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Recovering Fro Smash


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Hi

I am on the recovery trail from being involved in a serious road traffic accident: 5 weeks in hospital, fractured pelvis, detached stomach muscles,torn Aductors and serious bruising to thelower back and right shoulder. I amnow in my third month of non-weight bearing and can even carry a cup of coffee from one room to another, its a real "ball breaker". Accident happened on the evening of Feb 8th 2011,in Kilburn, London. I try and try to recount my steps to see if there was something I could have done differently, but alas NO! I was in an overtaking manouvre on seriously slow moving traffic when a gap appeared and a car being allowed to enter the traffic flow shot through and stopped in my path. The rest as they say is history.

 

I have read and heard only good things about this forum. I wish to learn from my accident and make people aware to expect the unexpected. So for the next few months I must be content on reading and living my dream of getting back on board the bike. It will need to be a new bike as mine was a write-off.

 

When its time to get back on I have decided to get some training in and get my skills re-evaluated and not allow this to happen again. One thing I will definately do is get good quality riding equipment. Unfortunately some of what I was wearing needed to be cut off me. I always remember a Nurse stating: if you were not wearing such good quality equipment, you would be in a much worse situation". So no expense will be spared on my new equipment and being seen.

 

My spellchecker is not working so hopefully I have not done too bad lol

 

Spencer

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Sorry to here about your accident. I hope you recover with no lasting ill effects. I to had an accident on the street but not nearly as severe as your's, a broken wrist, knee and ankle injuries, road rash. I do not ride on the street anymore, track only. I do not have to worry about people texting, drinking, putting on makeup, distracted by kids or talking on their cell. This is a good forum and the people who are on it are friendly and knowledgeable. I wish you the best in your recovery.

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Welcome Spencer! I am also sorry to hear about your accident. Sometimes you can do everything right and the other guy just doesn't give you a chance. I sincerely hope you make a full recovery.

 

This is a great forum with a lot of very knowledgeable and helpful folks so jump right in and join the fray. To start with, tell us about you and your riding. What do you ride and what are your goals for improvement? Are you planning to or do you ride the track or are you just trying to make yourself a better street rider? Either way the folks here will be glad to offer up advice, opinions, and even the occasional comic relief. biggrin.gif

 

Good luck with the continued recuperation!

 

Best,

Carey

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Sorry to hear about your accident. Having suffered a number af smashes myself - I think I made a list of them here earlier - I can say that it took me many years to accept that had the majority control over my own faith. Sure, others were at fault a couple of times according to the law, but since I was the soft part that got hurt it would have been wise to have acted smarter. By that I mean always expecting the others to make mistakes and act accordingly. In traffic, I constantly ask myself "What ifs". What if that driver changes lane right now? What if that driver jumps into traffic without warning? What if I place myself here? What if that car just stops dead now? What if that driver hates motorcycles and will deliberately swerve to push me off line if I try to pass? That sort of thing. Looking for escape routes, keeping distance to erratic drivers or those I fear are not aware of me will greatly reduce the chance of getting involved in an accident.

 

We all make mistakes. The fewer we make and the more we expect others to make, the greater our chance of survival. You may well have done everything right, yet still have found yourself in an unavoidable situation. Or maybe with time you'll see that you could have been a little more cautious. Only you hold the answer to that. No matter what, I hope that you have a speedy and most of all full recovery!

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Dear Spencer,

 

Sorry to hear about your accident. You were smart to wear high quality protective gear. When you are ready for a new bike, you might consider one with protective features. The BMW R1000RR has driving modes, traction control and ABS. So do some sport touring bikes like the Multistrada 1200. The Suzuki Burgman Executive may be the easiest and safest bike for someone who is hurting or who has strict physical limits.

 

I hope you will give yourself the gift of time. Sometimes it is enough to just keep breathing.

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Hi Spencer,

 

Welcome to the forum. I'm sorry to hear of your smash, it's not the best, and can be difficult at times, working through the emotional lows of a big crash can be tricky, and something I've been through myself a few times over the years, sometimes from bikes, sometimes from other stupid antics I've had a go at. None of them have been through an accident like yours though, though it's good to hear/read you're going to get back on the horse, (so to speak) and ride again. Commedable attitude I have to say.

 

So, in the meantime, whilst your in convalesence, have a look around, read the threads,and ask questions. we're a friendly bunch on here, some great insight is available, both from coaches and riders, and I hope it'll help you pass the hours before you get back on your beloved two wheels.

 

Bullet

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we're a friendly bunch on here

 

plus me :unsure::P:D

He's a friendly and helpful guy too. ;) (just don't always take his word as the definitive answer) :lol:

 

Bullet

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  • 2 months later...

Hi Spencer, I appreciate I am chiming in a little late. Hope the recovery is proceeding and you are still wanting to get back on the horse.

My thought for was regarding training, if I read it right you were in London. If that is the case then I would suggest looking up your local iam ( institute of advanced motirists ) group or perhaps rospa ( royal society for the prevention of accidents) . It really isnt all chaps in flouro jackets, more like a group of enthusiasts combined with some of the best road training in the world. You could do bikesmart, but I think a full course may be the better option. It could help, not only with the road riding training aspect, but also with the post accident confidence factor , that I am sure we have all felt at one point or another. Let us know how you are doing.

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