remember was that it was SO HOT during the filming! Those scenes at Streets of Willow were like a blast furnace, the hottest days I have ever experienced out there, ever. You can see the heat ripples in the air in the film. I notice it the most during the radar-gun scenes where it shows different exit speeds based on better throttle control.

You must have some behind the scenes stories about the riders on the lean bike, demonstrating bad technique over water and sand and sliding the front tire!

I have a question - was it scary to ride the no BS bike and have someone else behind you doing the steering? :)

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11 hours ago, yakaru said:

I didn't know it was Will, but I remember that frame -- huge distortion, if my memory serves it was shifted around half it's width over to the side.

I was so proud of that shot, no one had ever showed how much distortion there was on setting down a wheelie of angle. There's so much going on that we still don't fully understand.

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Yes, riding the NO B/S Bike with  Josh Galster behind me...outright terrifying.

Let's the stage:  Josh was a pretty solid AMA Pro, racing 600 Supersport at the time, good rider.  We were on the NO B/S Bike, and came pretty close to the camera car (seemed way closer on the bike than it does in the video).  At what seemed like the last possible moment Josh would reach down with his thumb and steer the bike away from the car.  What you might not be able to see is how hard I was pressing on the NO B/S bars--surprised they didn't bend.  Veins popping out of my neck, trying to steer the bike (was sure we were gonna hit the car) I felt totally out of control

Really everyone should ride the NO B/S bike, at least once.  The little fine-tuning adjustments riders make to keep the bike pointed exactly where one wants, not even aware that they are being made,  become crystal clear when one rides that bike.  

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by the by, @Cobie Fair / @Keith Code -- any consideration to putting Twist and Twist II on Kindle? I have two paperback copies already but one that I could keep on my phone or kindle so I don't ever forget it for a track day as well as the ability to search for terms would be excellent.

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On 6/27/2020 at 7:12 PM, yakaru said:

by the by, @Cobie Fair / @Keith Code -- any consideration to putting Twist and Twist II on Kindle? I have two paperback copies already but one that I could keep on my phone or kindle so I don't ever forget it for a track day as well as the ability to search for terms would be excellent.

I'll ask!  I'm so old school, I personally don't want to read any more than I do from an electronic screen...I know, dinasour.

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On 6/18/2020 at 11:35 PM, Hotfoot said:

I was so happy to find out, today, that A Twist of the Wrist II is available on Amazon Prime Video now! You can watch it instantly, here is a link to it on Amazon Video (or you can just put A Twist of the Wrist in the search box) :

Thanks for the heads up!  

I agree that showing each of the survival reactions in turn, and the cumulative effect, with the all-too-predictable outcome (going into the scenery!) really hits home how small mistakes can add up.  This was a real "ah-haaa" moment for me and something I recognised in my own riding which is what prompted me to come to school in the first place.

Favourite part - a Harley rider, in full leathers, quick flicking it on the street!   That, and the fact that you got Julian Ryder - the voice of MotoGP - to narrate the film.

What I found most eye-opening were the overlays of the riders going through the 'esses' (one quick flicking, and the other not) and the result, not only of line but lean angle too. 

On 6/25/2020 at 11:36 PM, Cobie Fair said:

Really everyone should ride the NO B/S bike, at least once.  The little fine-tuning adjustments riders make to keep the bike pointed exactly where one wants, not even aware that they are being made,  become crystal clear when one rides that bike.

Aye!  Agree with you here. I find doing something the 'wrong' way is a good tool to learning the right way.

One of your coaches once gave me a tip to keep my non-steering hand on the tank so steering becomes purely one-handed.  Great drill!  What this highlighted that I was very right hand dominate (I am right-handed) and that my left turn was really weak and clunky. So, even when pushing with my left my right hand was doing the lion's share of pulling, which I was oblivious too.

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16 hours ago, Cobie Fair said:

I'll ask!  I'm so old school, I personally don't want to read any more than I do from an electronic screen...I know, dinasour.

I'd rather read from an electronic screen than not have access to it at all :D

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On ‎6‎/‎27‎/‎2020 at 7:12 PM, yakaru said:

by the by, @Cobie Fair / @Keith Code -- any consideration to putting Twist and Twist II on Kindle? I have two paperback copies already but one that I could keep on my phone or kindle so I don't ever forget it for a track day as well as the ability to search for terms would be excellent.

