Jump to content

Steering Transition


Bones
 Share

Recommended Posts

Firstly; this is still ?counter-steering? just with a slight twist.

 

This transition works especially well when you need to steer the bike after hard braking (ie: a hairpin after a long straight).

 

I use the pressure of my arms on the handlebars from braking, to pre-load the pressure I want to use to counter-steer for the corner (any excessive pressure to what I need is shifted to the legs).

 

As I get to my turning point, I release the brake and I also release the pressure on the outside handlebar, which now leaves pressure only on the inside handlebar (counter-steering). So basically I don?t press the inside handlebar, I release the pressure on the outside handlebar to steer.

 

Stand facing a table about 2 feet in distance, then lean and place your hands on the table about shoulder width apart. Allow your body weight to rest on both hands; it should feel a bit like braking. Now just release the pressure from one of the hands. You?ll notice that there is now twice as much pressure on the other hand.

 

You can?t totally eliminate the pressure on the handlebars when you?re braking hard, so you might as well make use of it.

 

Enjoy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
Firstly; this is still ?counter-steering? just with a slight twist.

 

This transition works especially well when you need to steer the bike after hard braking (ie: a hairpin after a long straight).

 

I use the pressure of my arms on the handlebars from braking, to pre-load the pressure I want to use to counter-steer for the corner (any excessive pressure to what I need is shifted to the legs).

 

As I get to my turning point, I release the brake and I also release the pressure on the outside handlebar, which now leaves pressure only on the inside handlebar (counter-steering). So basically I don?t press the inside handlebar, I release the pressure on the outside handlebar to steer.

 

Enjoy!

Have you ever tried holding your body up with your back and releasing all the weight off the bars?

If you can do it the bike will calm down and stay straight on the brakes but you will be back to plain old CSing then.

Will

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Will,

 

Have to agree. Under normal braking, my goal is to completely remove/reduce the braking force from the handle bars.

 

There are only a few corners that I use this steering transition (it is still the old CS). At Phillip Island, from turn 3 (240+kph) to turn 4 (90-100 kph) is an extreme braking approach. Also from Lukey Heights at MG corner as well.

 

Possibly you could use it at turn 11 at Laguna Seca? :) Give it a go, I'm interested in your feedback.

 

Cheers

Paul

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Will,

 

Have to agree. Under normal braking, my goal is to completely remove/reduce the braking force from the handle bars.

 

There are only a few corners that I use this steering transition (it is still the old CS). At Phillip Island, from turn 3 (240+kph) to turn 4 (90-100 kph) is an extreme braking approach. Also from Lukey Heights at MG corner as well.

 

Possibly you could use it at turn 11 at Laguna Seca? :) Give it a go, I'm interested in your feedback.

 

Cheers

Paul

Well one area were I don't spend much attention is turning. I can turn the bike faster than the frame and suspension can coop with. It's not an area I will change in my riding.

I will tell you that I am push/pull turner. I use both hands. I usually don't have any weight on the bars at the time I turn, just the steering input. For me if I don't remove the weight before the steering input I can't let go of the bars soon enough after it.

Will

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...