Jump to content

Traxxion Dynamics Shock Upgrade


Recommended Posts

I recently sent out my OEM 2006 Kawasaki ZX-10R rear shock to Traxxion Dynamics to get it re-valved and re-sprung. I received it back yesterday and they did an excellent job cleaning it up and making it look brand new. Hopefully i'll be able to get it installed this weekend.

 

They also included a Shock Dyno chart and I was hoping someone on here may be able to translate this thing for me because it makes no sense to me :)

 

Here is the link to the dyno chart:

http://employees.demosales.net/shockdyno.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I recently sent out my OEM 2006 Kawasaki ZX-10R rear shock to Traxxion Dynamics to get it re-valved and re-sprung. I received it back yesterday and they did an excellent job cleaning it up and making it look brand new. Hopefully i'll be able to get it installed this weekend.

 

They also included a Shock Dyno chart and I was hoping someone on here may be able to translate this thing for me because it makes no sense to me :)

 

Here is the link to the dyno chart:

http://employees.demosales.net/shockdyno.jpg

 

I could barely even read it. I'll see if Mike or Will want to (or have the time) to look at this.

 

CF

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I recently sent out my OEM 2006 Kawasaki ZX-10R rear shock to Traxxion Dynamics to get it re-valved and re-sprung. I received it back yesterday and they did an excellent job cleaning it up and making it look brand new. Hopefully i'll be able to get it installed this weekend.

 

They also included a Shock Dyno chart and I was hoping someone on here may be able to translate this thing for me because it makes no sense to me :)

 

Here is the link to the dyno chart:

http://employees.demosales.net/shockdyno.jpg

 

I could barely even read it. I'll see if Mike or Will want to (or have the time) to look at this.

 

CF

Thanks. I am just curious to know what it all means :)

Although i think it roughly translates to "your shock works better now". :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey vio,

 

What this chart means is that the damping characteristics are very linear, which in a nutshell is what you want. The sharper the bump you hit, the more damping the shock provides, which ultimitely helps keep the tire in contact with the road. Also, there is a ratio of 1:3 compression:rebound damping. This ratio is a hotly debated topic, and will vary based on the ratio of sprung/unsprung mass, and the demands you are putting on the bike.

 

However, understand that you are only looking at the "low speed" to "mid speed" damping characteristics of the shock. Low speed damping means that the rate that the shock is compressing (measure in in/sec) is not very high, which in the real world would correspond to small bumps and undulating road surfaces. Pot hole type bumps which create much more velocity in the suspension and can easily reach rates of up to 25in/sec, and at that rate the damping characteristics may change drastically based upon piston and valving design.

 

What you see on your chart looks great "on paper," and this is how engineers design suspension, based on what they see on a shock dyno. In real world applications damping rates may need to be altered slightly to work optimally for a specific bike or track. But, this is a great place to start from. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey vio,

 

What this chart means is that the damping characteristics are very linear, which in a nutshell is what you want. The sharper the bump you hit, the more damping the shock provides, which ultimitely helps keep the tire in contact with the road. Also, there is a ratio of 1:3 compression:rebound damping. This ratio is a hotly debated topic, and will vary based on the ratio of sprung/unsprung mass, and the demands you are putting on the bike.

 

However, understand that you are only looking at the "low speed" to "mid speed" damping characteristics of the shock. Low speed damping means that the rate that the shock is compressing (measure in in/sec) is not very high, which in the real world would correspond to small bumps and undulating road surfaces. Pot hole type bumps which create much more velocity in the suspension and can easily reach rates of up to 25in/sec, and at that rate the damping characteristics may change drastically based upon piston and valving design.

 

What you see on your chart looks great "on paper," and this is how engineers design suspension, based on what they see on a shock dyno. In real world applications damping rates may need to be altered slightly to work optimally for a specific bike or track. But, this is a great place to start from. :)

Thanks for taking the time to explain the chart. I really appreciate it!

 

Rode the bike for the first time today and the shock feels great so far. Can't wait to take it to the track :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...