Cobie Fair

2017 Riding Coach Search

18 posts in this topic

Dear All,

We are looking for qualified coach candidates. Following is a
description of we need, and after that an application.

If you are interested, or think you might qualify, please read the following
carefully, and return only the application (download here).


Regards,

Cobie Fair
Chief Riding Coach
California Superbike School


I'll see if I can summarize it in a few words what is needed by us:

1. Racing experience is preferred. Really we have to see the riding to
answer if the riding skill level will be adequate. Most of our students are
street riders, but we do need someone that can set an excellent example for a
broad range of skills.

2. Friendly, personable, upbeat, high ethical standards, fit in with the
rest of our team is a must.

3. Excellent communication and observation skills. Also willing to be
trained and do homework. The coach training is vigorous, not for the
wimpy. Every aspect of what you do is examined, honed, tested, and improved
on a regular basis.

4. The positions are part time for independent contractors but we need a
minimum of 10-15 school days per year.

5. Tryout is not paid. That is usually 1 day at a racetrack, you provide
your own bike and gear.

6. After the tryout, there is a short probation period, but we pay all
travel and other expenses, you use our bike, gear, etc. Probation period
depends on you and how much work you are putting into your training.

7. After probation, coaches are paid according to their instructor skill
level, how many of our training programs they have completed. Starts about
$150 per day, goes up from there.

Getting all these together in the same package is the hard part. Truthfully
we are a very dedicated, serious-about-being-the-best bunch, and it shows.
About 1 in 40 that apply even get accepted for the training, much less make
it past the probation stage. If you have it in mind that this is just a
prestigious job for you show others how well you ride, that it will be a cool
way to improve your own riding and get lots of track time, then this is not
the right thing for you, and your reasons for coming are not the same as ours.

We are a school, we train riders and racers and we do that totally. We don't
give jobs to our friends because we like them.

Download the application and email it to me.

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2017 is almost upon us...time to see about adding some coaches to the roster. Got a great crew now, but want to fill it out a bit more. The application is correct, but the dates are older, I'll get that updated shortly.

 

For the availability question, please use the 2017 calendar on the website!

 

Shoot me any questions: cobie@superbikeschool.com

 

Best,

Cobie

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Hi Cobie,

 

I am very interested in applying for a tryout in the UK; in fact, I have arranged to meet with the Chief Coach very soon. Are you able to advise on ways to prepare in order to increase my chances of success throughout the process please (I don't believe in leaving things to chance)?

 

Best regards

 

Mike

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Hi Mike,

 

The guys in the UK are great guys, and passionate about what they do (well, guess that goes for us too :D).

 

I'm not 100% sure of all the details of their current selection process, but I can tell you what we do here (and you are welcome to go to that thread and download our application). Initial interview, takes about an hour or so. Much of that is simply giving the candidate some idea of what he is getting into (most are not prepared for the level of homework required). Nothing really to do to prepare for that. But solid knowledge of the Keith Code's Books and DVD's is a real plus.

 

I look for someone that communicates very well, listens well, and looks like he'll be a good student--as he/she has to learn a ton to be a coach. Being in decent physical condition, able to handle long (and sometimes very hot) days is also needed.

 

Background is not a big issue, haven't found any skill/career/training that was a guarantee of a fit. Person has to be passionate about being a good coach, and isn't just there to show how cool he is, or how well he rides. Must of course ride at a very high skill level--sometimes we can help get them to that, but has to be there before we start the actual coach training. Too hard to learn how to be a CSS coach, and at the same time learn how to ride at that level. I do look for race experience, but if all other factors are in place, will accept one that hasn't. An overall cheery, hard working and upbeat attitude help.

 

Let me know if this helps!

 

Best,

Cobie

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Hi Cobie,

 

Thanks for your guidance - that was a very useful write-up!

 

I had a chat with Spidey yesterday at the Motorcycle Live show in Birmingham (UK). The fact that he took time out to discuss the process with me was no surprise; that's just the way the coaches are - always approachable and eager to help.

 

I intend to attend another Level 4 as soon as possible in 2017 where I also hope to continue the conversation. In the meantime my copy of Keith's books and DVD are going to get a serious hammering along with the drills workbooks issued on my own training days.

 

Once again Cobie, thanks very much for your help.

 

Mike

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I'll be interested to hear what happens Mike!

 

Best,

Cobie

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Hi All,

 

I want to bring this topic up again, as were are currently looking to expand the coach pool. The schedule has more dates this year, we might have some concurrent events, and there is the normal change in availability. If you had an interest in this, please fill out the application and send it to me!

 

Best,

Cobie

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What makes a good coach? I have an opinion, but before that I'd be interested in anyone else that has had coaching that thought was good. I'd like to know what about the coaching made it good for him/her.

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Interesting question. The fastest riders are not always great coaches, in facts my experience is that most of them are not.

