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Front End Feedback


Jaybird180
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I was thinking about a particular distraction (barrier) and hoping for some advice on how to overcome it. I realized that I put an excessive amount of attention on front-end feedback. In looking back at some of the ridiculous things I've done, they've all been in search of easing my mind that the front tire is indeed in contact with the ground.

 

This need for constant reassurance has caused me to:

1- Look down

2- Put extra weight on the bars

3- Slow entry speed

4- Reluctant to get on the gas

5- Fail to quick turn

6- Quicken rebound damping

7- Stiffen compression damping

 

I'm sure my bike can work better; it's setup pretty stiff at the moment. I don't have the same issue with the rear end. I don't have to put any feedback attention on it and could probably use less feedback.

 

What parts of the CSS curriculum will help me overcome this need for reassurance?

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I was thinking about a particular distraction (barrier) and hoping for some advice on how to overcome it. I realized that I put an excessive amount of attention on front-end feedback. In looking back at some of the ridiculous things I've done, they've all been in search of easing my mind that the front tire is indeed in contact with the ground.

 

This need for constant reassurance has caused me to:

1- Look down

2- Put extra weight on the bars

3- Slow entry speed

4- Reluctant to get on the gas

5- Fail to quick turn

6- Quicken rebound damping

7- Stiffen compression damping

 

I'm sure my bike can work better; it's setup pretty stiff at the moment. I don't have the same issue with the rear end. I don't have to put any feedback attention on it and could probably use less feedback.

 

What parts of the CSS curriculum will help me overcome this need for reassurance?

 

 

Jaybird, I had the same problem and when I started working on it I found that I was taking the attention off of my three step to focus on the front end. Once I realized that I was able to focus more on my three step and it helped me stop focusing on my front end feel and in turn also made me more comfortable with my front end. Do you know where you are pulling your attention from? Figuring out which of the other areas you are pulling from will help greatly in knowing how to get your attention off your front end and where it should be. Hope this helps brother.

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What parts of the CSS curriculum will help me overcome this need for reassurance?

JB;

Have you attended a School yet? If so, I would encourage you to review your notes from Level I because some of the classroom sessions deal with the forces on and the reaction of the bike's suspension system. Beyond that, I can't think of any level that deals with the set up of a student's bike per se. If you haven't attended I recommend that you sign up for the earliest school you can find in 2009. The School will sort this out for you in short order.

 

You mention that your reaction creates seven separate steps you take to alleviate your concern with the bike's front so you are halfway home in overcoming the issue - you have acknowledged it. Now the trick is how to put these regressive steps out of your riding repertoire so you can ride with greater confidence. I have some suggestions but you will be better served with advice from an experienced CSS Coach (Hint-hint Cobie, Stuman, Mike Isbill&...).

 

I do not mean to disuade you from the belief that your suspension is a problem; it could be the cause of all of your anxiety - One season as my speed and confidence began to grow I started having trouble with front end chatter under heavy braking and it did affect my confidence. I swapped out the fork springs and it changed everything freeing me to look for other areas to improve - so in fairness to your comment it could be all in the forks.

 

YRMV.

 

Kevin

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What parts of the CSS curriculum will help me overcome this need for reassurance?

JB;

Have you attended a School yet? If so, I would encourage you to review your notes from Level I because some of the classroom sessions deal with the forces on and the reaction of the bike's suspension system. Beyond that, I can't think of any level that deals with the set up of a student's bike per se. If you haven't attended I recommend that you sign up for the earliest school you can find in 2009. The School will sort this out for you in short order.

 

You mention that your reaction creates seven separate steps you take to alleviate your concern with the bike's front so you are halfway home in overcoming the issue - you have acknowledged it. Now the trick is how to put these regressive steps out of your riding repertoire so you can ride with greater confidence. I have some suggestions but you will be better served with advice from an experienced CSS Coach (Hint-hint Cobie, Stuman, Mike Isbill&...).

 

I do not mean to disuade you from the belief that your suspension is a problem; it could be the cause of all of your anxiety - One season as my speed and confidence began to grow I started having trouble with front end chatter under heavy braking and it did affect my confidence. I swapped out the fork springs and it changed everything freeing me to look for other areas to improve - so in fairness to your comment it could be all in the forks.

 

YRMV.

 

Kevin

Thank you for your kind words sir, but I'm sure the problem is the nut connecting the seat to the steering yoke.

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the problem is the nut connecting the seat to the steering yoke.

You might be on to something with that one. That nut is a real ###### to tighten correctly.

 

 

I agree! This sounds more like a perceived problem rather then a real one. When my front end pushes on any particular corner I either find a different line, use a different entry speed, hang off the bike more/lean less, put more weight on the front end or all of the above on the next lap at that corner. What ever you do, DO NOT LOOK AT THE FRONT WHEEL while turning. Unless of course you want to get up close and personal with the ground.

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It's is pretty important to stay loose on the bars for good feed back. Maybe thinking about staying loose will help you feel the front more?

Less, no?

I'm going to try some suspension adjustments. It's very plush...too plush for the amount of feedback I want in a straight line. In a corner it's great!

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