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Pivot Technigue!


Guest IgnativsElvis
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Guest IgnativsElvis

Been to Level 1 & 2, as well as Code Race. Took a ton away, during every step.

 

Stituation: Finished the Star school a few weeks ago, and Pridmore seemed to focus on the Pivot method of setting up for a turn. In a nut shell, you pivot your hips around the tank, which puts your body in a position to better balance the bike in the turn. Also, one of his lead instructors advised that you shouldn't use the bikes seat. You should be on the balls of your feet 90% of the time while on the track.

 

Question: I understand that everyone has a different riding style, but I'm curious on what Keith has to say about this technique. Balancing your weight makes sense, as well as using the tank (which can't be helped). Should you always be on the pegs, or are there times when weighting the seat, in a consistent manner of course, actually helps the bike carve the turn? I also felt very "crossed up" when using this technique. Any thoughts?

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Personally, I don't like the stay off the seat ideology..... the bike feels waaay too unstable. The first time I tried it was out in the canyons, and let's just say it was a pucker moment. I prefer to slidefrom side to side, then, once slide over, twist the hips to get locked in. My inside foot is close to the balls and my outside is closer to the middle of the instep. I found a youtube video, that explains a knee-to-knee technique, which I thinks gives the most stability.

 

Of course, wait for the experts. I just don't like the instability feeling.

 

One more thing popped in my head. It's been said the bars are for controlling the bike, not for holding on. Something I learned in the military - 3 points of contact gives you the most stability and security. Taking both these statements mixed in with 'balls of foot' theory, suggests that it is not the best method; as your only 2 points of contact are your feet, but adding your butt sliding across the seat adds that thrid contact point.

 

 

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I always stay in line with the bike, but I can relate to the instability thing; standing on the pegs with my bum half an inch above the seat in a straight line, my Daytona is all over the place, very unstable. I have pucker moments just thinking about doing it while cornering.

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Good news and bad news on this answer: the complete answer is in Level 3, that's pretty much the whole day and what it is devoted to. I'm not trying to just shamelessly pitch the school, but to indicate that there are a number of pieces to this subject of anchoring to the bike and moving around on it, and we wouldn't get anything like a correct and thorough answer up here with a few posts.

 

But if even the just info from Twist 2 is looked at, the data on rider input will answer what is going to happen if the rider is using the bars to hold on to the bike.

 

I keep wanting to jump into this deeper...but it just opens a whole can of worms that can't be really answered, and just don't like giving partial/half-assed answers.

 

Best,

CF

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