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Hello, heading to Vegas in Feb. 24


jamespz03

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Howdy. Heading up for a 2 day camp at Vegas. I'm a little nervous since it's been a couple of years since the last one. I have attended a total of 3 track days (2 at Chuckwalla and one at the old Auto Club Speedway.

Excited to spend a weekend at the track. Is there a fitness test I can work towards to ensure I can make the most out of this? Also curious what the typical make-up of a two day camp is like from a rider perspective. Is it a mix of first timers all the way to people hoping to get into racing? 

Thanks!
James

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Hi James,

Average age last time we checked was mid-40's, with many older than that.  Skill level can be variable, a mix, but we handle that by requiring polite passing (meaning not close), and individual coaching.  Meaning when your coach is working with you on track (and in the after ride debrief) he will be doing that specifically with you.  

The classroom briefings are done as a group (small after the first one), but all the coaching is tailored to what your coach is observing you do on track.

There is no fitness test, but being in good shape makes the days easier.  On that note, there are 2 things that have a big impact on how tired one can get:

First is staying ahead of the hydration.  Some don't realize how dry the desert is, and often water is not enough (I take electrolytes daily).  We have lots of stuff for that, but keeping ahead of that is crucial.

Next, thing is some try and over-ride their comfortable pace, and get tense.  This really wears one out.

Any questions, call or email me anytime: 800-530-3350.  cobie@superbikeschool.com

For sure come and say hello to me in the morning!

Best,

Cobie

 

 

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Hi James,

Yes we get quite a mix of riders and regularly get riders who have never been on a racetrack before. Fitness-wise, I have a few suggestions: Do some quad work, like squats, to strengthen your quadriceps muscles and some exercises to strengthen your inner thighs, the muscles you use to squeeze your knees together (think horseback riding or Suzanne Sommers ThighMaster machine), as you will be using your legs to lock on to the motorcycle. If you hang off and/or sit with your upper body low to the  motorcycle, you might want to do some exercises to strengthen your neck; one I do is this: bend over (back parallel to the floor) with your head/eyes looking down at the ground, then use your neck muscles to lift your head to look straight ahead (towards a wall, for example). I also do the same thing but raise my head and look left, then again to the right. This will exercise the muscles that you will be using to hold your head as you ride and the helmet adds a bit of weight so having some strength in those muscles helps.

The exercise bikes that have the arm bars that move forward and back are good, they exercise quad and calf muscles and help get the tricep muscles which get some use while steering the motorcycle.

Of course core workouts are terrific as well, as a strong core will support you while you ride.

I also agree completely with what Cobie said about riding at your own comfortable pace, that makes a world of difference. 

Come say hi to me, too - look for a female coach with long brown hair, that will be me, and if you have ridden at Auto Club you may have seen me out there too.

Looking forward to Vegas!

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18 hours ago, Hotfoot said:

Hi James,

Yes we get quite a mix of riders and regularly get riders who have never been on a racetrack before. Fitness-wise, I have a few suggestions: Do some quad work, like squats, to strengthen your quadriceps muscles and some exercises to strengthen your inner thighs, the muscles you use to squeeze your knees together (think horseback riding or Suzanne Sommers ThighMaster machine), as you will be using your legs to lock on to the motorcycle. If you hang off and/or sit with your upper body low to the  motorcycle, you might want to do some exercises to strengthen your neck; one I do is this: bend over (back parallel to the floor) with your head/eyes looking down at the ground, then use your neck muscles to lift your head to look straight ahead (towards a wall, for example). I also do the same thing but raise my head and look left, then again to the right. This will exercise the muscles that you will be using to hold your head as you ride and the helmet adds a bit of weight so having some strength in those muscles helps.

The exercise bikes that have the arm bars that move forward and back are good, they exercise quad and calf muscles and help get the tricep muscles which get some use while steering the motorcycle.

Of course core workouts are terrific as well, as a strong core will support you while you ride.

I also agree completely with what Cobie said about riding at your own comfortable pace, that makes a world of difference. 

Come say hi to me, too - look for a female coach with long brown hair, that will be me, and if you have ridden at Auto Club you may have seen me out there too.

Looking forward to Vegas!

Hi Cobie. Thanks for the great info and for offering further help. I'll keep an eye out for you and say hi.

 

 

19 hours ago, Cobie Fair said:

Hi James,

Average age last time we checked was mid-40's, with many older than that.  Skill level can be variable, a mix, but we handle that by requiring polite passing (meaning not close), and individual coaching.  Meaning when your coach is working with you on track (and in the after ride debrief) he will be doing that specifically with you.  

The classroom briefings are done as a group (small after the first one), but all the coaching is tailored to what your coach is observing you do on track.

There is no fitness test, but being in good shape makes the days easier.  On that note, there are 2 things that have a big impact on how tired one can get:

First is staying ahead of the hydration.  Some don't realize how dry the desert is, and often water is not enough (I take electrolytes daily).  We have lots of stuff for that, but keeping ahead of that is crucial.

Next, thing is some try and over-ride their comfortable pace, and get tense.  This really wears one out.

Any questions, call or email me anytime: 800-530-3350.  cobie@superbikeschool.com

For sure come and say hello to me in the morning!

Best,

Cobie

 

 

Hi Hotfoot. Thanks for saying Hi and I appreciate the information you provided and I'll make sure to say hello.  I feel like the last person to be using forums, I guess everything moved to social media.

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Social media is great for immediate short communications, but forums are still great for looking up conversations from others, to research questions, etc. This forum is an incredible resource, with loads of articles and a massive variety of student questions about school and riding. Who knows, with AI taking over so many areas and the glut of advertising on social media, forums might make a comeback. :) It sure is nice to be able to come here and have a real exchange of information with a real human without having to be bombarded with ads and other traffic.

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