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The Pace


Jaybird180
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I've read a few places that keeping a rhythm is important. At the CSS school it is recommended that a student go (IIRC) 7/10ths pace to get the most out of the drills, lessons, etc.

 

Although we know when we're exceeding it, how would you describe or define "the pace"? Specifically what would be changed (technique-wise) to adjust one's pace?

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At the CSS school it is recommended that a student go (IIRC) 7/10ths pace to get the most out of the drills, lessons, etc.

JB;

That's not been my experience at the School EXCEPT when riding their video (mast arm) bike. Do you remember what Level this was taught at?

Kevin

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When I did level 1 we were told to ride at about 85% of our normal pace to allow yourself to free up attention for practicing the drills set out for you, You must remember that it is a school and not a trackday, but that does not mean circulating slowly. You can ride as fast as you want as long as your doing your specific drills, if your not your only wasting your money and your instructors time. In my experience by the end of one day 85% for me was way faster than what 100% would have been at the beginning of the day, if that makes sense!

At a few points throughout the day my instructor was encouraging me to do things faster, quick steer there faster, get on the gas a bit harder through there etc, etc,

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I haven't been to a school in over 4 years, but I'm with the others Kevin. It is suggested that you ride at 85% to get the most out of the day.

 

At times it was introduced as the $10 of attention.

 

Personally, I felt it was one of the best points of the school. It's not how fast you go, but; Are you able to apply what you learn in the classroom.

 

Cheers

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I haven't been to a school in over 4 years, but I'm with the others Kevin. It is suggested that you ride at 85% to get the most out of the day.

 

At times it was introduced as the $10 of attention.

 

Personally, I felt it was one of the best points of the school. It's not how fast you go, but; Are you able to apply what you learn in the classroom.

 

Cheers

Bones and Ace et al;

Guys, I don't take issue with the idea of running at 85% to insure that our focus is on all of the drills that day. I honestly never heard it before. I first took Levels I, 2 & 3 in 2001/2 but did a bunch of Level 4's since then. I decided to retake all four levels and re-did 1 at Infineon in November and will retake 2 and 3 at Infineon in March but back in November, I still didn't hear it...but it's OK...honest. It's me who is hard of hearing.

 

BTW, if you have been away for a few years, it is eye opening to revisit the program. My regret was waiting too long to return.

 

Kevin

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...it is eye opening to revisit the program. My regret was waiting too long to return.

 

Kevin

Also, the intro to T2 pg XIV (14) has 75%

 

Although we know when we're exceeding it, how would you describe or define "the pace"? Specifically what would be changed (technique-wise) to adjust one's pace?

Anyone want to tackle these?

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Although we know when we're exceeding it, how would you describe or define "the pace"? Specifically what would be changed (technique-wise) to adjust one's pace?

 

Anyone want to tackle these?

 

To clarify, you're asking how I increase my pace from say 85% to 95%, etc .. then to 100% ?

 

 

 

Kevin, chances are I heard it a few times, and as it worked so well for me, I've applied it to my riding. "If you can't apply the drill at 85%, what are your chances of applying it at 100%?" These could be Keith Code quotes, I don't know anymore. Too many schools, and studied the TOTW books too much, I don't remember the original source. But I do know that Keith has taught me (through the school and TOTW books) 99% of what I try to apply to my riding. :)

 

Cheers

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I haven't been to a school in over 4 years, but I'm with the others Kevin. It is suggested that you ride at 85% to get the most out of the day.

 

At times it was introduced as the $10 of attention.

 

Personally, I felt it was one of the best points of the school. It's not how fast you go, but; Are you able to apply what you learn in the classroom.

 

Cheers

Bones and Ace et al;

Guys, I don't take issue with the idea of running at 85% to insure that our focus is on all of the drills that day. I honestly never heard it before. I first took Levels I, 2 & 3 in 2001/2 but did a bunch of Level 4's since then. I decided to retake all four levels and re-did 1 at Infineon in November and will retake 2 and 3 at Infineon in March but back in November, I still didn't hear it...but it's OK...honest. It's me who is hard of hearing.

 

BTW, if you have been away for a few years, it is eye opening to revisit the program. My regret was waiting too long to return.

 

Kevin

 

 

Hi Kevin

The question was asked by a student at the end of my first classroom session- How fast should we go? Andy Ibbot answered jokingly by saying how fast do you want to go with no brakes, then went on to say that riding at 80-85% is good to free up attention to work on the drills! But perhaps if that student hadn't asked the question then we wouldn't have been told that!

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...it is eye opening to revisit the program. My regret was waiting too long to return.

 

Kevin

Also, the intro to T2 pg XIV (14) has 75%

 

Although we know when we're exceeding it, how would you describe or define "the pace"? Specifically what would be changed (technique-wise) to adjust one's pace?

Anyone want to tackle these?

 

Not sure if I uderstand your question jay, but will give it a shot,

What is 100% to you? for me it is as fast as I can go but then me at 100% is probably the equivalent to a racer warming their tyres, so it is clearly very different for everyone. specifically what I change technique wise to adjust my pace is to try to eliminate the most attention sapping aspects of the lap, I think rather than thinking of it as reducing your pace you should think of it as more freeing up attention, in a learning environment you dont have to go max speed down the straights, nor do you have to late brake for the turn, thats why I like the no brakes drill so much as all of my attention becomes focused on the corner, and I can increase my entry speed gradually every lap comfortably. So to answer your question for me to reduce pace I dont brake so much, how ironic is that slowing down my pace by not using the one thing that will slow me down lol!

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