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Being Patient After Level 1 & 2


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Hi Guys ans Girls

 

I completed Lvl 2 & 3 in JEREZ last year (2008) and afterwards felt I had made poor progress compared with level 1.

 

When I picked my bike up from CSS HQ UK one of the css guys asked how it went and I mentioned my semi-dissapointment - well he said that often pupils make fast progress after level one but take time to benefit from 2 & 3. Was a bit sceptical I guess because my expectations were so high after Level 1 succes !

 

Anyway I have seen the light and on a recent 2500 mile trip thru' the Alps and Dolomites I made the breakthrough - as a less than natural rider it was a smile inducing great feeling to feel in partnership with the bike. By focusing on reference points and getting the habit of looking at the second and third RP just before reaching the closest RP the corners became wide, I relaxed, turned in later and faster and became so much smoother. Just great fun.

 

Just wanted you to know that 2 & 3 were the best biking investment I have made - I just needed to implement to get a return.

 

Regards

 

roundincircles

 

08 Blade, KTM 690 Duke, 1200GS, Bennelli Tre-K

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Hi Guys ans Girls

 

I completed Lvl 2 & 3 in JEREZ last year (2008) and afterwards felt I had made poor progress compared with level 1.

 

When I picked my bike up from CSS HQ UK one of the css guys asked how it went and I mentioned my semi-dissapointment - well he said that often pupils make fast progress after level one but take time to benefit from 2 & 3. Was a bit sceptical I guess because my expectations were so high after Level 1 succes !

 

Anyway I have seen the light and on a recent 2500 mile trip thru' the Alps and Dolomites I made the breakthrough - as a less than natural rider it was a smile inducing great feeling to feel in partnership with the bike. By focusing on reference points and getting the habit of looking at the second and third RP just before reaching the closest RP the corners became wide, I relaxed, turned in later and faster and became so much smoother. Just great fun.

 

Just wanted you to know that 2 & 3 were the best biking investment I have made - I just needed to implement to get a return.

 

Regards

 

roundincircles

 

08 Blade, KTM 690 Duke, 1200GS, Bennelli Tre-K

 

 

Hi roundincircles,

 

Thats a really good post that mate, and one that you'll definitely find is the norm. The level 2 skills particularly are quite tricky to really get nailed, and often students really do take some considerable time to make them part of their riding.

 

I think you should be extremely proud you've made good progress, as many really plateau, and never get that real benefit of the 2nd and 3rd Rps on turns.

 

Thanks for posting and sharing your experience. Keep them coming as you make other breakthroughs.

 

Bullet

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Just wanted you to know that 2 & 3 were the best biking investment I have made - I just needed to implement to get a return.

 

Regards

 

roundincircles

 

08 Blade, KTM 690 Duke, 1200GS, Bennelli Tre-K

 

 

Great to hear this. For sure, level 2 can take some work to get right, and has to be paid attention to--those visual skills!

 

CF

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Great post. It brings a question to mind. Sorry if it's not on topic. Is there any chance that after the school, once I get back to my home track, that I fall back into my old habits? I can do lap after lap within a second of each other at times. I implement new things that I feel make me more comfortable and confident, but it never helps my times. For anyone who sees me ride in Oct/Nov class, they'll see that I have an abundance of bad habits.

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Great post. It brings a question to mind. Sorry if it's not on topic. Is there any chance that after the school, once I get back to my home track, that I fall back into my old habits? I can do lap after lap within a second of each other at times. I implement new things that I feel make me more comfortable and confident, but it never helps my times. For anyone who sees me ride in Oct/Nov class, they'll see that I have an abundance of bad habits.

 

Jason,

 

I'd very much expect the temptation to go back to your comfort zone will be great, however, if you work at those visual skills, I'd almost guarantee you'll find it easier to improve your laptimes.

 

Keep us posted.

 

Bullet

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Great post. It brings a question to mind. Sorry if it's not on topic. Is there any chance that after the school, once I get back to my home track, that I fall back into my old habits? I can do lap after lap within a second of each other at times. I implement new things that I feel make me more comfortable and confident, but it never helps my times. For anyone who sees me ride in Oct/Nov class, they'll see that I have an abundance of bad habits.

