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Dragging The Front Brake?


Wisquared
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I've recently been dreaming/meditating about some new techniques that were suggesed to me by a riding coach. But I dunno how widely used they are. So!! My question for the Guru's is: With the idea that .1th of seconds are lost in the reaction time between inputs, then the faster transitions=faster laptimes. EG. from the "off brake" ref. point to the "on gas" point, the faster one can make this transition, the faster they'll be right?---So! would it help to ever-so-slightly begin the on gas roll-on at the same time as one is just letting off brake (but still ever so slightly on the brake still)? Essentially on gas roll at the same time as one is dragging off from the front brake?

is this a technique that will make me faster and smoother?

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I've recently been dreaming/meditating about some new techniques that were suggesed to me by a riding coach. But I dunno how widely used they are. So!! My question for the Guru's is: With the idea that .1th of seconds are lost in the reaction time between inputs, then the faster transitions=faster laptimes. EG. from the "off brake" ref. point to the "on gas" point, the faster one can make this transition, the faster they'll be right?---So! would it help to ever-so-slightly begin the on gas roll-on at the same time as one is just letting off brake (but still ever so slightly on the brake still)? Essentially on gas roll at the same time as one is dragging off from the front brake?

is this a technique that will make me faster and smoother?

 

Wisquared,

 

Why not just turn up the idly a bit that will get the throttle on slightly and help. There have been some racers who have used this as a technique and I can't say it is wrong but it is complicated and you have to be delicate with the controls to make it work and not cause problems like a power surge while leaned over and on the brakes, that could ruin your day.

 

I don't like to base things on what pro riders do but you can clearly see that no one who has ever had a camera on their bike in MotoGP is using that technique and those guys are pretty smooth and pretty fast. When they show the brake/gas graph it is always one or the other never have I seen both at the same time.

 

Keith

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You'll be using up some front wheel traction for braking, and using up some rear wheel traction for throttle, they'll be using up traction just fighting against each other, and that at the moment when you need all your traction for cornering. This is really not sounding like a good idea to me. Even if that is not the intention of the technique, seens to me that you sure would be risking getting into that scenario.

 

Plus, are you really loosing "reaction time?" A reaction time is the time it takes to react to something UNEXPECTED. A car pulls out in front of you and there's a delay (reaction time) before you actually get on the brakes. On the track, when reaching the point where you let off the brake, the point where you turn in, and the point where you start the throttle on, you know all these points are coming ahead of time, so I can't see why one would loose time due to a delayed reaction.

 

The transition more worth focusing on would be from full left lean to full right lean, or full upright to full lean - being able to do that very quickly but smoothly could improve your speed on a track by probably a lot more than a few tenths of a second.

 

I hope you don't mind that I answered even though I am not the Guru. :)

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