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Inside Arms During Turns


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Hello Everyone

 

A bit confused on the "inside" arm position.

I know it steers but i am also wondering what is the positon of that arm?

Should the elbow of the inside arm be tucked in and down which i would think would conserve energy or does it stick out more horizontal?

 

Thank you for all your suggestions

 

B

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Hello Everyone

 

A bit confused on the "inside" arm position.

I know it steers but i am also wondering what is the positon of that arm?

Should the elbow of the inside arm be tucked in and down which i would think would conserve energy or does it stick out more horizontal?

 

Thank you for all your suggestions

 

B

 

Riders choice. The key is to have it relaxed after your steering input. That's what conserves the most energy and allows the bike to do its thing.

 

Most riders you'll see have their arms outside of their knee. What happened to me is that I found, when something caused a "panic" in me, that I'd tuck my elbow inside my knee to make my steering input to correct whatever problem I'd encountered. I've since changed it so my elbow is inside of my knee.

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Hello Everyone

 

A bit confused on the "inside" arm position.

I know it steers but i am also wondering what is the positon of that arm?

Should the elbow of the inside arm be tucked in and down which i would think would conserve energy or does it stick out more horizontal?

 

Thank you for all your suggestions

 

B

 

Riders choice. The key is to have it relaxed after your steering input. That's what conserves the most energy and allows the bike to do its thing.

 

Most riders you'll see have their arms outside of their knee. What happened to me is that I found, when something caused a "panic" in me, that I'd tuck my elbow inside my knee to make my steering input to correct whatever problem I'd encountered. I've since changed it so my elbow is inside of my knee.

 

Thank you so much for that advice Jasonzilla...

When you say "inside the knee",.. does the inside elbow sort of drop down ?

Is your inside knee fanned open out in the direction of the turn?

 

Thanks again for any advice...

 

B

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Hello Everyone

 

A bit confused on the "inside" arm position.

I know it steers but i am also wondering what is the positon of that arm?

Should the elbow of the inside arm be tucked in and down which i would think would conserve energy or does it stick out more horizontal?

 

Thank you for all your suggestions

 

B

 

Riders choice. The key is to have it relaxed after your steering input. That's what conserves the most energy and allows the bike to do its thing.

 

Most riders you'll see have their arms outside of their knee. What happened to me is that I found, when something caused a "panic" in me, that I'd tuck my elbow inside my knee to make my steering input to correct whatever problem I'd encountered. I've since changed it so my elbow is inside of my knee.

 

Thank you so much for that advice Jasonzilla...

When you say "inside the knee",.. does the inside elbow sort of drop down ?

Is your inside knee fanned open out in the direction of the turn?

 

Thanks again for any advice...

 

B

 

 

My inside elbow rests on the inside of my knee if I'm that far over. I'm tall with long arms, so it doesn't take much to get far enough over for that to happen. If not, it's just tucked in by the tank with my shoulders dropped to make sure I push the bars to turn the bike if any small corrections are needed. I have a post somewhere around here that talks about what new stuff I'm doing with my shoulders. I just drop them. The elbows follow. In a turn I'm actually laying on the tank. I try not to drag my knees so much because pucks aren't free, so my inside knee is usually tucked in by the bike as well. Otherwise I just let it hang a little to monitor for clearance. There are some riders in GP who don't really use their knees as a guide for lean depth very much. Rossi is one of them. He knows his machines so well that when his knee touches the ground he's at his limit.

 

Lorenzo tucks his elbow in and is the only pro rider I've seen who does it as part of his style.

 

Jorge-Lorenzo-03.jpg

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Thanks again Jasonzilla

Now i understand much better the concept. I was also thinking of Lorenzo because i thought he was tucking his inside elbow in.You know ,.. if the Moto GP "champ" does it ,.. maybe i should try it?

Great explanation ..

 

Best

B

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Nothing further to add other than I'll try to keep mine pointing down, but making sure it's loose. That is a fantastic photo!

 

 

Outer leg is always pivot steering and outer arm is loose and relaxed , laying on the tank i presume... ?

Do you find opening out the inside leg to point , helps also in every turn?

 

Thanks and sorry for all the questions ...

 

B

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I've mentioned it elsewhere on the forums, but I've got my street riding style where my butt stays on the seat, and a track riding style where I can't walk the day after... To answer your question though, yes I tend to be quite close to the tank, I've got my outer arm resting on the tank for support and my outer leg locked in to the tank, haven't done level 3 yet, so haven't really had much of a go at pivot steering, too busy concentrating on everything else at the moment!

 

I tend to open my inside leg out as far as it'll go, mainly because I'm still at the stage where dragging my knee results in a big grin, not sure if it helps anything else in the turn, but it certainly helps me realise when I'm getting to the limit of the lean-angle available to me. In a hairpin I'll quick turn until it touches down and then loosen my pressure on the bars whilst cracking on the throttle, the knee touching down is useful there as it's another indicator that my steering input is complete and that I can start cracking open the throttle.

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