 

Jason,

 

For sure stay in touch with us on this point. Putting new tools in place often takes a little attention, until they become "yours", but if you get stuck on something, let's go over it. We'll see how it goes after the 2 days :)

 

CF

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Great post. It brings a question to mind. Sorry if it's not on topic. Is there any chance that after the school, once I get back to my home track, that I fall back into my old habits? I can do lap after lap within a second of each other at times. I implement new things that I feel make me more comfortable and confident, but it never helps my times. For anyone who sees me ride in Oct/Nov class, they'll see that I have an abundance of bad habits.

 

Jason,

 

For sure stay in touch with us on this point. Putting new tools in place often takes a little attention, until they become "yours", but if you get stuck on something, let's go over it. We'll see how it goes after the 2 days :)

 

CF

I'll be doing a Nov 22 class after the school, and between the school and track I'm going to really work on setting what I've learned in stone.

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That's brilliant Jason. I've been working on body position and it's taken me several track days to get to the point now where I am just barely starting to feel comfortable... I think I'm actually slower with my improved BP because it takes so much concentration. I know that it will pay off when it becomes 2nd nature though! The same is true for the rest of it... my next priority will be my quick turns. Eventually I'll be big-pimpin' pimp.gif, LOL!

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  • 3 weeks later...
That's brilliant Jason. I've been working on body position and it's taken me several track days to get to the point now where I am just barely starting to feel comfortable... I think I'm actually slower with my improved BP because it takes so much concentration. I know that it will pay off when it becomes 2nd nature though! The same is true for the rest of it... my next priority will be my quick turns. Eventually I'll be big-pimpin' pimp.gif, LOL!

So during the school I listened to everything I could. Working on BP is a thing for me, so in the counterclockwise turn 1, I took that time to work on sliding my butt back a little. I learned that sliding back too much puts more pressure on the bars for me, but I did need to go back just a little more. And I brought my elbows down and in. I was taught to keep my wrists straight, but never could figure out why. It started, but I hadn't figured it out just yet, when I learned that I was pushing DOWN on the bars, and fought with the bike. Getting over the tank and dropping my elbows allowed me to push on the bars SO MUCH easier. It made the bike drop that much faster. Now if I could just stop getting on the gas while I'm dipping the bike.

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Now if I could just stop getting on the gas while I'm dipping the bike.

 

What's the one thing you could do that would stop you getting back to the gas too early and thus resist this temptation my friend...? Or should we ask, why is it that you're so keen to get back to throttle so soon...?

 

Bullet

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Now if I could just stop getting on the gas while I'm dipping the bike.

 

What's the one thing you could do that would stop you getting back to the gas too early and thus resist this temptation my friend...? Or should we ask, why is it that you're so keen to get back to throttle so soon...?

 

Bullet

I need to complete the turn first. Old habit. I've never been able to quick turn like I did the two days I was in Vegas. I even got blue flagged for it. I always knew that I was going in too slow, so to compensate I would get back on the throttle real soon.

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Now if I could just stop getting on the gas while I'm dipping the bike.

 

What's the one thing you could do that would stop you getting back to the gas too early and thus resist this temptation my friend...? Or should we ask, why is it that you're so keen to get back to throttle so soon...?

 

Bullet

I need to complete the turn first. Old habit. I've never been able to quick turn like I did the two days I was in Vegas. I even got blue flagged for it. I always knew that I was going in too slow, so to compensate I would get back on the throttle real soon.

 

you're right.. you do need to complete the turning of the bike first... but your temptation to get back to so soon is primarly caused coz by the later part of your statement... you think it, whether its true or not....? But thats what's causing that really! So how could you resolve that aspect of it..?

 

Bullet

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Now if I could just stop getting on the gas while I'm dipping the bike.

 

What's the one thing you could do that would stop you getting back to the gas too early and thus resist this temptation my friend...? Or should we ask, why is it that you're so keen to get back to throttle so soon...?

 

Bullet

I need to complete the turn first. Old habit. I've never been able to quick turn like I did the two days I was in Vegas. I even got blue flagged for it. I always knew that I was going in too slow, so to compensate I would get back on the throttle real soon.

