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How To Practice Pivot Steering Away From The Track


apextc
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I'm a newbie hoping someday to take CSS but for I do track days in the Chicago area during the 5 months of summer that we have. I am learning from great coaches we have with sportbiketracktime.com and have learned plenty from this forum. AMAZING WORK, KUDO's to the team!

 

My question:

 

How can I practice offline steering the motorcycle using pivot points ? On a bicycle or even on the streets.

 

I know there is a difference of opinion where riders swear by it to corner and others counter steer by pushing or pulling on the bar. I'm having a hard time on corners pivoting and weighting the inside peg- i apply a lot of pressure where I get sore after 4/8 sessions.

 

 

 

 

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Hi ApexTC,

 

Let's break this down as the first step. How is the bike steered into the turn (or once turned up and out, or right into the next turn).

 

What's your understanding of how the bike changes direction?

 

CF

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Hi Cobie, this is what I have done from reading Twist of the Wrist 2, watching the DVD, listening to the coaches (some former AMA riders) and from experience.

 

Scenario: A right hand turn on a track. My reference points are either on the ground or the 4, 3, 2 , 1 markers that car drivers use

 

Checklist:

 

1.Coming down the straight I ensure my crotch is a few inches from the tank

2. Squeeze tank and brake

3. get lowER (squat position on the bike)

4. freeze/lock the throttle

5. Push on right handle bar

6. Dig left thigh on gas tank

7. Twist right foot and rest heel on swing arm (I dont have rear sets but investigating as a newbie who's been on the track n 5 times so far if I should get them - i posted a separate post on this)

8. Kiss the right mirror, drop elbow

9. Look where I want to go

10. I hit the apex and apply pressure on my left foot and use the left knee to come back up (sort of like the kneee to knee technique)

 

the key in doing all this is thinking to myself - SMOOTH

 

 

Hope I explained myself well. thank you very much for responding in advance !!!

 

-Farhan

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Let's break this down as the first step. How is the bike steered into the turn (or once turned up and out, or right into the next turn).

by applying gentle pressure on the inside handlebar. In my case making a right turn, I apply pressure to the right handlebar grip and as the big turns I dig my left thigh onto the side cavity/stomp grip, twist the ball of my foot so that my heel rests on my rear sets by the swing arm, right elbow dropped and me acting like im kissing the rear view mirror while looking where I want to go.

 

What's your understanding of how the bike changes direction?

counter steering is what I have tried and am comfortable with. I have however tried the following in an open parking lot: going in a straight line at 25-30mph and move by upper body smoothly left to right applying pressure to the gas tank. I did notice my bike being steered but dont know if that will work on a bend going 45mph then hanging off etc etc

 

 

thank you for responding in advance.

CF

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OK so a question for you based on your scenario,

 

I assume for #5 by push on the handle bar you mean steer the bike,

 

Why do you do this before you lock onto the bike with your left thigh ?

 

great question. I don't know why specifically but I can tell you how I might have developed the habit.

 

DISCLAIMER: no pun intended to any of the coaches.

 

I was told as a newbie( I've only done 5 track days) to first learn the basics in the first 4 sessions like lines, reference points, entry/exit points etc. That being said i was told every one develops their own unique style of riding and at some point do whats comfy for you. So when taking notes on body positioning and advised to try and set up for a corner and to get in position FIRST (then move your upper body into the turn, apply pressure on the bar then steer with confidence)

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I was told as a newbie( I've only done 5 track days) to first learn the basics in the first 4 sessions like lines, reference points, entry/exit points etc. That being said i was told every one develops their own unique style of riding and at some point do whats comfy for you. So when taking notes on body positioning and advised to try and set up for a corner and to get in position FIRST (then move your upper body into the turn, apply pressure on the bar then steer with confidence)

 

 

So I'm a little confused by your response,

 

Your setting up for the corner before you initiate your steering input, but you don't dig your knee into the gas tank until after you steer the bike ?

 

How do you support your upper body weight ? If feasible, can you put the bike on stands, shift into your mid corner body position and let go of the clip on's entirely ?

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I was told as a newbie( I've only done 5 track days) to first learn the basics in the first 4 sessions like lines, reference points, entry/exit points etc. That being said i was told every one develops their own unique style of riding and at some point do whats comfy for you. So when taking notes on body positioning and advised to try and set up for a corner and to get in position FIRST (then move your upper body into the turn, apply pressure on the bar then steer with confidence)

 

 

So I'm a little confused by your response,

 

Your setting up for the corner before you initiate your steering input, but you don't dig your knee into the gas tank until after you steer the bike ?

 

T-McKeen - first of all thank you for responding.

 

That is correct... that's what I've done on the last track day when I learned it. Shall I try something different?

 

How do you support your upper body weight ? If feasible, can you put the bike on stands, shift into your mid corner body position and let go of the clip on's entirely ?

 

This is not the coach in the chicagoland area but this is what I practice:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWMouUQvVSY

 

 

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sorry I've been a little busy and haven't had a chance to respond to this,

 

One of the key things that CSS teaches is to always have a good solid lock on the tank with your lower body, this allows you to move around the bike and support your upper body without using the clip on's at all, very similar to the video you posted. The technique taught by CSS is to push your outside knee and thigh up into the tank by lifting your outside foot, by obtaining a good solid lock with your outside leg you can limit the weight you support with your inside foot and the fatigue that supporting all you weight in that manner can cause.

 

I personally do not use a foot position that pivots my heel into the swing arm, I used to wrench my heel up against the plate on my rear set but found that caused more fatigue in my calf's than it was worth and I no longer do that. this is really going to be a personal feel kind of thing, you have to find what works best for you and your bike.

 

I would recommend you try finding a good solid locked on position and set up for the corner and wrench your knee into the tank BEFORE your steering input

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sorry I've been a little busy and haven't had a chance to respond to this,

 

One of the key things that CSS teaches is to always have a good solid lock on the tank with your lower body, this allows you to move around the bike and support your upper body without using the clip on's at all, very similar to the video you posted. The technique taught by CSS is to push your outside knee and thigh up into the tank by lifting your outside foot, by obtaining a good solid lock with your outside leg you can limit the weight you support with your inside foot and the fatigue that supporting all you weight in that manner can cause.

 

I personally do not use a foot position that pivots my heel into the swing arm, I used to wrench my heel up against the plate on my rear set but found that caused more fatigue in my calf's than it was worth and I no longer do that. this is really going to be a personal feel kind of thing, you have to find what works best for you and your bike.

 

I would recommend you try finding a good solid locked on position and set up for the corner and wrench your knee into the tank BEFORE your steering input

 

 

 

thank you for responding. Can't wait to work on this next season !

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