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When I see the top riders at every level in particular I thinking about AMA, I see very different

body positions on the bike from rider to rider, several riders have very different body positions, and are

very fast, The rider that comes to mind is the one who has elbows out, not down. Mr S.

 

I see some riders with the lower body hanging off with the upper body centered more over the tank.

 

It seems to me that many different body positions will work.

 

From my own experience being on the tall side 5 11, I find some of the riding positions to be impossible

to get into on my 600RR.

 

How does one find the best body position for one's size?

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When I see the top riders at every level in particular I thinking about AMA, I see very different

body positions on the bike from rider to rider, several riders have very different body positions, and are

very fast, The rider that comes to mind is the one who has elbows out, not down. Mr S.

 

I see some riders with the lower body hanging off with the upper body centered more over the tank.

 

It seems to me that many different body positions will work.

 

From my own experience being on the tall side 5 11, I find some of the riding positions to be impossible

to get into on my 600RR.

 

How does one find the best body position for one's size?

 

tfc600

 

Good obseravation--different riders look different on the bikes. Just as each of us walks a little different we tend to sit on the bike the way it feels best to us. Some riders do lots of stretching exercises, some look stiff, some relaxed.

 

5'11" isn't too tall at all to ride a 600 so don't worry about that part of it.

 

One thing you want to be aware of is the basic idea of why riders hang off and when you look at someone you can make a simple decision based on that.

 

The basic idea is to lower the combined center of gravity of the bik and the riders body mass which can only be done by bringing the body off the inside of the bike, this, among other things allows for less lean in the corners.

 

If they have their butts way off the seat but their upper body is countering that by being across the tank in the opposite direction they are not getting the full benefits of hanging off.

 

Instead of getting their weight to the inside of the bike their torso mass is countering that and they may be worse off than if they just sat up straight on the bike.

 

Use that as your guide and you can't go wrong if you are trying to learn hanging off.

 

Ben Spies "Elbows" rides like that because it is comfortable. try it yourself and see what it feels like. Try other body positions as well to see what they feel like, it is quite fun to mimic what a pro rider does on the bike and you can learn something about different body positions.

 

All of our Level III is based on this but we start setting you up at Level II on the "Lean Bike" which is when we work out the basics of how to do it best and fit you onto the bike.

 

Keith

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That is very good input, thank you.

 

I did try different positions this weekend, and found that for me pushing back in the

seat, and getting very low with my chest on the tank was best, this put my arms

on the tank in a relaxed position, it seemed very easy to move around the bike, the

bike felt very stable, and I had very little weight on my wrists.

 

Again looking at the AMA riders I noticed some of them put thier weight over the front of the tank

well forward, but I cannot do that, and keep my arms low.

 

With my wieght back would that not reduce the turn in, and the grip on the front end?

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I see the top riders at every level in particular I thinking about AMA, I see very different

body positions on the bike from rider to rider, several riders have very different body positions, and are

very fast, The rider that comes to mind is the one who has elbows out, not down. Mr S.

 

I see some riders with the lower body hanging off with the upper body centered more over the tank.

 

It seems to me that many different body positions will work.

 

From my own experience being on the tall side 5 11, I find some of the riding positions to be impossible

to get into on my 600RR.

 

How does one find the best body position for one's size?

 

tfc600

 

Good obseravation--different riders look different on the bikes. Just as each of us walks a little different we tend to sit on the bike the way it feels best to us. Some riders do lots of stretching exercises, some look stiff, some relaxed.

 

5'11" isn't too tall at all to ride a 600 so don't worry about that part of it.

 

One thing you want to be aware of is the basic idea of why riders hang off and when you look at someone you can make a simple decision based on that.

 

The basic idea is to lower the combined center of gravity of the bik and the riders body mass which can only be done by bringing the body off the inside of the bike, this, among other things allows for less lean in the corners.

 

If they have their butts way off the seat but their upper body is countering that by being across the tank in the opposite direction they are not getting the full benefits of hanging off.

 

Instead of getting their weight to the inside of the bike their torso mass is countering that and they may be worse off than if they just sat up straight on the bike.

