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I'm registered for an August class at Pocono, and I'm exceptionally excited about it! Along with this also comes some nervousness... be honest, guys, how do you perceive female students? I tend to underestimate myself, and even though I have 5 years of riding experience, I still don't want to look like a joonja! <_< How many women are typically in the classes? I have kind of figured, though, that we'd be concentrating so much on what we're doing, that we'll hardly notice who else is out there. Regardless, I can't wait, and look forward to learning and improving.

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No distinction based on gender. Everyone gets instruction and encouragement tailored to their particular skill level regardless of who they are or what their chromosome component is.

In my humble experience the female students tend to listen a little better and are often easier to bring along, therefore. With 5 years experience of riding you will be able to do the drills without difficulty and will be in possession of more experience than many. All you have to do is listen and apply what Keith asks you to do. Easy! That really is all there is to it.

 

You will have the broadest smile at the end of day 1- no bull.

 

Numbers of females are variable- couldnt begin to quote you a % but you will not be alone. I would guess at 5-10% - maybe?

 

PS What's a joonja?

 

JR

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Thank you for your input, johnny! I'm counting the days till the class. And by the way, "joonja" is a Lithuanian slang word my mother always uses, so it seems like a "normal" word to me. The easiest description of its meaning would be "goofball" :rolleyes: Lisa

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I attended a class last summer at Barber and I had one lady in my group. I think she had a better time than anyone. She passed me ont track one time and all I thought was you go girl. The school has lady instructors and they can ride. Myself, I think that it is pretty cool that women want to ride, and I do not think that anyone would not want a lady in the class. If they did thats their problem. I do not think that being able to ride has anything to do with being a man or a woman. It is not a sport about brute strength, I feel that it is more mental. Just go, once you put on that helmet no one can tell anyway.

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The CSS events I've attended at Watkins Glen and Pocono usually had women riders...all of them fit in all of them could ride. CSS women instructors are also no different; they know how to ride and they know how to instruct.

 

I think JohnnyRobshaw is right..."You will have the broadest smile at the end of day 1- no bull"

 

Kevin

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Thank you all for your input. My smile started the day I registered, so I can only imagine what it will be like the day of the class! Kevin, please do tell me more about Pocono. I drove a road course there at a Corvette event, but I'm curious as to what the track is like for a bike... tight curves? Sweeping curves? Lots of curves? Long straights? Pavement smooth or rough? Thanks!

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You can find Pocono's layout on the School's web site but look for the East Course on the track map as all of the different classes I've attended with CSS at Pocono have been on the East Course. I've been to Pocono East about a half a dozen times and anytime I saw cars, they were almost always on the North Course so If you have driven the track in a Corvette, it was probably the North Course.

 

Pocono East is flat with tons of run off room but the trade off is reference points are harder to find. It doesn't matter however because the School addresses reference points very effectively - but only after Session 1 has ended.

 

The East Course is 1.7 miles long with 11 turns running through the infield but does incorporates a portion of the tri-oval's straight section. That section is the only place where you can stretch your legs.

 

A modification that the school made last fall (but not last spring) was to add a chicane at the end of the straight I mentioned above. It adds another turn to the mix but also keeps the WFO crowd inside the school yard so to speak.

 

The pavement is not as smooth as Watkins Glen but the only noticable bumps are at the braking sections of the Bus Stop, a 180 degree right hand turn located right in the middle of the layout. Otherwise, it's a tight, fun track that will hold your attention and give you plenty of opportunities to work on your cornering skills.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Kevin

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