I think to be a great coach you have to be a great observer. Some people are just very good at recognizing patterns by watching riders. They usually have very good visual skills. But I think you also have to be a caring person and have good human skills. You must care about others.

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Interesting question. The fastest riders are not always great coaches, in facts my experience is that most of them are not.

I think to be a great coach you have to be a great observer. Some people are just very good at recognizing patterns by watching riders. They usually have very good visual skills. But I think you also have to be a caring person and have good human skills. You must care about others.

 

I agree on these points, another I would add is being a good communicator. For example, I have had someone very knowledgeable try to explain something to me but using very vague terms that didn't adequately convey the meaning, and although he tried to rephrase he kept using the same vague word and I found it frustrating.

 

(Specific example, in this case, the phrase was "you are behind", but it was never clarified to me if that meant body position, throttle timing, vision, steering, etc., even though I asked a lot of questions trying to figure it out. Without specific data, I couldn't FIX the problem, I just knew there was one... very distracting.)

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Interesting question. The fastest riders are not always great coaches, in facts my experience is that most of them are not.

I think to be a great coach you have to be a great observer. Some people are just very good at recognizing patterns by watching riders. They usually have very good visual skills. But I think you also have to be a caring person and have good human skills. You must care about others.

 

I agree on these points, another I would add is being a good communicator. For example, I have had someone very knowledgeable try to explain something to me but using very vague terms that didn't adequately convey the meaning, and although he tried to rephrase he kept using the same vague word and I found it frustrating.

 

(Specific example, in this case, the phrase was "you are behind", but it was never clarified to me if that meant body position, throttle timing, vision, steering, etc., even though I asked a lot of questions trying to figure it out. Without specific data, I couldn't FIX the problem, I just knew there was one... very distracting.)

 

Seems like you coach had good observation skills but needed help on his problem solving skills. If he understood the root or primary problem he would have been able to articulate it and get your attention on it to resolve.

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Ooops...I'd forgotten about this thread!

 

All good points above, observation is critical for sure, ability to communicate also. And Spaghetti hit on something that we look for in a coach. That person has to actually care about the person he is working with. Sometimes a coach can be a little deficient in another area, but if he/she really cares, can sometimes come up to the point of figuring out what is needed to get across to the athlete. And interestingly enough, students/athletes respond very well to that.

 

There had even been some coaches that had not ended up being top coaches, but the students responded well to them, as they really did care. It's not the only component, but it is a component of a good coach. Some show it in different ways, and part of the coach/athlete relationship is for them both to figure this out. I've observed a coach in another sport/activity. He's kinda gruff, very opinionated, uses a bit of humor often, and can be a bit curt at other times. Some do not get along with him. But, in his own way he really does care that people get good at what he's training (he's a world known firearms instructor, trained everyone from Secret Service, SEALS to Swiss Army).

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My take on a good coach:

 

Someone that has a good understanding of the psychology of people and can tune their coaching to their specific needs. Along with that comes a need to be very patient, have the ability to listen to the students questions and specifically answer them in a language they understand (ie visual aids or hand actions for those who are more visual learners, simpler language).

 

From my previous coaching experience in similar fields, I'd say that a lot of what I did involved the psychology of making someone feel comfortable and at ease with their learning experience. Once they relax they can actually practice things they have learned. If they are tense and nervous they won't get much out of what was taught to them and could pose a safety hazard to themselves or those around them.

 

I'd say it's also important to be able to accurately assess any safety hazards or riders that could pose a safety concern and deal with it in a responsible professional manner. I think this is an attribute that coaches in other venues don't necessarily need but is so important in our sport.

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Good observations.

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Considering sending out an e-mail on this, but starting with the forum first.

 

Our schedule has expanded this year and also we have the possibility of running simultaneous events (some military training could happen).

 

I do need to continue to expand the coach ranks, so if you haven't yet, and are considering it just contact me directly: cobie@superbikeschool.com

 

Best,

Cobie

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OH I loved teaching military. Taught motorcycle safety on an army base for one season. They just do exactly what you say, and listen well :P Hopefully that pans out! I have a contact that is in charge of motorcycle training and he told me they have a budget now to do some different things as many riders have already taken all the courses they offer. I can send you his contact if interested.

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Hi Aliki,

 

Please do forward the contact info, just in case.

 

Some of the Marines...wow. I remember one guy that rode a Triumph 675. He could take that bike to the limit of braking, right from the very first--truly exceptional. He would go from all the speeds we trained this exercise (up to 60 mph) and instantly go right to the point of lifting the rear wheel--maximum braking. Impressive.

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Hi Aliki,

 

Please do forward the contact info, just in case.

 

Some of the Marines...wow. I remember one guy that rode a Triumph 675. He could take that bike to the limit of braking, right from the very first--truly exceptional. He would go from all the speeds we trained this exercise (up to 60 mph) and instantly go right to the point of lifting the rear wheel--maximum braking. Impressive.

Roger!

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