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Hotfoot

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Everything posted by Hotfoot

  1. What's the best modification or accessory you have done or added to your bike to make it more comfortable for you to ride, or put you in better control? For me, adding Stompgrip on the tank made a huge difference (on every bike I've had) on being stable on the bike, and adjusting the clutch and brake lever and the shift lever have made me more accurate with the controls. What have you done to your bike that has made it more comfortable, easier to ride, or put you more in control?
  2. Hotfoot

    Can we do it again?

    Congrats on your great wins and results, sounds like a lot of fun. Were you at VIR this week?
  3. The school will have pretty much everything you need available - sunscreen, earplugs, water, snacks, etc. However, at Barber some things you could end up wanting to have: a folding chair, for break times - there is seating in the classroom, but you might want to have a chair you can put somewhere in the shade for times between class and riding. A comfortable, cool layer to wear under your leathers, either an undersuit made for the purpose or something like UnderArmour pants and shirt. An underlayer makes it a LOT easier to get in and out of leathers, plus being cooler and more comfortable underneath. A regular cotton tshirt can get bunched up or wet under leathers and won't keep you as cool as UnderArmour or an undersuit. The school does have undersuits for sale, in limited size/quantity, you may want to call ahead to see if they can reserve one for you in your size and find out the price. Drinks of your own if you have a preference - keeping hydrated is important, it can get hot at Barber. The school will have water and Skratch (an electrolyte drink) available. If you want to run a Go Pro, mention it as you register in the morning to find out if it will be allowed and to leave time to arrange for mounting the camera. As far as money goes - there are plenty of things to buy, T shirts, caps, track decals, not to mention bike parts and Stomp grip, so how much to bring is up to you. Credit card is fine for purchases and you will need a credit card for your equipment deposit anyway, so you may just want to bring that instead of a bunch of cash. Also Barber museum is nearby, and a giant Bass Pro shop, so there are lots of places you can spend money if you're so inclined. Consider making time the day before or after your school to visit the Barber Museum, it is AMAZING.
  4. Hotfoot

    Help - How to learn/start using knee sliders??

    I've only seen the Woodcraft ones in use, they seemed to work well for the purpose, and they were fairly thick. I haven't tried them myself but the person that was using them got them because he didn't like the sound or sensation of scraping standard pucks. I presume they wouldn't last as long as standard pucks if you dragged them a lot, but his were holding up fine. I have seen a few creative ideas - one person took a couple of stiff plastic zip ties and fed them through the Velcro under the knee puck so they stuck out like curb feelers, to try to touch those down. Not sure if he actually took that out on track or whether it worked, but I did think it was creative. :)
  5. Hotfoot

    Can Weight Shift Theory be debunked?

    That helps a lot, yes.
  6. Hotfoot

    Can Weight Shift Theory be debunked?

    Nice post, Lnewqban. Jaybird, what is it that you are trying to fix or figure out? We know from riding our no BS bike at the school that you can get a bike to drift to one side by hanging weight off to one side - as Lnewqban addresses quite well above. But we also know that it is slow and imprecise, and anyone who has ridden the no BS bike recognizes immediately that they are not in control of the motorcycle when their hands are on the fixed bars. Given a slow enough speed and enough time and space to accomplish it, you can get the bike to turn, but it is hardly effective enough to get one around a racetrack or avoid an obstacle. You can see a clear demonstration of this in the Twist II DVD, you can see the effects of weight shift, how the the bike reacts and how the bars react. I'm not quite clear whether you are trying to address hanging weight off to the inside, or talking about weighting one peg without moving the Center of Mass, the effects are different. More importantly, what challenge are you facing in your riding that has you asking about this? (Or is it all just an academic dicussion ? )
  7. Hotfoot

    Help - How to learn/start using knee sliders??

