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Hello everyone,

 

I found this forum after watching ATOTW II and it really looks like some good info and people here. I have been riding since I was 15 (46 now) but since my first trip to the Dragon last year I came to realization that I certainly don't know a fraction of what I thought I knew. At present NJ and VA are the closest places I could attend CSS so I am not sure if I will be able to go this year. However, here at New Hampshire Motor Speedway there is the Total Control (ARC) classes that I could take in the meantime. I have a few questions so will get right to it. First, if I take the first Total Control course would I still want to start with level 1 of CSS or would I get more out of it starting at level 2? Second, I have two bikes an 02 FZ1 and an 07 SV650. Which of those would be best for taking the course or does it even matter? And lastly, why no classes here at the NH Speedway? Thanks and I look forward to making some new friends.

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Hello everyone,

 

I found this forum after watching ATOTW II and it really looks like some good info and people here. I have been riding since I was 15 (46 now) but since my first trip to the Dragon last year I came to realization that I certainly don't know a fraction of what I thought I knew. At present NJ and VA are the closest places I could attend CSS so I am not sure if I will be able to go this year. However, here at New Hampshire Motor Speedway there is the Total Control (ARC) classes that I could take in the meantime. I have a few questions so will get right to it. First, if I take the first Total Control course would I still want to start with level 1 of CSS or would I get more out of it starting at level 2? Second, I have two bikes an 02 FZ1 and an 07 SV650. Which of those would be best for taking the course or does it even matter? And lastly, why no classes here at the NH Speedway? Thanks and I look forward to making some new friends.

 

Jeff;

Welcome to the Forum!

 

ATOTW II video is an excellent start but The TOTW Vols. 1 & 2 are also strong reference books for you to consider as well. Many of us read sections of these over and over, especially where there is one particular area of our riding that we think needs attention. We can go to the chapters of either book to better understand what may be holding us back. As for which level you should start at - it is the most commonly asked question of new members bar none; I think because the School uses a numeric system to identify the Levels. That said it is like secondary school in that everyone starts at Level I. It's not because everyone at level I has the same level of experience and/or skill sets, it's that Level I is the foundation of all that Keith Code and his team teach and it is needed for you to begin to integrate what they have to offer. Level II builds upon that base and continues onward from there.

 

As for why the School isn't coming to NHIS this year, I can't speak for the School but I do know that assembling the schedule every year is a really challenging assignment for the School. The whole year offers venues from Coast to Coast and the travel to all of the different tracks must mesh with open dates at those tracks along with a myriad of other logistical issues. The east coast swings (usually two per year) in particular have to be coordinated pretty tightly. I believe it comes down to available dates within their designated travel time, travel distance between venues, hotel accommodations for the staff among many other things. In the past eleven years I have seen some tracks added and some drop off, some come back and some don't. VIR is the only east coast track I can think of that has been a constant since 2001 when I attended my first School at Watkins Glen.

 

As for which bike - which ever one you feel most comfortable on - either will work just fine.

 

Let us know if you will be at NJMP or VIR this year.

 

 

Rainman

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Thanks Kevin,

 

I might be able to squeeze in a late summer trip, but I have a lot going on in may and a Dragon trip in june though so not sure yet. Would it be worth taking the Total Control courses since it is local (15minutes from me) or should I just get the books and then take CSS when I can?

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Would it be worth taking the Total Control courses since it is local (15minutes from me) or should I just get the books and then take CSS when I can?

Jeff;

I don't know ANYTHING about Totoal Control course so I can't offer an opinion. Regardless, I do recommend the books because if you want to understand what is taught at CSS, you will find much of it in them. Having read them before attending made it much easier for me to comprehend what is taught at the School as the day is broken down to: classroom instruction; followed by your practicing the drill you learned in your briefing but now on the bike on the track and with your track coach's supervision. Then you come in and have a debrief with your coach, get some rest and then you go right back thru the cycle with another briefing and a new drill to practice...

 

The School is without question one of the best places you can go to learn the Art of Cornering; that said, any instruction that makes you a more proficient rider can't hurt. I will offer one bit of caution; be wary of free (and many times unsolicited) advice at track days. DAMHIK!

 

Rainman

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Thanks for the advice; point taken. Looking over the other course curriculum it seems to cover many of the same things, I guess my concern would be I would hate to learn one way then find out that is much different at the CSS classes. Maybe someone who knows more about it can say if it would conflict with the CSS classes. I would hate to throw away the money if it does. I will order those books this week, and I am looking forward to reading them. I am also stoked to try out some things that were in the DVD but I work two LONG days on the weekends and Monday looks like rain :(

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Jeff,

 

Welcome to the forum! I just noticed your questions about taking other courses, and wanted to jump in... I would say that if you can't get to CSS, then yes definitely take rider training of some kind. That's certainly what I did before completing Level 1 at CSS. I had done about 4 track days with tuition (the same as a regular track day, but with an instructor on track and then classroom debriefs after each session, also a couple of "roadcraft" type courses, and also an "advanced rider" course on a private closed road course. That was all well and good, I picked up something from each of those. But then I did CSS. By far CSS is the most comprehensive and beneficial of all the training that I've done. And I think that says alot given the amount of previous training I've had - Level 1 gave me more benefit than nearly all the others combined. That's not to say that the others were bad, but CSS is just that great!

 

You mentioned Total Control, that's Lee Parks, right? I don't know about his course, but I have his book and can recommend that just on the basis of the sections that touch on the mental side of riding (if you're interested in that kind of thing).

 

I'm not sure that Total Control would teach things that are "wrong" (although I can't be sure), but it's interesting to note that Parks openly admits in his book that alot (if not all) of the riding technology and terminology that he and others use were developed by Keith Code.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Cheers,

 

Conrad

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Hi Jeff,

 

Welcome to the forum! I just noticed your questions about taking other courses, and wanted to jump in... I would say that if you can't get to CSS, then yes definitely take rider training of some kind. That's certainly what I did before completing Level 1 at CSS. I had done about 4 track days with tuition (the same as a regular track day, but with an instructor on track and then classroom debriefs after each session, also a couple of "roadcraft" type courses, and also an "advanced rider" course on a private closed road course. That was all well and good, I picked up something from each of those. But then I did CSS. By far CSS is the most comprehensive and beneficial of all the training that I've done. And I think that says alot given the amount of previous training I've had - Level 1 gave me more benefit than nearly all the others combined. That's not to say that the others were bad, but CSS is just that great!

 

You mentioned Total Control, that's Lee Parks, right? I don't know about his course, but I have his book and can recommend that just on the basis of the sections that touch on the mental side of riding (if you're interested in that kind of thing).

 

I'm not sure that Total Control would teach things that are "wrong" (although I can't be sure), but it's interesting to note that Parks openly admits in his book that alot (if not all) of the riding technology and terminology that he and others use were developed by Keith Code.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Cheers,

 

Conrad

 

 

Thanks, and yes it is the Lee Parks course. I think that I have made up my mind to take CSS only at this time. I am hoping to get to VIR in Aug for at least level 1. Just have to see if timing with work and finances are going to work out. In the mean time I have been reading the book and it is great info.

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