 

Use that as your guide and you can't go wrong if you are trying to learn hanging off.

 

Ben Spies "Elbows" rides like that because it is comfortable. try it yourself and see what it feels like. Try other body positions as well to see what they feel like, it is quite fun to mimic what a pro rider does on the bike and you can learn something about different body positions.

 

All of our Level III is based on this but we start setting you up at Level II on the "Lean Bike" which is when we work out the basics of how to do it best and fit you onto the bike.

 

Keith

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You want your weight more forward and over the front of the bike to keep the front end from pushing. You should be able to find a position that gets you there. I am 6'1 almost 6'2 and I have no problem riding my 2006 r6 in such a manner so your height is fine. Im not saying it will work for you, but what works for me is to obviously jam my inner thigh right up again the tank and hold on with my leg and I get my chest really low to the tank on the side I am turning making sure my head is over the side and bury my forearm (the one opposing the turning direction) into the tank for support. If I want I can remove both hands from the clip ons and stay on just fine using my leg and forearm. You shouldn’t really have any weight on the wrists while you are leaned off as you want to give as little input possible to the front end after your initial counter seer or before while braking for that matter.

Hope this help.... Im no expert but I do ride :)

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That is very good input, thank you.

 

I did try different positions this weekend, and found that for me pushing back in the

seat, and getting very low with my chest on the tank was best, this put my arms

on the tank in a relaxed position, it seemed very easy to move around the bike, the

bike felt very stable, and I had very little weight on my wrists.

 

Again looking at the AMA riders I noticed some of them put thier weight over the front of the tank

well forward, but I cannot do that, and keep my arms low.

 

With my wieght back would that not reduce the turn in, and the grip on the front end?

 

Thanks.

 

 

Up to a point the bike can be adjusted to give you a good turn in even with your butt full back in the seat.

There are pros and cons and other approaches to the problem. Your reason for being back in the seat, "because it is comfortable" is one of the most valid reasons there is. Also, most riders sit up close to the tank so they can get a better, firmer grip on the bars which we know is a bad thing.

 

One other point is that sitting back in the seat helps riders to relax on the bike. A good thing.

 

The idea of where your weight is and what effect it creates on the bike and the idea of the bike "hooking" into turns is covered several different ways in Twist II. The "hook" is mentioned on page 59/

 

Keith

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Thank you very much for your suggestion in trying different body positions.

 

It's eactly as you say, when I am back in the seat it feels as if one is connected to the bike,

very stable feeling, with the fingers almost just resting on the controls, as one makes

a corner it is easy to just slip the body to the inside of the coner, and the upper body

moves to the inside naturally, the bike almost falls into the corner with very little effort.

I am gradually increasing my lean angle, my main concern now is that I think my pegs

will touch down before my knee touches the ground, I have heard that the pegs drag on the

CBR600RR early, I get the feeling that I should move my inside foot up and back to move it out

of the way. I need to come to see you at the school, at Firebird PHX.

 

Thanks very much Keith.

 

 

That is very good input, thank you.

 

I did try different positions this weekend, and found that for me pushing back in the

seat, and getting very low with my chest on the tank was best, this put my arms

on the tank in a relaxed position, it seemed very easy to move around the bike, the

bike felt very stable, and I had very little weight on my wrists.

 

Again looking at the AMA riders I noticed some of them put thier weight over the front of the tank

well forward, but I cannot do that, and keep my arms low.

 

With my wieght back would that not reduce the turn in, and the grip on the front end?

 

Thanks.

 

 

Up to a point the bike can be adjusted to give you a good turn in even with your butt full back in the seat.

There are pros and cons and other approaches to the problem. Your reason for being back in the seat, "because it is comfortable" is one of the most valid reasons there is. Also, most riders sit up close to the tank so they can get a better, firmer grip on the bars which we know is a bad thing.

 

One other point is that sitting back in the seat helps riders to relax on the bike. A good thing.

 

The idea of where your weight is and what effect it creates on the bike and the idea of the bike "hooking" into turns is covered several different ways in Twist II. The "hook" is mentioned on page 59/

 

Keith

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