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Foot Position And Rear Suspension Movement Video


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Dylan,

 

what kind of Peg's / Rearsets are those ?? , they look almost like motocross pegs in the video

Those are MX footpegs that are part of an experiment we are doing. More info to come in the coming months. That was video I took of myself on track last weekend at Vegas.

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Hi Dylan,

 

I see that in the turns with regard to your inside foot, you do not keep the ball of the foot on the peg but the outside part on the peg and the ball of the foot kind of raised at an angle and touching the part the peg is attached to?

 

Can you explain why you do this as opposed to the traditional ball of the foot on the peg in the turns?

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Hi Dylan,

 

I see that in the turns with regard to your inside foot, you do not keep the ball of the foot on the peg but the outside part on the peg and the ball of the foot kind of raised at an angle and touching the part the peg is attached to?

 

Can you explain why you do this as opposed to the traditional ball of the foot on the peg in the turns?

It's a habit I got into early on. Maybe it had something to do with the little GP bikes I rode when I was a pesky teenager.

 

Have a look at this picture of Marc Marquez and tell me what you see there.

post-9398-0-35244100-1397743455_thumb.jpg

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looks like there is minimal hangoff... i might be wrong thou~

And the footpegs + footwork, kinda reminds me of the vertical bamboo climb they taught is in BMT ~

 

 

This is a photo from me riding that weekend and my typical body position.

 

 

It looks so effortless in the video~ Im impressed, thats phenomenal core + lower body strength!

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Interesting that you should mention Marquez, Dylan.I was watching the circuit of the Americas GP race today and made the following observations.

 

1. Some riders put the ball of the foot area on the outside peg when leaned over.Others put the arch area, the kinda crease between the heel part and toe part in a race boot on the pegs.Some use the area a little behind the ball of the foot.

 

Also the foot is slightly turned away to the outside, kinda pointing at the sky when leaned over.

 

Is any one method better? Or is it just a matter of preference as long as you have a secure hold?

 

2. As they are approaching the turn and are doing the hard braking while upright, some slide their foot along the tarmac [ Rossi, Bradl ] while Lorenzo will put his inside leg way out in an exaggerated triangle [ The triangle of light i believe it is called ].The ball of his foot is on the peg and his foot is turned toward the corner at about a 45 degree angle. [ I think this is the correct position ]

 

Then, as they lean the bike over the guys who drag their boot on the tarmac will fold their leg in one motion on to the peg and settle into the hang off position.

 

Lorenzo [ who already has the ball of his foot on the peg ] will bring his knee toward the bike as the bike leans over ie - His knee is dragging on the ground, and comes closer to him as the bike leans more and more.

 

Furthermore, the heel of the boot on the inside leg will be touching the bike....the part which the peg attaches to.Therefore both feet will be turned away by some amount.

 

I have not observed the Dylanesque outside of the foot on the peg tilt on anyone [ these two GP's past ] and was wondering.

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In the photo of Marquez, i see he has the arch of the outside foot on the peg and more of the outside of the foot on the peg rather than the ball area....but not tilted as much as Dylan i think.What i take away is that when you put your knee out and try to put weight on the ball of the foot, more weight falls to the outside area of the foot because the knee is away from the body.The reverse would occur if you tried to put weight on the ball of your foot with your knee drawn towards your other leg.

 

I have also observed that the position of the feet varies a bit in the races, especially when there is someone close by trying to overtake or they go in too hot.When they are alone their position is more consistent.

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Interesting that you should mention Marquez, Dylan.I was watching the circuit of the Americas GP race today and made the following observations.

 

1. Some riders put the ball of the foot area on the outside peg when leaned over.Others put the arch area, the kinda crease between the heel part and toe part in a race boot on the pegs.Some use the area a little behind the ball of the foot.

 

Also the foot is slightly turned away to the outside, kinda pointing at the sky when leaned over.

 

Is any one method better? Or is it just a matter of preference as long as you have a secure hold?

 

2. As they are approaching the turn and are doing the hard braking while upright, some slide their foot along the tarmac [ Rossi, Bradl ] while Lorenzo will put his inside leg way out in an exaggerated triangle [ The triangle of light i believe it is called ].The ball of his foot is on the peg and his foot is turned toward the corner at about a 45 degree angle. [ I think this is the correct position ]

 

Then, as they lean the bike over the guys who drag their boot on the tarmac will fold their leg in one motion on to the peg and settle into the hang off position.

 

Lorenzo [ who already has the ball of his foot on the peg ] will bring his knee toward the bike as the bike leans over ie - His knee is dragging on the ground, and comes closer to him as the bike leans more and more.