I have the Kindle edition, here is a link for Twist II for Kindle:

https://www.amazon.com/Twist-Wrist-II-High-Performance-Motorcycle-ebook/dp/B00F8IN5K6

and here is a link for A Twist of the Wrist (Twist I), it is available on Kindle also:

https://www.amazon.com/Twist-Wrist-Motorcycle-Racers-Handbook-ebook/dp/B00BNFIU08/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1593622442&sr=1-2

I love having these, because I can search for a word of phrase electronically to go right to the info I want. And it's great to be able to pull up the books on my iPhone Kindle App, at the track or wherever I might be.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 6/22/2020 at 6:33 PM, Cobie Fair said:

There is some terrific stuff in there (and the first one too).  Maybe we should do a behind-the-scenes commentary (Hotfoot was there...) as well as the best parts to check out.

I guess I'll start: how many have looked at the footage of Will (our Chief Mechanic at the time and a very good rider) riding one of the bikes and dropping the front tire from wheelie...have you seen the frame that shows the distortion of the tire?  That to me was jaw dropping, how much the tire distorted.

I'm glad to have watched the twist 2 video as you sometimes come across bad advice online i.e. releasing the clutch slowly on downshifts, or the bike's rear squatting on acceleration...

Anyway, as a side note, I came across this video from 2010 of Will doing clutchless downshifts on the first gen S1000RR, and way before auto blipper.

Clutch hand: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9ExUQYu0-k 

Throttle hand: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5afgz9ZebLI

Another unrelated thing I found interesting in this video was how high the forks were in the triple clamp and how little preload was being used.  The preload adjuster is all the way out.  Joys of the first gen S1000; lots of experimenting.

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7 hours ago, bashir0505 said:

Anyway, as a side note, I came across this video from 2010 of Will doing clutchless downshifts on the first gen S1000RR, and way before auto blipper.

Off topic but Keith is still chastising me for using my clutch on my smaller bikes (without any electronics past fuel injection); I've done clutchless up and down on them a few but I've missed enough that I still haven't gotten confident doing it by default. I may also be biased because my transmission ended up needing work done on the subsequent track day after spending a school attempting to get used to being clutchless.

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23 hours ago, bashir0505 said:

I'm glad to have watched the twist 2 video as you sometimes come across bad advice online i.e. releasing the clutch slowly on downshifts, or the bike's rear squatting on acceleration...

Anyway, as a side note, I came across this video from 2010 of Will doing clutchless downshifts on the first gen S1000RR, and way before auto blipper.

Clutch hand: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9ExUQYu0-k 

Throttle hand: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5afgz9ZebLI

Another unrelated thing I found interesting in this video was how high the forks were in the triple clamp and how little preload was being used.  The preload adjuster is all the way out.  Joys of the first gen S1000; lots of experimenting.

Very cool, I had forgotten all about that, thanks for posting up the link so others can see it.

I think on those first bikes they ended up raising the rear to get the desired balance, not dropping the front. Yes, there was a lot of experimenting, for sure!

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16 hours ago, yakaru said:

Off topic but Keith is still chastising me for using my clutch on my smaller bikes (without any electronics past fuel injection); I've done clutchless up and down on them a few but I've missed enough that I still haven't gotten confident doing it by default. I may also be biased because my transmission ended up needing work done on the subsequent track day after spending a school attempting to get used to being clutchless.

Wait until Cobie realizes it, he more or less forced me to learn to do it. :). But once I started I never stopped, I really like it, it is so much quicker and generally has less drama than trying to use the clutch, because you eliminate that possibility of holding the clutch a little too long on a downshift and having the revs drop too far and then sliding the tire as you let it out. I have not had any transmission problems - I was definitely worried that I would, but I never did. I do it on every bike  - the Z125, the dirt bike, the race bike. All the bikes I have right now shift REALLY easily clutchless, but there was one bike I had that was tougher, the ZX6R was always harder to shift clutchless and I never did know why. My one caveat is this - sometimes when shifting down to first I do use the clutch, because that is the hardest one to rev-match, and/or you can accidentally get a false neutral and those are scary. (Clutchless doesn't, as far as I can tell, increase the incidence of false neutrals, but if I DO get one I seem to recover faster when I used the clutch to shift, because I am quicker to pull it back in and upshift, it is hard to get a clutchless upshift under that condition because the revs fall off so quick, it is very clunky.) 

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