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Bar Inputs, Etc.


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Now I realize that even the slightest push gets the bike leaning. As to pivot steering, I had read about it in TotW II, but had kind of discarded it, as it seems at odds with other things I've read. For example, Ienatsch talks about weighting the inside peg to initiate a turn. But now that I'm comfortable putting very little weight on the bar, I'm going to experiment with it some more.

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:)

 

I think you are on the right track in terms of grip pressure. In my experience, a lighter grip pressure seems to "unlock" some of the arm tension and "free up" some arm power.. ...which should translate into more efficient steering.

 

Another power-booster idea:

 

If you think about it, the angle at which you press the grips (in an effort to turn the bike or even just to track along in a straight line) can really be anything from horizontal (a straight line parallel with the triple tree) to vertical (a straight line perpindicular to the triple tree, in other words "straight down").

 

Now if we hold to the "horizontal wheel" idea from the other thread, we know that a horizontal push on the grip will be the most efficient...

 

And a vertical one will be the least efficient. You can prove this for yourself with this experiment: Ride along in a straight line at a moderate pace. Now take your hands off the grips, make fists out of them, and then rotate the fists so that your thumbs are 'up' (like they'd be if you were holding a pistol in each hand. Now replace your hands on the bars so that your hands are resting in that same gun-position on top of the grips (not wrapped around 'em). Now try to steer the bike by pressing straight down on the grip of your choice. Does the bike lean or steer at all? The quick answer is no. Not one bit.

 

Although you might hear it said from time to time, one does not steer a bike by pressing down on the grip. It is done pressing forward (or pulling backward).

 

In reality I think most riders find themselves exerting pressure on the grips at some angle between horizontal and vertical.. ..and the vertical percentage of the pressure.. ..the pressure you are using to "hold yourself up" by the grips.. ..is generally the percentage you are not able to apply to efficient and powerful steering. Now of course something else has to take up your weight if you aren't using your hands and wrists.. ..and this is where the rest of your body (and its' placement) comes into play.

 

Now that you have the physical awareness of your grip pressure you can experiment with your arm angle too. Just try a series of weaves on a straight section of road and see which arm position/angle yeilds the best steering performance. Somewhere along the way you'll likely find a comfortable seating position/arm angle that works well on the straights and the twisties.

 

Some not-so-obvious things may contribute to your arm angle. While riding along in a straight line, skootch your ass back a few inches towards the back of the bike; do you feel a change in the pressure on your wrists? you might. <_<

 

I'll ramble on and on about peg weighting later :lol: Maybe someone with a little more qualifications will step in and lend his advice? :D

 

-Trevor

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Trevor,

 

YOu could have shortened that up and said, "look at page 76 in Twist of the Wrist, Vol II", it covers the point pretty well.

 

Keith

:lol:

 

I would've if I still had the book to reference! My copy has been lent from buddy to buddy to buddy so many times that I can't remember who has it now!

 

-Trevor

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Trevor,

My simple advice is to get another copy and then pick up the other two. IMHO, if you really want to become a better rider, at a minimum you need to have these books to refer to as you place more attention on technique and mental attitude necessary to improve.

 

I have read, re-read and re-read all three books and each time I do, there is always something that I missed or something that was a particular barrier for me at the time that I find the answer to in these books. These are reference books - I would bet that you don't lend out your repair manual for very long, why would you do that with your riding manuals?

 

Kevin

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I'm definitely familiar with page 76 of TotW II, and I've taken it to heart after realizing just how much I was countermanding my own steering inputs without even knowing it. Now my bike's in the shop for routine service, and they're waiting for a part to come in. It's driving me nuts!

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Now I realize that even the slightest push gets the bike leaning. As to pivot steering, I had read about it in TotW II, but had kind of discarded it, as it seems at odds with other things I've read. For example, Ienatsch talks about weighting the inside peg to initiate a turn. But now that I'm comfortable putting very little weight on the bar, I'm going to experiment with it some more.

 

Pivot steering is just a way to get the steering force into the bike from you body at a better anchor point, the peg. The reason it is going to be the outside peg is that is the best flow of force through your body. It's not that you are weighting the peg but just using it as the point of anchor.

 

I weight the inside entering turns but it has absolutely nothing to do steering the bike. The inside peg is right under the center of mass of my body and is the best balance point for the weight. In fact I have the inside peg weighted in the straight while I am on the brakes.

Will

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