    Some other tricks... rain sliders are thicker and touch down sooner, and there are also leather sliders that make a less startling noise when they scrape.
  8. Hotfoot

    Experiments with Shifting Gears and Turn Radius

    Huh? Did I say something about a communication lag...?
  9. Hotfoot

    Experiments with Shifting Gears and Turn Radius

    Just so we are clear, I'm talking about higher rpm while already leaned over, which is not the same thing as having some throttle on while steering the bike. The bike feels more stable in the turn at higher rpm because the lean angle is set and it doesn't want to change because of the increased gyroscopic effect. For me on the S1000rr it can feel more stable at a higher rpm (lower gear) in a slow tight turn like the last few turns at Streets of Willow or Turn 9 at ACS, less reactive to rider movement or rough throttle inputs because the lean angle doesn't change as easily, and the more immediate throttle response when picking up the gas helps me to get better throttle control. Feeling a desire or need to have some throttle on when ENTERING a turn tells you something about your entry speed, do you remember what?
  10. Hotfoot

    Experiments with Shifting Gears and Turn Radius

    I don't agree that stability is our enemy. Yes the added stability would make the bike harder to steer initially, but a CRF110 is never going to be difficult to get to turn. However, more stability leaned over could make that particular bike easier to manage in a very tight turn, less twitchy and not as reactive to the rider moving around or oversteering, etc., which seems to me to be a bigger consideration on a little dirt bike than getting it to turn in the first place.
  11. Hotfoot

    Experiments with Shifting Gears and Turn Radius

    So was the rear wheel spinning up more?
  12. Hotfoot

    Experiments with Shifting Gears and Turn Radius

    What do you mean by "hold more throttle under control"?
  13. Hotfoot

    Experiments with Shifting Gears and Turn Radius

    Higher RPM in a corner does make a difference in motorcycle handling. Take a look at this article: https://www.msgroup.org/forums/mtt/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=2182 There is also the effect of greater engine braking approaching the turn, which may have allowed you to shorten your braking distance, or use less brake and get a more accurate entry speed.
  14. Hotfoot

    How Much Weight On The Seat?

    This particular item, in my opinion, is a great example of something that is not a matter of who is right and wrong as much as what works for one rider versus another, depending on that riders bike and their physical build and flexibility. Different bikes have different rider handlebar heights and distance from the seat, different shaped tanks, different rearset heights and configurations, etc. and that all impacts how the rider can hang on, and hang off. Even if you just narrow it down to sportbikes, you can look at a Ducati gas tank versus a Yamaha gas tank and see that rider lock on will not be the same from one to the other. And of course, a 6'3" 180 lb rider would fit on a bike differently than a 5'1" 180 lb rider. You can go to any track day and see LOTS of riders hanging their butt WAYY off the seat, even riders who are riding at a slow pace in the beginner group. Very often you will ALSO see those riders propping themselves up with their inside arm, and/or crossing their head and upper body BACK over the tank to the other side, so they really aren't shifting any weight to the inside after all. (OK, gallery, what is wrong with propping yourself up with the inside arm?). Some riders are strong enough and flexible enough (and tall enough!) to find a position where they hang off more than half their butt, without causing any unwanted bar input, unstable lower body lock, or excess fatigue - but for MOST riders, half a butt cheek is a much better starting point to create a stable, functional and effective body position. At the school we have a great off track exercise where we put a rider on a bike and work with them one-on-one to find a body position that works for them, along with educating them along the way about what is important about body position - what is the point of hanging off, how to do it (if desired), and how to get a good, comfortable, solid position that works, and then practice it. Just like you say above - knowing not only what to do, but also understanding why.
  15. The bowl is FUUUUNNNN, seems like the best place to get more speed, at least compared to the others you mentioned. It is scary as hell trying to go faster where you crest that hill, where it is blind and off- camber! Which direction were you riding the track, CCW?
  16. Hotfoot

    S1000RR Rear Suspension

    The data loggers are absolutely incredible in what they do, and small and easy to mount. If you really are interested in one, contact the school office at 800-530-3350. Slicks are really expensive and tires are one of the biggest expenses involved in track riding. If the data logger helps you find the problem with your tire wear (or gives you the info you need to take to your suspension guy or tire guy), it will pay for itself very quickly. The additional riding info that you get that will improve your laptimes will just be a bonus! Edit - BTW if you have a friend that has one, too, you can download your data and compare, creating a "virtual race" type thing where you can overlay your laps and see the differences - where you or your friend is getting on the gas earlier, carrying more speed, braking later, etc., and you can use your combined positive points to improve each other's laptimes. Or just bench race. Anyway it is really great and I highly recommend it!
  17. Hotfoot

