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Own Bike For Css!


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Hello everyone,

 

 

New here, been riding crusiers for 10 years and recently bought a 2011 GSXR 750. I plan on signing up for CSS level 1 class in March 2012. Due to expense I will have to use my own bike for school. I live in Palmdale Ca, about 30 miles from Streets of Willow. My bike is bone stock, what will I have to do to my bike to use it for the school? Is there anything as far as tools or materials I will need to bring or can I get support there? What added expense if any should I expect to be able to use my own bike? I've been collecting my own riding/safety gear, pay check by pay check, so I should be covered by March.

 

 

 

Thanks in advance,

 

 

T.

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Hello everyone,

 

 

New here, been riding crusiers for 10 years and recently bought a 2011 GSXR 750. I plan on signing up for CSS level 1 class in March 2012. Due to expense I will have to use my own bike for school. I live in Palmdale Ca, about 30 miles from Streets of Willow. My bike is bone stock, what will I have to do to my bike to use it for the school? Is there anything as far as tools or materials I will need to bring or can I get support there? What added expense if any should I expect to be able to use my own bike? I've been collecting my own riding/safety gear, pay check by pay check, so I should be covered by March.

 

 

 

Thanks in advance,

 

 

T.

Check your brake pads, tires, chain and sprockets for excessive wear. Adjust any loose cables, connectors, chain, etc., and then tape over your lights, signals, reflectors, and mirrors. All that's left is to pay for your gas. I don't recall correctly if there are gas pumps at Streets. I'd bring a gas can if possible, but I'm thinking they have gas for sale at the track.

 

Aside from some personal medical troubles, my trip to Streets back in Oct was a great deal of fun. It's a nice track and I'm sure you'll enjoy the experience.

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  • 2 weeks later...

One of the first things they tell you is that you won't be riding at 100%, nowhere near in fact, otherwise you won't have any attention left for learning. Consequently the day is pretty easy on your bike, and you could turn up on ust about anything that's been properly looked after.

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Gas isn't available at the track normally, ideally you would bring some.

 

A bike in good working order is all that is needed, with good tires being about the most important item typically.

 

There is a tire deal, for students that are registered, and the option to get them put on that day is possible. Ideally you would set that up in advance with us, but can be done then and there (do it early!).

 

Best,

Cobie

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I actually enjoyed riding my own bike when I attended level 1; I believe it allowed me to concentrate better on the riding drills without having to worry about learning a different bike..... Having said that, after speaking with some friends who rented bikes at the school, it seems as though riding the BMW is akin to an out of body experience!

 

So I'll be sure to rent a bike on my next outing!!!!!

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  • 3 weeks later...

I would say unless you plan on taking your bike to the tracks I would just use CSS. Their bikes are already set up for the track. Now if you use your bike on the tracks, I can see were you would want to use yours so you can become 1 with your own bike. Other than that, hands down use that BMW you will thank me if you have a rainy day on the track. Traction control is awesome when the track is wet...

 

Pat

 

 

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I would say unless you plan on taking your bike to the tracks I would just use CSS. Their bikes are already set up for the track. Now if you use your bike on the tracks, I can see were you would want to use yours so you can become 1 with your own bike. Other than that, hands down use that BMW you will thank me if you have a rainy day on the track. Traction control is awesome when the track is wet...

 

Pat

 

There is another plus to riding ours too: they handle pretty darn well. Knowing what a good bike feels like, one can then compare that to his/her bike. What is trained at the school works on any bike, it's not bike specific.

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There is another plus to riding ours too: they handle pretty darn well. Knowing what a good bike feels like, one can then compare that to his/her bike. What is trained at the school works on any bike, it's not bike specific.

 

 

"Pretty darn well" You can say that again....I was able to stay upright in off turn 9 at NJMP during our wet track training,got out of the mudd and finished the session...

The turn 9 Villas look good from up close track side ;)

And yes that was a prime exemple of target fixation.. I didn't do that twice.

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Repeatly hearing that skills learned on one bike transfer over to other bikes is refreshing.....and is what I'm counting on.

 

Because coming to a twin after starting to really gain confidence in myself on an I4 is messing with my head. If the skills learned and practiced during CSS on an S1000RR help gain on-track confidence in my 848, that alone will be worth the price!

 

-Christian

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Repeatly hearing that skills learned on one bike transfer over to other bikes is refreshing.....and is what I'm counting on.

 

Because coming to a twin after starting to really gain confidence in myself on an I4 is messing with my head. If the skills learned and practiced during CSS on an S1000RR help gain on-track confidence in my 848, that alone will be worth the price!

 

-Christian

Christian;

The skills learned at CSS will translate no matter what bike you ride but a rider still needs to apply them to the particular bike they're on. Obviously a 125 is different from a liter bike and so too an L-2 from an I-4 . You probably already know that your Ducati's torque curve (line really) delivers power much differently than an in-line 4 does and Ducati's typically don't turn as quickly as I-4's do; and I find a Ducati's throttle to be more like a rheostat that can be difficult to modulate at low speeds. Having attended a bunch of CSS events on my Ducati and then on their ZX-6R's and now their S1000R's it took me a few times before the transition between the two types became seamless but you may get it on your first time. Knowing this beforehand should give you an edge because I wasn't smart enough to even ask the question before I attended.

 

BTW, you'll do fine.

 

Rainman

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I appreciate the personal experience and discovery, man! Yeah, I was only mentally thinking of the braking and torque difference when I decided to move from the GSX-R600 to the 848....found out there were many more characteristic differences between the two after doing an ARC on a tight & technical road course with the Duc, lol.

 

The only thing that would make the upcoming CSS experience better for me would be if I could transport my bike out there for the 2 levels I'm doing.

 

-Christian

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