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Steering pressure


lebedo
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Hi there,

As said before, I'm a riding instructor. One thing confuses me when I teach countersteering. Students have to ride a slalom in third gear, 25 mph, constant speed, and countersteer around some plots. When they add pressure on the inside bar, the bike steers, that's ok. But when they release the pressure, the bike stands up. Is it related to the body position, the constant speed, some kind of increase in the speed? Any thought on this? Has someone already experienced this? 

Also, do you think that countersteering at slow speed can be done? 

Thanks and have a good day.

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Hi Keith,

I'm sorry for the delay to your question. I am not working for now but will in December if the lockdown is over in France, in a driving/riding school named "auto ecole Plan Benjamin" in Aubenas, a small town in Ardeche. I'm an instructor since 1994. The reasons I'm asking for that is not to steal your work, it's just that everything you say and do, everything you teach, is right. When I passed my riding license, nobody explained me how to countersteer, how to brake, how to lock my body,etc. When I look at the way we teach our students how to ride, I realize that most of us, instructors, teach it the wrong way. And sometimes we don't know how to help students. I'm asking because I want to teach the good techniques to my students. You can have a look at "plateau moto 2020", "Trajectoire de sécurité", or AFDM and you'll have an idea of how it's done here. So, if you don't want to answer, I will understand, but let me tell you that you are doing a great job.

Thanks and have a good day.

 

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Lebedo;

I wasn't worried about you stealing my stuff, everything in the books and videos is for riders to improve themselves, if you see better ways to instruct from the books and videos and you see it helping your students, I'm happy about that.

The bike should not stand up once pressure is released after the counter-steering pressure is applied. If the rider is crossed up as you illustrate in the photo then it WILL have the tendency to stand up. This is possible.

Also, riders often restrain the bars with the opposite hand e.g., press the right bar to turn right but their left arm is stiff holding on to the left bar. They could be pushing or pulling on the left bar. If they are pushing on it the bike will stand up.

When you instruct counter-steering you always look at both arms. The negative effects on handling from being too tight on the bars is well covered in" A Twist of the Wrist II"

Keith

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  • 9 months later...

Hi guys, i m new here. I have read some posts in this forum about the countersteering and i have understand that the turn speed rate depends on how hard you push/pull/both on the handbars, not how quickly. What is not clear for me is how to control the lean angle amount, does it depend on how long the pressure Is applied on the handbars? 

For examole if i apply a little pressure for a long time will i reach the max lean angle X of the motorcycle but with a low speed turn rate, and if i apply a hard pressure i ll reach the same lean angle X in less time, right?

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Hi guys, I try to answer on my own, maybe someone can validate my sentences.

The lean angle amount to reach from the motorcycle stand up position is function of how much the handbars is rotated by the force applied (pushing force)

For example with a pushing force of 10 kg we reach lean angle of 30 degree

The speed to reach 30 degree, instead, depends on how quickly we apply 10kg on the handbars.

 

I hope in some feedbacks

 

 

 

 

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On 8/24/2021 at 6:47 AM, Jump said:

Hi guys, i m new here. I have read some posts in this forum about the countersteering and i have understand that the turn speed rate depends on how hard you push/pull/both on the handbars, not how quickly. What is not clear for me is how to control the lean angle amount, does it depend on how long the pressure Is applied on the handbars? 

For examole if i apply a little pressure for a long time will i reach the max lean angle X of the motorcycle but with a low speed turn rate, and if i apply a hard pressure i ll reach the same lean angle X in less time, right?

Yes, the amount of lean angle will depend on how LONG you push on the bar, and the steering rate (how quickly the bike leans over) will depend on how HARD you push. And your last sentence is stating it correctly, yes.

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Hi Hotfoot i trust you, but for me it Is a bit strange. I throught that the lean angle had depend on how much the handbars is rotated by the pushing force.

I mean  with a pushing force on the handbars of 10 kg the handbars rotates of 2 degree and the motorcycle reach the 30 degree lean angle for example and so on. 

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38 minutes ago, Jump said:

Hi Hotfoot i trust you, but for me it Is a bit strange. I throught that the lean angle had depend on how much the handbars is rotated by the pushing force.

I mean  with a pushing force on the handbars of 10 kg the handbars rotates of 2 degree and the motorcycle reach the 30 degree lean angle for example and so on. 

I don't claim to know this for a fact, but my first thought is this:  countersteering takes the front wheel out of line with the direction of travel, creating the lean, and that creates resistance and some temporary deformation of the tire, and that if you try to push the bar quickly (but without increasing the force) the tire just sort of bounces back at you and you get a wobble instead of a real direction change, whereas a STRONGER push really turns the bars and creates a larger force at the contact patch to lean the bike over rapidly. That's my thought, but I'll try to get a more technical answer for you from the boss. :)

The main thing we are trying to avoid is riders trying to "punch" at the bar, because that creates instability and a wobble in the steering. That is easy to test, go out and ride and try a very light (low force), controlled push on the bar and see how the bike steers. Then try a much firmer push with similar control (harder but not faster). Then try a very quick, low force stab at the bar (faster but nor harder) and see what happens. Which gives you a faster and more controlled steering result?

When you try this, make sure you are going at a decent speed, over 25 mph, so that you don't accidentally oversteer and lean too far -  it takes a lot less force to lean the bike over a very slow speeds so that makes the whole exercise of playing around with the steering more difficult.

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