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Hello there, quick couple of points. Whilst looking at other forums i hear alot of stories about other people binning their bike. I cant afford to to hire one and i would prefer to learn more about my bike anyway but hearing these stories makes me worry a little. Do your techniques push rider and bike (when rider has little expierence riding...1 year) to the point where this is a real hazard.

Also, alot of the people i go riding with leave me behind because of their wealth of expierence riding. Would it benifit me first doing a few track days before doing level one. I know level one is for people like myself but would having trackday expience help me before doing level 1. All i wanna do is learn and get better safer and faster so which way round should i be doing this.

Many thanks

Mike wearn

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Hey mike,

 

Glad to have you on the forum. Excellent question.

Riding your bike hard enough to catch "more experienced" riders is a disaster waiting to happen. You are wise to let them go. Crashing is expensive and can be hazarous to your health, especially on canyon roads. The best way to learn, in that respect, is to learn from someone elses mistakes. ;)

 

All coaches are trained to observe and work within the student's personal limits. Your coach will push you to improve, but only within your riding abilities. Believe it or not, there are riding indicators that tell your coach how close your are to riding over your head and "binning" your bike.

 

ALL students start at level one. Do not confuse level one as a beginner level. Level one is the first level in the CSS program. Even top professionals atteneding the school start at level one. In fact some will return to certain drills in level one after going through the entire program. So basicly, no matter what your skill level is, the drills apply to everyone. First time track rider or a seasoned professional.

 

Your concern of never riding on a track should be dismissed. Most of our level one students have never been on a race track and we are aware of how nervous this can be. You will not be alone.

 

And to answer your question regarding a track prior to attenteding the school.

You could attend a track day prior to a school, but wouldnt you rather attend the school and use the track day improve what you learned? Not to mention smoking all your friends on the racetrack? ;)

 

 

Hope to see you out there.

 

JR

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Hi there again, thanks for the quick reply. It certainly made sense. It would be better first to learn basic techniques and get them right rather than correcting my own to start with-if that makes sense. Plus i would rather spend my own cash praticing what i have learnt rather than preparing myself incorrectly. sounds confusing but im sure you can understand it on some level.

Its good to know that your coaches can look out for when peolple are nearing their limits so as to give them a guiding hand to harness their skills correctly. Although as i said before i know of a few stories of people coming off their bikes doing these techniques that you teach. As each incident is due to its own particular reason its impossible to say what may of caused them but as you can understand there is always a worry that praticing these techniques may result in coming off. But.... no one said it was gonna be easy and there are always risks to riding a bike. Especially when learning new things and pushing yourself a little.

However i will be booking level one in the next couple of days, the course set up and instruction sounds great and i just want to get get better so in my opinion there is no better place to learn.

And as for riding with my friends. one silly time i tried to keep up. My own riding went to bits, looking at the bike in front of me rather than concentrating on the road and my bike and what i should be doing. all the survival reactions what Twist of the wrist 2 talks about, i was doing every one of them. Never again.

Anyway, see you all soon, looking forward to it and thanks for the warm welcome.

be safe

mike

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Mike,

 

Good decision. I went to my first CSS at Watkins Glen a year after I bought my first sport bike and it was the best decision I could have made about motorcycling. I had self taught myself how to ride a motorcycle back in my teens and with a street bike, I got away with it; learning how to ride a sportbike is not the same.

From my observation as a multi-time CSS Student and now as a CSS Corner Worker, there is no better environment to learn how to corner a motorcycle than CSS.

 

Kevin

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Hi there again, thanks for the quick reply. It certainly made sense. It would be better first to learn basic techniques and get them right rather than correcting my own to start with-if that makes sense. Plus i would rather spend my own cash praticing what i have learnt rather than preparing myself incorrectly. sounds confusing but im sure you can understand it on some level.

Its good to know that your coaches can look out for when peolple are nearing their limits so as to give them a guiding hand to harness their skills correctly. Although as i said before i know of a few stories of people coming off their bikes doing these techniques that you teach. As each incident is due to its own particular reason its impossible to say what may of caused them but as you can understand there is always a worry that praticing these techniques may result in coming off. But.... no one said it was gonna be easy and there are always risks to riding a bike. Especially when learning new things and pushing yourself a little.

However i will be booking level one in the next couple of days, the course set up and instruction sounds great and i just want to get get better so in my opinion there is no better place to learn.

And as for riding with my friends. one silly time i tried to keep up. My own riding went to bits, looking at the bike in front of me rather than concentrating on the road and my bike and what i should be doing. all the survival reactions what Twist of the wrist 2 talks about, i was doing every one of them. Never again.

Anyway, see you all soon, looking forward to it and thanks for the warm welcome.

be safe

mike

 

Well I'm not gonna tell you we dont have crashes, because we do. Very few considering the amout of miles put in, but no the less. However, MOST crashes happen when students ride over their heads and not focus on the drills at a speed for which they are comfortable with. If you stay within your limits and truely focus on the drills you WILL be going faster by the end of the day with alot LESS effort. We guarantee it. ;)

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I have let sportbike riding become a passion for me and I really don't see myself stopping any time soon. I joined NESBA and have been to 3 track days so far. Everytime I go out I do feel like I am improving but I looked at it this way.....IF I am going to continue my quest to become a better rider then I need to learn the correct way to do it. At track days you can get some feed back but most of the control riders are helping out other riders and just keeping an overall eye on everyone so your "time alone" with someone giving you tips is limited.

 

I can't wait to attend my level 1 and 2 school this weekend!!! I have been waiting for months and it is finally here. I was really hoping for some cooler weather, not the 100 degree days that will be there, but oh well. I just gotta stay hydrated.

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