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The World Plan


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In The Soft Science of Road Racing Motorcycles the World Plan is described as the minimum requirement to compete at the top level. Has this changed since the book was published in 86 or is the World Plan still the most precise riding style developed?

 

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Well whats the point of the top guys going out and pushing the boundaries if we are not going to learn from them. Do we out of some sense of unworthiness not allow ourselves to aim for the same standards, sure many will not get to the top level but why not be on the current best path to improvement.

 

P.S. My world domination plans are on hold right now :P

 

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Okay, so I haven't read the book so I can't comment directly to the plans of conquering the world as such. But what I can offer is my opinion (dispensed free of charge).

 

Racing is much like the laws of physics. They very rarely change (if ever). However, the way they are applied constantly changes.

 

With that in mind, stop to consider that racing can be broken down into extremely basic elements (such as Keith has done). Master them and you're well on your way to global domination. To master them, one needs to recognize, understand, practice, perfect and ultimately engrain these elements as reaction. From there, a person can build on them based on further understanding of the more complex elements.

 

Now I've done much commenting of basic elements and some of advanced elements. So what are they? Well, ask Keith... I don't know them all (but hope to learn more soon). In my opinion, some of the most basic elements are:

 

Braking

Accelleration

Cornering

Reaction time

Response time

 

Truly the top 3 comprise motorcycle racing at is most basic stage.

 

Looking at advanced elements brings us to things like

Traction

Suspension

Geometry

Metaphysical awareness

 

So what's my point? Well, the fact is that racing equipment has changed but the concept and result still remain the same. On top of all this is the fact that the largest limiting factor in racing is the rider's mental condition (again, IMHO). Put a nervous, insecure wreck on Hayden's RC211V and he'll get smoked by a confident and comfortable rider on a clapped out EX-500 with flat tires...

 

But hey... that's just my opinion.

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My experience may be relevant on this question. I stopped racing in 92 and though I rode the technology progressed far greater than I could have imagined. When I came back and started trying to go fast all my parameters were off, calculated to the traction and handling I had in 92.

it took me the better part of two years to get close to what my 99 ZX9 could do. When I got my 636 I had to go though the same processes once more, it took only a few months to go faster on the 636 than I had on the ZX9. And now after almost a year on the 636 I am starting to push the limits of the bike instead of just mine.

 

My point is that any rider from any era would be just as fast compared to other guys. The ability to find the limits of what the bike is capable of is what separates the men from the boys in our game, and it is as it was and will be. the individual is what makes the speed from his willingness to do it.

Will

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My point is that any rider from any era would be just as fast compared to other guys. The ability to find the limits of what the bike is capable of is what separates the men from the boys in our game, and it is as it was and will be. the individual is what makes the speed from his willingness to do it.

Will

Amen!

 

People often times switch bikes in hopes of this dramatic change in lap times only to find they are struggling to stay at the times they were at before! It does take time and adjustment. It's part of that whole man/machine relationship thing...

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My experience may be relevant on this question. I stopped racing in 92 and though I rode the technology progressed far greater than I could have imagined. When I came back and started trying to go fast all my parameters were off, calculated to the traction and handling I had in 92.

it took me the better part of two years to get close to what my 99 ZX9 could do. When I got my 636 I had to go though the same processes once more, it took only a few months to go faster on the 636 than I had on the ZX9. And now after almost a year on the 636 I am starting to push the limits of the bike instead of just mine.

 

My point is that any rider from any era would be just as fast compared to other guys. The ability to find the limits of what the bike is capable of is what separates the men from the boys in our game, and it is as it was and will be. the individual is what makes the speed from his willingness to do it.

Will

Well thanks Will I guess the world plan would be a good base and then the rider needs to put in the time, effort and thinking to get the most out of the new machinery, especially the traction and handling from what you are saying.

 

I guess when I get back on a racebike it will take a bit to get back near the limits. When you were riding in 92 were you as fast(comparatively speaking) as you are now?

 

How much practice do you think is neccessary for good linear(roughly of course) improvement up to competitive national level and then for maintanence? Schwantz reckons he needed weekly practice to stay at the peak for GP.

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[

Well thanks Will I guess the world plan would be a good base and then the rider needs to put in the time, effort and thinking to get the most out of the new machinery, especially the traction and handling from what you are saying.

 

I guess when I get back on a racebike it will take a bit to get back near the limits. When you were riding in 92 were you as fast(comparatively speaking) as you are now?

 

How much practice do you think is neccessary for good linear(roughly of course) improvement up to competitive national level and then for maintanence? Schwantz reckons he needed weekly practice to stay at the peak for GP.

When I raced before I was way more aggressive and would push past the edge of control. I didn't crash much, three times in three years. I sure had a lot more almost crashes than I have now.

The older I get the faster I was has been my thought until this year. I am at least as fast as I was though much more controlled and skilled.

All the top guys ride every day they can. Racing consistently has been what brought my speed up.

Will

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