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Getting On The Gas


qzrlsd
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I've recently done a track day and was picked up for "Powering round the corners". I was told not to get on the throttle until I hit the apex of the corner otherwise I would could highside. This has me confused as I thought it was best to get on the gas as soon as possible. If I was near to highsiding then could I simply be applying too much throttle? When I tip the bike in should I apply a small amount of throttle and then increase this very gradually through the turn?

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That's true. And if I understand the mechanics of it properly, cracking the throttle open will cause the front forks to settle, but you must gradually apply more throttle while decreasing your lean angle(rolling the throttle while standing the bike up). If you snap the throttle open, it causes the forks to extend, thereby widening your line, and you could go off track, or in extreme cases, highside. Anyone please correct me if I am wrong.

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I've recently done a track day and was picked up for "Powering round the corners". I was told not to get on the throttle until I hit the apex of the corner otherwise I would could highside. This has me confused as I thought it was best to get on the gas as soon as possible. If I was near to highsiding then could I simply be applying too much throttle? When I tip the bike in should I apply a small amount of throttle and then increase this very gradually through the turn?

 

Hi qzrlsd,

 

Someone like Kevin Kane or 2bigalow who are more familiar with the current teaching methods at the school would be better equipped to answer this, but, I will take a stab at it.

 

First, it is always difficult to say anything without "being there" to see what the coach sees. That said ...

 

Chances are that you are/were not carrying anything near to the actual limit of corner speed or lean angle, hence, there is more traction available than ordinarily would be were you actually near the limit and you are/were sort of "getting away" with more throttle than you otherwise would at a more spirited pace. Hence, although you are "getting away with it", so to speak, you might be learning what amounts to a "bad habit", as it were .... AND .... yes, I would say that you are correct in your last question: tip the bike in and apply a small amount of throttle and increase gradually through the turn.

 

 

In general, it is possible to get on the gas too hard, too early and risk applying a sudden "shock" to the coefficient of traction, so to speak. In other words, although there might be enough traction available for the cornerspeed you are attempting to achieve, it is the sudden application of acceleration (rate of change) that will break the tire loose before the contact patch has a chance to "react" or adapt.

 

Tire compounds are almost alive in the way they "react" to inputs of force. And there is a delay, that is to say, it takes a certain amount of time for a particular compound to reshape or adapt itself to irregularities in the road surface or to stress forces applied. And it also takes time for the compound to "recover" or "remember" its original shape or condition. There is literally a "hysteresis" curve or loop between reaction/adaptation time and memory/recovery time that applied force or stress needs to stay within from a scientific point of view.

 

The contact patch viewed in slow motion would be seen to be constantly growing and shrinking a little bit while gripping and releasing the road as the tire turns onto each little new part of "tread" or rubber surface.

 

Anyway, I'm sure someone more knowledgeable about the school's current policies and procedures can give you a more direct or concise (if practiced) answer to your question.

 

Cheers,

 

racer

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Racer is right about the observation part. Without actually seeing what you're doing, it hard to correct the problem.

 

However, remember to get on the gas AFTER your steering imput is done. IE you've leaned the bike to the correct angle needed to make the corner at hand. And as racer said, a nice even roll on after that.

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  • 8 months later...
That's true. And if I understand the mechanics of it properly, cracking the throttle open will cause the front forks to settle, but you must gradually apply more throttle while decreasing your lean angle(rolling the throttle while standing the bike up). If you snap the throttle open, it causes the forks to extend, thereby widening your line, and you could go off track, or in extreme cases, highside. Anyone please correct me if I am wrong.

My understanding is that you want to get on the throttle as early as possible. This can be before the apex, but you want to crack it on gently and roll on smoothly. If you do this, you may have a small slide but not one big enough to cause you to have an SR and slam the throttle shut (THAT will cause you to high-side). Also, cracking on the throttle puts roughly 60% of the weight on the rear tire (that has a bigger contact patch) and 40% on the front (smaller patch), and it allows the forks to operate in the middle third of their movement range (ideal). If/when you slide, you should either hold the throttle right where it is or back off a tiny bit. The bike wants to correct itself -- your job is to not get in the way of this happening.

 

Paul

(I am not a coach - YET)

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