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mha
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Aloha All,

I surf alot and in surfing a beginner newbie is called a Kook, Hodaddy, Gremmie and that's basically what I am. I figure gas will be $4.00 a gallon by next year (it's 3.27 @ gal. now). My daily commute to my office is about 6 miles one way or 12 miles all together and using my truck costs me about $100.00 a month and climbing. SO! I'm planing on getting a motorcycle to commute to and from my office. I'm going to take my beginner rider course this October and pickup a Kawasaki Ninja 250r. Yes I've looked around and did my homework and by far I've found this bike to fit me and my beginner status. It's one of the only bikes that I can actually straddle and have my feet planted on the ground I'm 5'-3" tall. Now that you've all stopped laughing, don't worry I'm used to it I'm seriously thinking of attending your school. I've always had a philosophy of learning and mastering a skill if I'm getting into it. I'm a former High School State Champion wrestler, Active Surfer, Avid spearfisher/Freediver, practiced martial arts most of my life, active High school wrestling coach, amature chef, never aquired a talent for musical insturments but god knows I've tried. So I'm thinking of attending your school while it's in Las Vegas since it's alot closer and travel expense and time will be cheaper. I'm 52 yrs. old, you know my height, my weight about 140 lbs. and in realitively good health. No heart problems, No high blood pressure, No diabetes or Hypertension. I surf almost everyday, and freedive on the weekends and practice and coach wrestling everyday while in season run 2-3 miles a day, don't smoke, no drugs, drink socialy only.

 

My reason for attending your school would be to gain experience in control and confidence in riding. I feel that by going to this school and learning all the techniques it will make me a better street rider. I'm not supid to go racing on the freeway or city streets but feel that with these racing and extreem techniques it would help me be a better safer rider able to get out of situations and become more actively aware of my suroundings or potential hazardous situations ahead and around me. I'd like to eventually get to a point where I'm confident and have the nessecary skills to race on the track, not to compete but be competent to do so. This is the level I'd like to finally master and acquire do you all think this is a good idea or is my wife correct and blaming all this on a midlife crisis? Instructors please respond I'd like your opinion please, thanks,

Muhaha

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So, you've spent the last 52 years not riding motorcycles? Well, now it's time to LIVE! :rolleyes:

 

Mid-life crisis or not being competent at something is the only way to do it. My favorite student was 74 and had started riding 4 months earlier. So, you're not too late. You're not too early. Come on and PLAY!

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Your age is irrelevant... people do THINGS in the first 3rd, middle 3rd and last 3rd of their lives. Why assign special value to one vs. the others? You are obviously interested in motorcycles and nobody on this site is going argue with that. Welcome to one of the most fun activities life has to offer! There's inherent risk of course, but you can cut down on it greatly with proper instruction so... see you on the track!

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Muhaha,

 

I'm 49 and my mid-life crisis started about 40 years ago, so I'm not worried about that point.

 

I still street ride when I can (not often with kids to transport), and enjoy it. For sure the info trained at the school will apply to almost any type of riding that you do, street, track, etc. The Twist books will give you some very good idea of what we cover, especially Twist 2.

 

Level 1 and level 2 really helped me with my street riding, made it easier, less drama, more fun. Track riding is excellent, aside from being just fun, it's a great way to practice the skills in an environment that is distraction free (no cops, cars, etc., etc.). I recommend getting on the track a least once or more year to keep "tuned up."

 

OK, my opinion is totally biased, but there you go!

 

Best,

Cobie

 

ps--let us know what you do.

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Hey thanks guys! I feel alot better now, yea I'm going to pick up the two books can you please give me the complete titles? You guys made me feel so good that while sitting in the lineup waiting for waves yesterday evening all I could think about was picking up my bike and getting experienced so I can take the class next year. I know it will take me a good 6 months to pick up and be confident in basic riding skills but still I'm so excitied. I still respect my mom, wife, brother, sister and friend and their comments about it being dangerous or destructive, but your comments have also inspired me. Hope my equiment gets here before my riders class.

Muhaha.

 

:lol:

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Hey thanks guys! I feel alot better now, yea I'm going to pick up the two books can you please give me the complete titles? You guys made me feel so good that while sitting in the lineup waiting for waves yesterday evening all I could think about was picking up my bike and getting experienced so I can take the class next year. I know it will take me a good 6 months to pick up and be confident in basic riding skills but still I'm so excitied. I still respect my mom, wife, brother, sister and friend and their comments about it being dangerous or destructive, but your comments have also inspired me. Hope my equiment gets here before my riders class.

Muhaha.

 

:lol:

 

Excellent!

 

Twist of the Wrist

Twist of the Wrist Vol 2.

There is a 3rd book, Soft Sciece of RoadRacing, but you could save that one for now.

 

I don't normally mention this, but good riding hear, and using it all the time is the way to go. I know what the islands are like (just visited first time, loved it), but wearing the riding gear (all of it) can really turn a problem into no big deal. I use a mesh jacket in warm weather, but always a full face helmet, pants, gloves too as the bare minimum. I fell once in oil (no way to avoid it) and it was one day I "cheated" and didn't wear a jacket. Not a big deal, but I don't like road rash :)

 

Keep us posted on your progress, you are the first I know of that has started here before riding at all, it will be good to know the progression.

 

The minimum standard we need at the school is not worried about the control actions: shifting, braking, clutch out, etc. I have seen riders with 2 weeks experience do the school, but normally a little more is good. When the control actions are not consuming too much attention, think about coming over.

 

Best,

Cobie

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Hey Muhaha,

 

I'm 53, and I went to my first CSS in 2003. So mid-life crisis, fugedaboutit, it's life, we're a curious sort and like the rest of us here on the forum, we're very interested in motorcycles and piloting them as smartly as we can.

 

I encourage you to follow your dream.

 

And definitely follow Cobie's recommendation about gearing up to stay protected. Full face helmet, gloves, jacket, long pants (minimum), and a sturdy-above the ankle boot.

 

All the best.

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