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PittsDriver

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Posts posted by PittsDriver

  1. Wes,

     

     

     

    See if you can find a real Pilates coach who has experience and all the Pilates equipment. I've found it very helpful not only for us old farts but for young, up and coming riders as well.

     

    Keith

     

     

     

    I've just started something called PiYo with my wife where it's a combination of Pilates and Yoga but I may need a coach when it gets tough. I'm just getting back at this since racing my 20's and I'm 56 now. I'm going to be working pretty hard this winter to set the stage for 2015 and I'm using that as my motivator.

     

    Thanks Keith!

     

    Wes

  2. Hehe....any other " Bucket List " tracks?

     

    CoTA for me in addition to Laguna Seca. I went to the Barber museum last summer but didn't get on the track. I'm really looking forward to getting back there for the CSS camp. The place looks pristine with vast areas of kitty litter and some interesting elevation changes. And one of these days, I hope to get some time on the Nurburgring long course before it goes away.

  3. Last winter, I did daily workouts on a Bosu ball. The balance training is good for the core and a zillion squats moving side to side on this thing left me feeling pretty good after my first couple of days in CSS camp but even still my quads were barking at me.

     

    Thanks for the tips!

     

    squats.png

  4. It's my understanding that CSS Level 3 focuses on BP work - I'm really looking forward to a couple of days at Barber working on this.

     

    Being an old coot, I'm wondering if anyone has a flexibility and conditioning program that will help me get the most out of this coaching?

     

    Wes

  5.  

    A question about camps in the fall - how soon do they tend to fill up? I'm going to do some additional classes in the fall but not sure yet if I'll do another CSS camp or Code RACE. Just wondering when I should jump on the reservation for fall ops.

    CodeRace fills up really early.

     

     

     

    Thanks! When it fills up do they sometimes add additional dates? This past year they offered a Code RACE in NJ which would be a lot closer for me and I thought I remembered some additional dates popping up on the schedule later in the year but maybe that was for the CSS camp/classes.

  6. I asked Cobie about this at my level 1&2 camp because at the time they were planning to have a Code RACE at NJMP not too far from me. The main take-aways I got from that conversation were that there was a baseline set of skills needed and but that it's more about what you want to do? Are you feeling the need to test your skills against something other than a clock?

     

    I'm hoping Cobie or others will chime in here too. My plan for next year is to go back to a level 3/4 camp at Barber and then decide if more level 4 days are in my future or Code RACE in the fall (or both). I'm thinking I'll likely be a repeat offender at the level 4 days after that - at least until they get tired of seeing me. I really like the class/camp program that CSS offers.

  7. I'm now remembering why the school bikes seemed to turn in better than mine. Their fork heights are set to the 4th line. Mine are on the 2nd. That's quite a difference in the front. Both are supposedly stock. Hmm. I have a 2013 and they had 2014 bikes. Could they have really changed that that much?

     

    There was no change between '13 and '14 that would have affected handling. The '15 is a new bike with different geometry.

  8. Not so sure I agree with you there. How many other bikes have an active suspension as advanced as BMW's DDC? There are others but how many of them are able to adapt to in real time 100x a second? Heck for that matter how many of them have active suspensions at all? :)

    DDC is far from outdated. On the HP4 it was BMW allowing the world to see a glimpse of the future.

     

    Judging from the Ducati 2015 product launch, they seem to have taken a step beyond BMW's DDC - if it works. The DDC reacts to what it feels is happening to the suspension without any consideration to what the rider is doing to the bike (braking hard, accelerating, turning in, etc). The Ducati system is reported to be event based (derived from their MotoGP technology) and takes into account that the rider is on the brakes hard and proactively adjusts the suspension instead of reacting to the result of hard braking. That was the gist of it that I gleaned from the announcements. If it works will it be better? Who knows - they seem to think so. I'm looking forward to the supersport shootout articles comparing the new R1, H2, BMW, and 1299 Panigale. I love all this new competition and looking forward to some good times ahead!

  9. Actually concerning this whole inside peg weighting, the increasing number of riders dragging their boots into the turn is something i wonder about.What are the advantages? Even MOTO3 guys like Miller do it.

     

    Is it a case of monkey see monkey do, or is there some benefit?

     

     

     

    I'm kinda curious about this as well.

