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Body Position While Cornering


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Just curious how you guys sit when cornering. Specifically I would like to know if you have your crotch touching the tank or if you are pushed back and your butt is touching the rear seat. I've always pushed back as far as I could. But last weekend I had a low side, not sure if body position was the cause. But then I looked carefully at some pictures of fast guys and they are much closer to the tank. Any thought?

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Be careful comparing yourself with top racers, most of whom are not much bigger than Jockeys. If, like me, you are 6'1" and 17 stone, you will almost always appear to be sitting further back on the bike. Bikes also make a big difference. On an R6 my backside is almost always flush against the back of the seat pad, but on the R1 it isn't. Different shaped tanks and seating positions. However, I almost never have my crotch against the tank. Think about how uncomfortable it feels and how hard it is to move around.

 

The trick is to get comfortable and stable on the bike. If you aren't the chances are that you will provide unneeded or incorrect inputs to the bike (such as stalling on the gas or inside bar pressure) which can help contribute to a low side. Either way, eating bitumen is a real bummer. How's the bike?

 

Cheers,

 

Isaac.

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As far back and comfortable as possible. Knee to the tank has more leverage than inner thigh to the tank. I just finished Level 3 and that's what I gather and so I tried to sit as far back with the knee to the tank but I find myself sliding forward a bit (inner thigh to tank) towards end of the day/exhausted. The stomp grips help a lot with regard to side tank traction :)

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I would think that you would want to be as far forward as possible. Having more of your weight would allow you to get more throttle on to get the 60% weight rear/40% front. This is what I've been shown by other racers. I have no idea how CSS would teach it because I have yet to take one of their schools. I hope to change that very soon though.

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Ok here is the deal... When riding into the corner, you should be ready in your body position already, before the corner, to not disturb the stability of the bike. After entering the corner your body position does not have to do with being forward or back on the seat because we are all different sizes. So, just as the other css student has said, your knee should be in the tank. But more so then that, you should be able to hold onto the bike with your outside leg, with your knee in the tank and a good grip with your toe on the peg you should almost be able to let go of you hands and take your inside leg off, when on the kickstand. This is a good trick, sit on the bike on the kickstand, get a good knee in the gusset of the tank and a good grip on the peg. Get your torso low, where all the weight in your body is, and try to put as little weight on your inside leg as possible. That is the position you should be in until you start to pick the bike back up.

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Here is the problem I see with trying to be back. When you are setting up for a corner most always you are just popping up and braking for all you're worth. The front dives and you are pushed into the tank naturally. So in order to be back on the seat, you either have to push yourself away from the tank by using your arms (on the handle bar, which is bad news) or somehow be strong enough to pinch the tank with your knees to prevent you from going forward in the first place. That's the problem I see. It might be easier to just let yourself slip towards the tank as you are braking, so maybe that's why most riders are close to the tank. What do you think?

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  • 2 weeks later...

I had confusion about body position/braking/into the turn issues that I was able to address during level 4 at Blackhawk Farms two weeks ago. My coach has me setting-up my butt position before braking. Even though I'm asymetric to the tank, clamping tightly with the knees during braking keeps me positioned. This seems to work well for me.

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Here is the problem I see with trying to be back. When you are setting up for a corner most always you are just popping up and braking for all you're worth. The front dives and you are pushed into the tank naturally. So in order to be back on the seat, you either have to push yourself away from the tank by using your arms (on the handle bar, which is bad news) or somehow be strong enough to pinch the tank with your knees to prevent you from going forward in the first place. That's the problem I see. It might be easier to just let yourself slip towards the tank as you are braking, so maybe that's why most riders are close to the tank. What do you think?

But I seem to have a problem holding to my seat just by letting my inner thigh and groin slip to the tank. As I'm almost being lifted up due to the braking, any way to rectify this problem?

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So that's what those things are called - Stomp pads. They do make all the difference. Heavy jeans or leathers are needed though. The other day I rode my ZX6R (bought it from Will several weeks ago) to work in dress pants. My inner knees got knobbied to death. :lol:

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