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Is it better to learn on your own bike on the track, or is it better to mix it up and learn on a different bike like the s1000rr?   I’m currently riding a Triumph Bonneville with some performance and suspension upgrades here and there.  I love this bike and currently do not have any plans to pursue a street bike.  And my goal for the course is to be a better street rider on the twisties.  Should I be concerned about transferring what I learn from a type of bike I probably won’t ride except for this course?  Of course, I can bring the Bonnie for the 1-Day course but I’m worried I’ll show up with an inappropriate bike for the track.  Any thoughts?

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New2mac, welcome to the forum. I’d say that the skills learned at the school are very easily transferable back to your bike on the street. My first time at the school was on a school bike and I had no issues taking what I learned out to the street on my bike. 
 

I don’t know that it’s necessarily ’better’ to mix it up and learn on different bikes. I can imagine for some, getting on a sport bike when never having ridden one before may actually take away from focusing on the drills in each session (a lot of attention *could* necessarily go toward just getting accustomed to a new/different bike). Even if that’s the case, I’ve been to the school a bunch of times with a lot of non track/sport bike riders who gain a lot while riding the school bikes.  
 

The flip side is the time and energy you will necessarily and possibly expend on your bike while off track. Things like getting your bike track ready, getting it to the track, fueling your bike between sessions and possibly making any repairs or adjustments to your bike. Down time between sessions in the single day format is not significant (~20 minutes), though you would have time to do these things, you might feel rushed to attend to your needs + bike off track between sessions. 
 

Some people don’t realize how energy intensive track riding can be and if your not in track condition physically, just riding and learning all day can fill up your cup pretty easily. Riding a school bike allows you to just focus on learning, practicing the skills taught, digesting those skills and keeping your body hydrated and fueled. 
 

Either route you decide to go with, you’ll learn a lot and have a great time doing it. 

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Hi and welcome!

El Colibri covered it quite extensively above.  I would add that my first time at the school I used their bike but was apprehensive about riding a sportsbike as I thought it may detract from the learning experience, but they are excellent and surprisingly user-friendly ("pussycat" was the term used!)  This was the previous generation S1000RR - maybe someone else on here who has ridden the 2020 version has feedback on it?  During the first couple of sessions the bike is in 'Rain' mode (reduced power, more forgiving throttle response) and the option to move it up to 'Sport' mode is available later on but, to be honest, I left it in 'Rain' all day long during level one and two and got on perfectly with it.

With regards to the skills learned on a sports machine, they do transfer easily to other bikes and I've put them into practice on various ones -  Bonneville, ADV's, Enduro, Vintage and my 300 single.

Alternatively, you are familiar with your own bike so don't have to adjust to another one - there is no such thing as the 'wrong bike'!😉

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Thanks Vic. Great point about the bikes having different modes I can use to get comfortable with the bike. I’m thinking about renting a sports bike prior to the dates so I can get used to the riding position. Starting out with Rain mode is an excellent idea. 

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Your Bonneville will, obviously, feel more upright than the BMW RR but in your first session (assuming this is your first time at the school) the first couple of laps are slow-speed, follow-the-leader 'sighting laps' which allow one time to adjust to riding position anyway.  The first session is usually spent getting used to the track and lines, getting used to the bike, and still early in the day so tyre and track temperatures can still be cool - point being it's not worth going flat out immediately.  The coaches really know their stuff and are fantastic at looking after you so you will get a lot out of it whichever bike you ride.  

 

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