 

Furthermore, the heel of the boot on the inside leg will be touching the bike....the part which the peg attaches to.Therefore both feet will be turned away by some amount.

 

I have not observed the Dylanesque outside of the foot on the peg tilt on anyone [ these two GP's past ] and was wondering.

 

Good observations. Firstly if I was on a MotoGP bike, I'm pretty sure my position would be different than on an S1000. How it would be different I don't know but I do know that it is different on a very small GP style Moriwaki when I have the chance to ride them.

 

These variations in riding style really tell us one important thing: there are options. It also shows that riders connect to the bikes in different ways but the overall posture is similar for nearly all GP riders.

 

When talking riding position you have to consider the variables: rider's body size, rider's inherent style, bike size, bike proportions, bike shape (tank, seat), footpeg size/grip/profile/width, and the list goes on. Body position should be guided by things like comfort, stability and good joint alignment where possible.

 

Keith came up with a list called the "57 Elements of Body Position" that addresses virtually all aspects of a rider's position on the bike. Angle of foot is just one facet that also has a chain reaction with the other parts of the body if changed--which could be positive or negative depending on the rider's current body position package.

 

Regarding the variations of leg dangling with the MotoGP riders--we see Lorenzo not doing it, Rossi -the inventor- doing it less, and just about everyone else doing it here and there. No one really understands its relative usefulness and that includes me. All I know is it changes the center of mass very slightly and that may be enough to help under hard braking at lap record pace.

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I thought they dragged the boot as a sort of crutch so that under hard braking and as they were tipping it is, the foot in contact with the ground would act as some sort of support and keep them from falling off if the front end started to give out a bit?

 

Where can i read/find this list about body position, if you please?

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I thought they dragged the boot as a sort of crutch so that under hard braking and as they were tipping it is, the foot in contact with the ground would act as some sort of support and keep them from falling off if the front end started to give out a bit?

 

Where can i read/find this list about body position, if you please?

I don't think the foot will do any support. With any weight, the foot would be suddenly pulled back and hurt considerably.

 

On the body position list, I think Keith is working on a published version. Not sure when he will have it ready but it's in the works.

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With regard to leg dangling : I read somewhere, I think it was motomatters.com, where it was being said that the leg dangling helps with the stability of the bike especially when the rear is unloaded during heavy braking . It was also mentioned that Lorenzo brakes more progressively over a greater distance and his bike rarely/never gets out of shape during braking.

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Hi Dylan,

 

I see that in the turns with regard to your inside foot, you do not keep the ball of the foot on the peg but the outside part on the peg and the ball of the foot kind of raised at an angle and touching the part the peg is attached to?

 

Can you explain why you do this as opposed to the traditional ball of the foot on the peg in the turns?

It's a habit I got into early on. Maybe it had something to do with the little GP bikes I rode when I was a pesky teenager.

 

Have a look at this picture of Marc Marquez and tell me what you see there.

 

 

This is an interesting observation to me as well. I have very wide feet (3E) and tend to rotate my toes out when I turn in. Unless I have the rearset peg in the crook of my toes I end up dragging my toe slider. And when I do have my foot that far back I dont feel properly connected to the bike.

 

I may have to experiment with alternate foot positioning at my next level 4. Dylan - if you're at VIR in May I may try to corner you to discuss it.

 

Best,

Carey

post-16961-0-84661600-1397833240_thumb.jpg

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Dylan,

 

From looking at the video it seems that you have little or no weight on the inside foot. It seems natural that with little or no weight that the entire leg would be relaxed and can feel the ground better. This has been a topic that has puzzled me for some time even after attending the school.

 

Can you please clarify the weight distribution and change between the time you are upright with 0 lean and at full lean for a corner.

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Dylan,

 

From looking at the video it seems that you have little or no weight on the inside foot. It seems natural that with little or no weight that the entire leg would be relaxed and can feel the ground better. This has been a topic that has puzzled me for some time even after attending the school.

 

Can you please clarify the weight distribution and change between the time you are upright with 0 lean and at full lean for a corner.

 

Ah jeez. That's tough to specifically answer because I think it will vary depending on corner type, bike type, rider fit to bike, tank grips or not, and the list goes on. When I was on track at Willow yesterday I paid attention to the amount of weight I was supporting with my inside leg and there definitely was weight being supported but I would not say it was a significant amount. I would say more than "light" and less than "moderate" as a very rough, vague and useless description.

 

I would agree that you would have better feel with a more relaxed leg, though bar feel would be far more important.

 

Zero lean would be less weight than leaned, for certain.

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