  10. The way he was moving back and forth on the bike, as he was demonstrating body position, it looked like he was showing the classic crossed up position - i.e. his hips rotated back into the bike instead of properly into the turn; and, he was leaning back into the tank with his upper body. Now, in fairness, he's on a stationary bike and someone as big as him might tip the bike off the stand if he really got in the proper position, maybe?

     

    Somebody correct me if I'm wrong but I thought the peg weighting was to get your body into position and then once in position for the corner, you're trying to become a relaxed, dead weight with relatively little weight on either peg until you needed to change the attitude of the bike back upright or over. Is that right?

  11.  

     

    Wes

    While what you are describing DOES work, the school mechanic Will, who knows these bikes extraordinarily well, says it is hard on the transmission to pre-load the sifter and he does not recommend it. So you might want to work towards getting the blip and shift into one motion that does not include preloading the lever, just for the sake of longevity of your transmission.

     

    Sounds like you have the skill mostly under control, but if you are having trouble getting the braking while blipping consistent, I'd suggest finding a big safe parking lot area and breaking it down into steps for practice. Practice blipping and downshifting, without brakes, in a straight line. Then when consistent, move up to doing two downshifts per run, then three (if you have room). When that feels really comfortable and consistent, go back to one shift per run and add light braking, then more aggressive braking, then multiple shifts, or whatever gradient feels comfortable for you. I think you will get a lot more out of isolating the parts of this skill and practicing in a straight line with no other distractions than you can get trying to practice on a racetrack or road, with turns and traction and other riders, etc. to think about.

     

    If you have the opportunity to come to a school you can have a coach work with you on this specific skill in an off-track drill. :)

     

     

    That's exactly the feedback I was looking for. I was wondering if this was hard on the transmission and it sounds like it can be if the shifter pressure is not closely correlated with the blip. I'm definitely coming back to a camp next spring for level 3-4 but you've given me a drill I can work on for this in the mean time to get more consistent with the brakes. Thanks!

     

    BMW is making available on the '15 bikes a shift-assist that includes the blipper for clutch less downshifts. I guess at some point in the future when the school upgrades it's bikes, some thought will have to go in to if this is available of the student bikes. I can see arguments both ways for having/not having it available since a lot of students will be going back to their own bikes that don't have blippers.

  12. YellowDuck, this is how I do it - and I'm happy to get critical feedback if I could do this better:

     

    I stab the brakes and start slowing the bike down at my breaking marker. Then as the bike slows I preload the shift lever enough so that when I blip the throttle, it snicks into the lower gear and because I'm on the throttle a bit, it matches revs (more or less) with the speed. The tranny is loaded initially by the engine braking and by preloading the shifter just prior to the blip, it's set to shift when the blip unloads it from the engine braking. It works like a charm on the S1000RR though as I said earlier in this thread, I'm still working on holding firm and consistent brake pressure when I blip. I'll sometimes release the brake a bit for the blip and I end up slowing more erratically than constantly. This doesn't happen every time for me but often enough that I was starting to think about going back to the clutch especially when I want to drop 3 - 4 gears like when coming off a long straight into a hairpin.

     

    All of my downshifts in this video that I posted in another thread are clutch less:

    http://youtu.be/lX0pxXMDF5g?list=UU1QkXTbxY9px_OVg0BX8Hig

     

    What I'm hearing Hotfoot say is to just keep working on my blipping technique until I iron out the occasional glitches I'm having. Have I got that right?

     

    Wes

  13. Hi PittsDriver,

     

    I'm glad to hear you were able to break the cheek pads in - and even more glad that you went with the smaller size L and not the "instantly comfortable" XL. While it does take longer than some other helmets to break in an SR1, the snug fit is what you want and a too loose helmet will never tighten up.

     

    That said, another tip for breaking in a brand new helmet is to remove the cheek pads (and crown liner if necessary) and wash them - that will help soften them up a bit faster. Also, I've heard stories of people taking the cheekpads out and sitting on them at their desk for a day - funny but effective. Enjoy your SR1!

     

    Sarah

     

    Thanks for that tip Sarah! I've been using it almost exclusively for my local rides and it's now the most comfortable and quiet helmet I own - most likely because I bought my last two helmets in the "instantly comfortable" aisle of the helmet store. There are kids on the S1000RR forum that are complaining about noise and I've been giving this hat my rave reviews for aerodynamics and acoustics.

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