Jump to content

Does This Training Program Still Exist?


Recommended Posts

The Marine Corps contracts with CSS to deliver a program called Advanced Motorcycle Operator School (AMOS) which definitely does much of what was described. I'll assume for the moment that the quote is referring to AMOS. AMOS was unquestionably the best street riding training I ever received. I in fact did AMOS twice because it's that good. However, I don't believe this training is available other than through the military connection.

 

CSS also developed a second program used by the Marine Corps, called Advanced Rider Track Day (ARTD). ARTD is great but is just a piece of what is delivered in AMOS. CSS trains volunteer coaches - military members and a few retirees and civilians - to run the ARTD program under the supervision of a CSS Coach, usually Pete Castanik and sometimes Dylan Code.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

“good” advice gets passed around like a bottle of Mad Dog in a homeless camp.

 

That was worth a chuckle. Our Mr. Code does have a way with words.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

AMOS is completely different from the MSF sportbike rider course. MSRC (it actually has a new title which I can't recall) as I experienced it was mainly a refresher of basic MSF training but with a sportbike theme. AMOS is essentially Level One of California Superbike School and some other elements, but oriented to street vice track riding. More to follow when I'm not typing on the iPhone in the airport.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Adding to my post from yesterday...

 

AMOS starts with intro and tech briefs by Dylan. The riders are assigned to coaches (typically 1 coach to 5 students) and begin a series of steering drills. A couple additional tech briefs are given during the day, often by Dylan, but sometimes by other senior CSS coaches. Mid-day the focus moves from steering to braking. Students do a series of braking drills to establish baseline braking distances, then they get to ride the CSS brake rig. If time permits, the students do the braking drills again; otherwise the next morning is the second round of braking drills. Dramatic braking distance improvements are the norm. Students typically get a chance to ride the no-BS bike and the lean bike, either later on day one or else on day two. Day two then is 5-6 tech briefs and each brief is followed by a riding session on a small road course. Tech briefs generally follow the CSS Level 1 topics but with street themes. The road course is designed to present a few different challenges to the students (esses, decreasing radius, double apex, etc). CSS coaches observe the students ride the road course and flag-in riders as necessary to coach them on their riding.

 

ARTD is a similar but lesser version of day two of AMOS. Typically Pete Castanik supervises ARTDs (in NC at least), but the coaching all is done by CSS certified volunteer military coaches (such as myself). Riders get 3-4 riding sessions and with some briefs in between. Similar to AMOS, during the riding sessions the coaches observe the students ride the road course and flag-in riders as necessary to coach them on their riding. (ARTD coaches have a specific training program to follow, but often we would pair with CSS coaches at AMOS and it was a tremendous experience working with them in this manner.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...