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Another Shameful Newbie....


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Okay; Mark from MS. Attended STAR in Florida a few years ago and CLASS in April. Took a track day with "Sportbike Track Time" at Barber last weekend and had to have the talk-get rid of bike or keep hacking at this riding thing, getting back on the track and picking up a few reference points that I was missing previously. However, Joe Rocket counterfeit leathers were extremely constricting and couldn't move much on the bike-not much fun. Rode in the rain for fun/experience and did okay.

 

My desire is to become a smoother, safer rider and know what works and what can be discarded-and will probably have questions upon questions-and no unless you're coming back to Barber this year will have be content to bug people for tutoring via this site!

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First of all; Howdy. Welcome to the site. Sounds like you have tons of riding education, and will be able to share some great experience. I'd love to know how consistent the other schools are in their information, and how it fits in place with what CSS teaches.

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Okay; Mark from MS. Attended STAR in Florida a few years ago and CLASS in April. Took a track day with "Sportbike Track Time" at Barber last weekend and had to have the talk-get rid of bike or keep hacking at this riding thing, getting back on the track and picking up a few reference points that I was missing previously. However, Joe Rocket counterfeit leathers were extremely constricting and couldn't move much on the bike-not much fun. Rode in the rain for fun/experience and did okay.

 

My desire is to become a smoother, safer rider and know what works and what can be discarded-and will probably have questions upon questions-and no unless you're coming back to Barber this year will have be content to bug people for tutoring via this site!

 

That's something I'm sorting out a bit. I think my attraction toward this work at the California Superbike School is to get through some of the "mess" of how to apply things. I rode over yesterday (it was hot!) to an event about forty miles away and just tried to concentrate on keeping input off of the bike-by that I mean a soft touch on the bars, and smooth braking and shifting. I had been trying some hanging off but I found that it was just screwing with my riding at most speeds and just subtly moving my body weight inboards a bit and pressure on that peg allowed the bike to track well and predictably. I think the rub of obtaining good instruction is discernment on the part of the potential instructee on whether those that know how to ride giving that information to others in a format they can understand and apply.

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Hi Markster,

 

Good observation on your part, the method used to transfer the information is really critical. One reason I have to look for coaches that can be trained in what Keith has researched.

 

Interstingly enough, the different training done by the coaches at the school reflects that Keith has found different techniques are used in different situations. Example, one technique is used for on-track coaching, while another style method is used off track (Steering Drill, Lean Bike, etc.).

 

Best,

Cobie

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Hi Markster,

 

Good observation on your part, the method used to transfer the information is really critical. One reason I have to look for coaches that can be trained in what Keith has researched.

 

Interstingly enough, the different training done by the coaches at the school reflects that Keith has found different techniques are used in different situations. Example, one technique is used for on-track coaching, while another style method is used off track (Steering Drill, Lean Bike, etc.).

 

Best,

Cobie

 

Thank you for input, Cobie! Flipping through a couple of Keith's books at the local Barnes and Noble, I thought much of it was too technical; however, I found it actually started me thinking about deciding where I wanted to go into a corner and where I wanted to apex. I noticed one thing in my daily commute; on hard turns where I have to slow substancially if I squeeze the gas tank with my legs and keep my arms relaxed, look into where I'm turning with relaxed arms the bike navigates the turn easily and is less finicky on the throttle. I think my previous problem with this relatively simple task was tension in the arms causing the bike to fight me in the turn and the jerky throttle was a symptom of tension in my arms. However, I have to add that later in the day, after working, keeping relaxed is easier said than done!

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Funny you should say that, Mark. At the end of the day I sort of take advantage of being tired, get off the gas, and work on relaxing. Nothing better at the end of a hard ridden day than relaxing. Depending on the time of year, it gets REALLY hot here, even September/October time frame, I cruise the last couple of sessions working on taking pressure off the bars.

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Wasn't until I worked here that I understood why when I was working contstruction, tired as a raced dog at the end of the day, and the bike worked pretty well, some of my best rides.

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