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Head For Speed


twaym54
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I have done up to level 3 in the CSS school at Barber, and 6 other trackdays this season. I have one more scheduled this weekend, then its over for this year. The one thing that is still bugging me, that I want to think about over the winter, is how to gain confidence, and get some "head for speed." Is it the vision and "wideview" of lesson 4, level 2, and on page 88 of TWOT 2. or should I consider hypno therapy,(just kidding, maybe). Like the person who is satisfied with the intermediate slopes, making easy gradual turns, should I be satisfied with form and maybe the speed will come without any conscious effort? And if I run at the back of the pack, so be it.

Thanks for any opinions.

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I have done up to level 3 in the CSS school at Barber, and 6 other trackdays this season. I have one more scheduled this weekend, then its over for this year. The one thing that is still bugging me, that I want to think about over the winter, is how to gain confidence, and get some "head for speed." Is it the vision and "wideview" of lesson 4, level 2, and on page 88 of TWOT 2. or should I consider hypno therapy,(just kidding, maybe). Like the person who is satisfied with the intermediate slopes, making easy gradual turns, should I be satisfied with form and maybe the speed will come without any conscious effort? And if I run at the back of the pack, so be it.

Thanks for any opinions.

 

Michael;

 

My perspective is there are no "shortcuts" to excellence; I would encourage you to continue to integrate all of what you have been taught and then try and get as much seat time as you can.

 

A golfer who plays a dozen times a year limits their opportunities for improvement simply because they can't experience enough repetitions to "know" how to swing the different clubs the correct way for each given situation. The track offers similar kinds of challanges (off camber, diminishing radius, compound radius, negative G, positive G, esses, hairpins, kinks, bowls) that require that we all get as much practice on each to know how to react to these variable circumstances; circumstances which are further affected by temperature, moisture and the conditions of our suspensions and tires.

 

Keep at it, the more time you put into it, the better you will become. Now if I only practiced what I preach!

 

Kevin

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I have done up to level 3 in the CSS school at Barber, and 6 other trackdays this season. I have one more scheduled this weekend, then its over for this year. The one thing that is still bugging me, that I want to think about over the winter, is how to gain confidence, and get some "head for speed." Is it the vision and "wideview" of lesson 4, level 2, and on page 88 of TWOT 2. or should I consider hypno therapy,(just kidding, maybe). Like the person who is satisfied with the intermediate slopes, making easy gradual turns, should I be satisfied with form and maybe the speed will come without any conscious effort? And if I run at the back of the pack, so be it.

Thanks for any opinions.

 

michaelt54,

 

I'm going to be perfectly honest with you. It's none of the drills, skills and techniques we teach at the school--it's desire that fuels what you are looking for. There is no school better for that than going racing. I'd love to be able to tell you that it is something that I could provide for you but I can't do that, no one can.

 

When I decided to write Twist II I knew that the only way for me to get the data I was interested in was to go back out and race for a couple of seasons in competition that was tough. My idea was to put myself into a challenging environment that would make me reach down and find that desire so I could do the research I needed. It worked. I was being my own student, which is a challenge on its own because it is so difficult to be objective about your own riding. If I had a coach through that time it would have shortcut my improvement tremendously but I had the research in mind and that meant I had to do it on my own.

 

Track days are only 1/3 of the way to racing. Racing provides a very set format with a defined number of laps for you to do your thing. It has a way of installing the desire as a freebie, a by-product.

 

I might be talking myself out of a student but I think once you find that nitch of desire within yourself the training will make even more sense.

 

Keith

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Michael,

 

I think Keith summed that up nicely. It's a key element I look for in a good coach. Natuaral ability in a certain area can be an asset, but guys that I didn't think would be really top coaches have become so, and due to that desire Keith referenced. Intending to make a goal, and doing what it takes to make it there.

 

Best,

Cobie

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