Jump to content

High Speed Perception Alteration


rchase
 Share

Recommended Posts

It's taken me a bit of time to be able to process this but I wanted to share my experience and perhaps get some insight from other riders.

 

Heading down the straight at Roebling Road at 150+mph I experienced a rather interesting alteration of my perception. The sides of the track were there but weren't in focus. The bike at full throttle near redline was still there but suddenly was quieter than normal. The wind blast no longer bothered me. Quite honestly it was like a moment of zen. On the brakes closing on my turn point "reality" snapped back and I was back to my normal self.

 

Has anyone else experienced this? I have read at 155mph we are traveling faster than we can actually process information (hence the 155 limiters on many European cars). My fastest speed was around 154mph so I was 1mph under this the whole time.

 

At those high 155+ speeds how do the really talented riders cope with that? Is it just a lot of advanced planning at those speeds? I have noticed many of the IOMTT riders actually turn their bikes well before you can see the corners in videos.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have read at 155mph we are traveling faster than we can actually process information (hence the 155 limiters on many European cars).

 

 

I'm not sure I believe that, for one I have defiantly met people who were unable to process information traveling at 25 mph, and pilots seem perfectly capable of processing information at considerably faster speeds than 155, so I don't think the actual speed has anything to do with it. I think you just have to adjust your frame of reference depending on the speed, for example a 3 second following distance varies from 220 feet at 50 Mph to 660 feet at 150.

 

I would agree that at those kinds of speed we are unable to process all the superfluous information around us, which could help enable the zen like focus that you describe

 

 

Tyler

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is, in my opinion, the smooth flow of information that is desired in the Wide View drill. A huge part of getting used to high speeds is learning to process the visual info; the better your Wide View, the more space you have to ride and the less rushed or panicky you feel.

 

I absolutely agree with what Tyler says above - some people are overwhelmed even at very low speeds - try going to a public Go-kart track and watch beginning drivers. Some will go so slow it will boggle your mind to watch them, you could jog faster.

 

In any case, good job, Robert, on achieving that zen-like state, that is an accomplishment and presumably it means that you were using your $10 of attention in all the right places, and had change left over. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I have read at 155mph we are traveling faster than we can actually process information (hence the 155 limiters on many European cars).

 

 

I'm not sure I believe that, for one I have defiantly met people who were unable to process information traveling at 25 mph, and pilots seem perfectly capable of processing information at considerably faster speeds than 155, so I don't think the actual speed has anything to do with it. I think you just have to adjust your frame of reference depending on the speed, for example a 3 second following distance varies from 220 feet at 50 Mph to 660 feet at 150.

 

I would agree that at those kinds of speed we are unable to process all the superfluous information around us, which could help enable the zen like focus that you describe

 

 

Tyler

 

 

Tyler I agree with you on this. I'm sure there have been studies but those all depend on your control group. If you were to compare the reflexes of your average F15 pilot and the average person you would find massive differences. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Tyler I agree with you on this. I'm sure there have been studies but those all depend on your control group. If you were to compare the reflexes of your average F15 pilot and the average person you would find massive differences. :)

 

 

I'd offer up my services for experimentation, but I wasn't average... :rolleyes:

 

Benny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is, in my opinion, the smooth flow of information that is desired in the Wide View drill. A huge part of getting used to high speeds is learning to process the visual info; the better your Wide View, the more space you have to ride and the less rushed or panicky you feel.

 

I absolutely agree with what Tyler says above - some people are overwhelmed even at very low speeds - try going to a public Go-kart track and watch beginning drivers. Some will go so slow it will boggle your mind to watch them, you could jog faster.

 

In any case, good job, Robert, on achieving that zen-like state, that is an accomplishment and presumably it means that you were using your $10 of attention in all the right places, and had change left over. :)

 

It really was a very cool experience. I never felt rushed at all I just became aware that at those speeds things were VERY different. The BMW at full throttle is almost like having warp drive. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Tyler I agree with you on this. I'm sure there have been studies but those all depend on your control group. If you were to compare the reflexes of your average F15 pilot and the average person you would find massive differences. :)

 

 

I'd offer up my services for experimentation, but I wasn't average... :rolleyes:

 

Benny

 

 

Heh heh. You caught that. :)

 

I was going to use the generic "fighter pilot" but figured F15 would be more fun.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You guys may have a point.At one time, 80 kph meant the nuts and bolts would fall off the 12 hp two strokes that we had here.Now...130-140 kph on the newer four strokes seems a zen experience.I am sure as faster bikes land here, what was once a scary experience will be a calm stroll.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The zen like state will evaporate pretty quickly and be replaced by stampeding butterflies in your stomach if you get even a tiny bit off line. The track gets very narrow at that speed....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The zen like state will evaporate pretty quickly and be replaced by stampeding butterflies in your stomach if you get even a tiny bit off line. The track gets very narrow at that speed....

 

That's certainly true. Unpredictable traffic will make you roll out of the throttle real quick. :)

 

What really stuck with me is how much ground you cover and how slow the steering seems to be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I once fell off a bicycle.It seemed so slow....like i fell a mile even though i fell three feet.I wonder if it is the adrenalin at that speed which causes time to slow?

 

I had time to think " Aah...leaned it too much in the dirt.This is going to hurt, must take care to break the fall..." and a pile of other things.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...