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No Brakes And 4Th Gear Only At Sears Point


Dylan Code
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  • 3 weeks later...

This is a great video, Dylan!

 

Perhaps it serves as a good basement for you and other coaches and experienced riders to explain what has been confusing to me for long time: the point along the turn to open the throttle.

 

According to Chapter 5 of "A Twist of the Wrist II":

"When? - As soon as possible. You get the gas on at the earliest possible moment in a corner."

 

When do you get to the throttle?

How can it be too soon?

What is the sign that indicates that "possible moment"?

 

Most videos found in the web consistently show a clear braking or deceleration of the bike all the way precisely to the apex.

It seems that, for these riders, the apex is chosen as that magical "possible moment".

 

According to what I understand in the book about best range of suspension and optimum traction during cornering, decelerating while leaning and turning only overloads the front tire.

Although being so popular in track days and races, is that a wrong practice? :mellow::mellow::mellow:

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This is a great video, Dylan!

 

Perhaps it serves as a good basement for you and other couches and experienced riders to explain what has been confusing to me for long time: the point along the turn to open the throttle.

 

According to Chapter 5 of "A Twist of the Wrist II":

"When? - As soon as possible. You get the gas on at the earliest possible moment in a corner."

 

When do you get to the throttle?

How can it be too soon?

What is the sign that indicates that "possible moment"?

 

Most videos found in the web consistently show a clear braking or deceleration of the bike all the way precisely to the apex.

It seems that, for these riders, the apex is chosen as that magical "possible moment".

 

According to what I understand in the book about best range of suspension and optimum traction during cornering, decelerating while leaning and turning only overloads the front tire.

Although being so popular in track days and races, is that a wrong practice? :mellow::mellow::mellow:

Just read a little further in Twist II and your answer will be there:

 

You get the gas on at the earliest possible moment in a corner. This does not mean at the apex, right before the apex or right after the apex, or at any particular part of the turn, it means as soon as possible.

To meet the throttle standard, steering is completed before you start to get it on.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just read a little further in Twist II and your answer will be there:

 

You get the gas on at the earliest possible moment in a corner. This does not mean at the apex, right before the apex or right after the apex, or at any particular part of the turn, it means as soon as possible.

To meet the throttle standard, steering is completed before you start to get it on.

 

 

Thanks!

 

Can we say then that as soon as possible is the moment when the steering is completed?

Are there other factors other than steering for which the rider should wait or that could make the opening of the throttle non-possible?

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We can find exceptions to every rule but in a general sense, you don't want to get on the gas until you are on line. Maybe a rider is done leaning his bike into a turn but waits a moment longer for the bike to fully get on line. Leaned in while off the throttle will give an ever tightening radius as speed decreases. So this can be a philisophical discussion as to whether the completion of leaning the bike in, or bike going to the exact line you want, is "steered". The best way to solve these deeper topics of discussion is to watch some videos of good riders and see what they do, as well as going out and riding yourself and finding what gives you, the rider, the results you want for a corner. At the end of the day you are going to apply a technique in a way that gives you the right speed and line for the turns you take.

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Just read a little further in Twist II and your answer will be there:

 

You get the gas on at the earliest possible moment in a corner. This does not mean at the apex, right before the apex or right after the apex, or at any particular part of the turn, it means as soon as possible.

To meet the throttle standard, steering is completed before you start to get it on.

 

 

Thanks!

 

Can we say then that as soon as possible is the moment when the steering is completed?

Are there other factors other than steering for which the rider should wait or that could make the opening of the throttle non-possible?

 

 

Im thinking of a very unexpected step out type of slide mid way during steering when it isnt complete (in which throttle might be maintained or slightly reduced/ slighty opened to stabilize the bike but not a complete roll on ; drop the throttle= high change of a high side on a bike like the bmw S1000rr if the ESP is dailed to 0 aka sans ESP)

 

or

 

a pogo-ing suspension (hardware problem)

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