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Hook Turn


Hammer
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I have heard this spoken about a couple of times at Track Days

 

What is a hook turn, how is it done and what are the benefits, it must be good because it helped Luthi to his win at Phillip island recently

 

Any advice would be appreciated

 

Hammer :huh::unsure:<_<

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Hi JeF4y

 

Thanks for the advice I have only just turn Level 1 at Silverstone but no more schools until next year when I plan to do Level 2,3 & then a 2 day camp to do Level 4

 

So I'll have to wait til next year for Level 3

 

Hammer :D:D

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Hammer,

If your going to do a two day camp anyway - you might want to consider combining Levels II & III in the two day camp and leave your level IV commitment until you have finished the core curriculum (Levels I, II & III).

 

I found that the Level II & III drills flowed together much more seamlessly when done on consecutive days and I was able to apply the techniques more progressively; the other reason for utilizing the two day camp for Levels II & III is track time. You get one more track sessions (6 v. 5) over the regular School plus the sessions are longer (2 groups v. 3) so you get far more attention learning these drills. The kicker has to be that the two day camp includes multiple video sessions; now you get to see first hand how you look applying these skills.

 

The final reason is as I suggested above. Any subsequent school(s) you attend for Level IV allows you to focus on areas that you want to address (or re-address); Level IV is where you fine tune any or all of what you learned in the three previous levels. I did Levels II & III in the two day camp and it was da bomb!

 

Good Luck,

Kevin

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  • 4 weeks later...

A hook, also called "Backing it in" is going in way hot, chopping the throttle and slamming the bike to max lean simultaneously then gapping it wide open to break the rear end loose. It hooks around and you G out of the turn with a wheelie. I've done this a time or two but, it was unintentional. I just got lucky. To do it on purpose is a very advanced technique. As you can probably tell by the description, If the timing is not perfect,things can go horribly wrong in an instant.

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The final reason is as I suggested above. Any subsequent school(s) you attend for Level IV allows you to focus on areas that you want to address (or re-address); Level IV is where you fine tune any or all of what you learned in the three previous levels. I did Levels II & III in the two day camp and it was da bomb!

 

Good Luck,

Kevin

Hi Kevin,

 

I took your advice and I'm now booked on the 2 day camp at Almeria in April, just can't wait for it to come round.

 

Winter is just too long for us bikers although I still ride in winter months it's no where near as enjoyable although it does help with smoothness and throttle control. :blink::blink:

 

:lol::lol:

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A hook, also called "Backing it in" is going in way hot, chopping the throttle and slamming the bike to max lean simultaneously then gapping it wide open to break the rear end loose. It hooks around and you G out of the turn with a wheelie. I've done this a time or two but, it was unintentional. I just got lucky. To do it on purpose is a very advanced technique. As you can probably tell by the description, If the timing is not perfect,things can go horribly wrong in an instant.

Whooooaa, won't be trying that technique in a hurry, think it's best I wait to be taught it.

 

Must admit though I have already slid into a corner by going into hot and didn't go down, just got lucky I suppose.

 

Can't wait to learn some more technique's though the search for skill and knowledge must go on and on ;)

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Superdave,

 

A hook, also called "Backing it in" is going in way hot, chopping the throttle and slamming the bike to max lean simultaneously then gapping it wide open to break the rear end loose. It hooks around and you G out of the turn with a wheelie.

 

I am just curious, where did you learn this technique?

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Learned technique? HAH! It was an accident. Or I guess I could say "It was almost an accident." I read about it somewhere. I just did it one night on the way home from a friends house (No witnesses of course). But, when I told my riding buddies aabout it they didn't believe me and asked if I could do it again. I did it 4 times the next time we all got together. I haven't done it since and don't plan to. Very dangerous! I touched the frame slider and clipon to the ground and brought it back up. Crazy man!

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Superdave88.

 

For purpose of discussion, the term "Hook Turn" was really referring to a Keith Code defined Hook Turn, which I can assure you (and everyone), is *NOT* related to 'backing it in'.

 

Book a level III and you'll understand a CSS Hook Turn.

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For purpose of discussion, the term "Hook Turn" was really referring to a Keith Code defined Hook Turn, which I can assure you (and everyone), is *NOT* related to 'backing it in'.

 

Book a level III and you'll understand a CSS Hook Turn.

JeF4y,

 

Already took yours and Kevin Kane's advice and I'm booked on 2 day camp in Almeria in April next year, just getting fed up waiting for it to come around.

 

Oh how I hate winter :(

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