 

you're right.. you do need to complete the turning of the bike first... but your temptation to get back to so soon is primarly caused coz by the later part of your statement... you think it, whether its true or not....? But thats what's causing that really! So how could you resolve that aspect of it..?

 

Bullet

 

I thought the other day it had just become habit. I was going through the carousel and already leaned over (following Stu) and when I dipped the bike even farther (LOVED it) I cranked the throttle also. I don't know how else to fix it other than being more patient.

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Now if I could just stop getting on the gas while I'm dipping the bike.

 

What's the one thing you could do that would stop you getting back to the gas too early and thus resist this temptation my friend...? Or should we ask, why is it that you're so keen to get back to throttle so soon...?

 

Bullet

I need to complete the turn first. Old habit. I've never been able to quick turn like I did the two days I was in Vegas. I even got blue flagged for it. I always knew that I was going in too slow, so to compensate I would get back on the throttle real soon.

 

you're right.. you do need to complete the turning of the bike first... but your temptation to get back to so soon is primarly caused coz by the later part of your statement... you think it, whether its true or not....? But thats what's causing that really! So how could you resolve that aspect of it..?

 

Bullet

 

I thought the other day it had just become habit. I was going through the carousel and already leaned over (following Stu) and when I dipped the bike even farther (LOVED it) I cranked the throttle also. I don't know how else to fix it other than being more patient.

 

 

Well patience is one way, but how about if you carried just a llittle bit more speed into that earlier part turn? Would that stop your need to get back to the throttle so quickly?

 

Now, when we're talking about carrying a bit more speed, it's important to be very clear here. You need to do this with a plan, i.e. something like, I'm going to brake a little bit later, and just carry say 3-5 mph more into the turn as you turn the bike. If you don't have a plan, what you'll get is SR's firing off left right and center, and thats not a plan at all. Only do it one turn where you think you could easily get away with it, i.e. not a hairpin, experiment see if that gives you what you want.

 

Bullet

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Now if I could just stop getting on the gas while I'm dipping the bike.

 

What's the one thing you could do that would stop you getting back to the gas too early and thus resist this temptation my friend...? Or should we ask, why is it that you're so keen to get back to throttle so soon...?

 

Bullet

I need to complete the turn first. Old habit. I've never been able to quick turn like I did the two days I was in Vegas. I even got blue flagged for it. I always knew that I was going in too slow, so to compensate I would get back on the throttle real soon.

 

you're right.. you do need to complete the turning of the bike first... but your temptation to get back to so soon is primarly caused coz by the later part of your statement... you think it, whether its true or not....? But thats what's causing that really! So how could you resolve that aspect of it..?

 

Bullet

 

I thought the other day it had just become habit. I was going through the carousel and already leaned over (following Stu) and when I dipped the bike even farther (LOVED it) I cranked the throttle also. I don't know how else to fix it other than being more patient.

 

 

Well patience is one way, but how about if you carried just a llittle bit more speed into that earlier part turn? Would that stop your need to get back to the throttle so quickly?

 

Now, when we're talking about carrying a bit more speed, it's important to be very clear here. You need to do this with a plan, i.e. something like, I'm going to brake a little bit later, and just carry say 3-5 mph more into the turn as you turn the bike. If you don't have a plan, what you'll get is SR's firing off left right and center, and thats not a plan at all. Only do it one turn where you think you could easily get away with it, i.e. not a hairpin, experiment see if that gives you what you want.

 

Bullet

 

Thanks Bullet. I caught on quickly in Vegas, and will have to work on it at my home track. It's going to take some getting used to. I could do lap after lap within a second on East, and almost just as consistent on West. It was all from bad habit though. I was perfectly comfortable doing 1:03's just cruising around Vegas, and when I did a hot lap when I had an opening, it was a 1:04. I was tempted to go for 1:00, but during the hot lap, I noticed my vision really narrowed, so I didn't even try. After just two days in the school I was more comfortable on that track than any of the three I ride on now.

 

I'll have to slowly increase the speed, and have already been visualizing the track and working on the two step by watching video of the track I'm riding on the 22nd (I'll let you know how that went). Not just for points, but to further embed the two step, which made the whole school worth it.

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