    Crash Analysis

    Since the conditions were a bit wet, and tires were cold, it could be that the bike DID highside but just not as violently as in the video. I'm thinking that if the tire slid out to the rear, but then regained traction (perhaps over an oily patch on the pavement), it could flip it back over to the right but without that violent upward launch, because neither front nor rear tire would have as much grip as what we see in the video on dry pavement. However, I think the scenario John describes above sounds very plausible - even if the wheel just was lifted up a bit by the spring as you went over it, that could take away the resistance on the bars and your countersteering pressure (to lift the bike up out of its lean) would suddenly be too much and cause to the bars to turn too much to the left, so that as the tire lands back on the pavement it would countersteer you into the ground on the right, as John says above. I have had a similar experience on a dirt bike, hitting a round rock mostly hidden under some loose sand - I was leaned a bit to the left and coming up out of a turn, the front wheel was lifted up by the rock and when it came down it slammed me over on the right side. Did you have any sensation of the rear wheel slipping, sliding out, or coming around on you, or any recollection of the bars twisting, or of losing "feel" from the front tire?
  18. Hotfoot

    2017 Fleet Break In

    The bikes are already in service, the first school was in February. I don't think there was a need to reach out on the forum for volunteers this year.
  19. Hotfoot

    Anticipated 34 yrs ago, still not here

    Yeah, and where is my flying car? I'm sure we were supposed to have those by now.
  20. Hotfoot

    Rear Slides and Saves

    Yes it sounds like there may be some misunderstanding of the purpose and application of the pick up drill, and some pieces that are missing. I'll PM you and we will get it sorted out.:)
  21. Hotfoot

    Rear Slides and Saves

    What is your understanding of HOW to do the pickup? How it is different from simply countersteering out of a turn?
  22. Exactly. So does Schuberth, and I think AGV too.
  23. Hotfoot

    Rear Slides and Saves

    Points 1-4 is covered specifically and in detail in Twist of the Wrist II in Chapter 10: Rider Input, Riding and Sliding. There is a good diagram and description of what the front wheel and the bars will do in a slide, which way they will turn. It also tells you exactly what happens if the rider tries to turn the bars or gives the opposite input. It is better read there than answered here, since there is a thorough explanation, diagram and photo. In regards to your second set of questions - yes the slide would be in the same direction - the angular momentum of the bike would send the rear wheel to the outside of the curve. If the bike is nearly vertical, you are not on a circular trajectory anymore. The front wheel will still turn the same direction as your scenarios above (as described in TOTW II), but if you are mostly upright it wouldn't be much, because at that point you are going mostly straight. The pick up will improve your traction by getting the bike more upright. However it is always possible to upset the chassis or suspension with an overly aggressive bar input; it would seem very unlikely especially in good traction conditions for it to actually cause a crash but possibly if you seriously overloaded the front suspension with a really heavy bar input, way oversteered it, OR unintentionally braced with your other arm thereby loading BOTH bars and creating a rigid transfer point between the bars and your body (and thus the rest of the bike) you could cause a wobble or an unwanted bounce from the front suspension or tire. If a rider tries to do a really aggressive, fast pick up right around the moment where he/she is trying to begin their roll-on, how likely is that the roll on itself will be smooth and progressive? If the roll-on is, as a result, too abrupt, what could happen to the rear tire traction?
  24. Hotfoot

    Steer for the Rear - Ch13 of TOTWII

    The guy on the Ducati would really benefit from CSS Level 3, check out his transitions across the bike (and how the bike reacts) and his lock on, how secure does his lower body look?
  25. Hotfoot

    Steer for the Rear - Ch13 of TOTWII

    Here's some hints on these rear tires slides: LISTEN to the engine, how smooth is the throttle application when leaned over? Watch the rider on the R1s throttle hand - what does he do when the rear tire starts to slide? What control could a rider be using that could cause the rear tire to slide on the entry? What could a rider do on the corner exit that would cause the rear tire to be under much greater load than the front? I'd also ask - especially in the case of the black guy on the black bike near the beginning of the video - what is the condition of the tires, and are they adequately warmed up?
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