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asinn0007

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About asinn0007

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    Cornering Artist
  • Birthday 07/11/1957

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  • Have you attended a California Superbike School school?
    Yes. May 2009 Thunderbolt, NJ

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    asinn0007
  1. Looks like tires to me. The tires were ridden hard. You were probably at the maximum slippage (about 15%) on the sides, which warmed up the shoulders, but the middle, with less stress, didn't get a chance to warm up. Then the sudden hard braking caused the low side.
  2. But he would be on MotoGP racing slicks, which have notoriously hard carcasses and can be hard for slower riders to get up to temperature. My guess is that the Qualifiers are not in that class, and certainly not the SportAttacks--which are more street oriented.
  3. Bike does lean less. Maybe not "less traction," possibly "steering with the rear tire". When this happening, I am pushing on the inside bar and feel as though I am pushing the rear wheel outwards with butt and inside leg. I did level 1 in NJ. Tires on bikes came in shredded, but after our group rode them, the tires were polished clean. If you have any traction issues, and you have weight on the inside bar, that can be a real factor. Remember the rider input briefing? CF I remember the moral of the story, which is relax and let the bike do its job. But I don't remembe
  4. Bike does lean less. Maybe not "less traction," possibly "steering with the rear tire". When this happening, I am pushing on the inside bar and feel as though I am pushing the rear wheel outwards with butt and inside leg. I did level 1 in NJ. Tires on bikes came in shredded, but after our group rode them, the tires were polished clean.
  5. I try to stay in line with the centerline of the bike, although my best turns are done when I drop the inside shoulder a bit. As if I were to open a door with that shoulder.
  6. Thank you, Cobie. That makes sense, flexing from weight and cornering forces would warm the bottom and sides of the tires. Acceleration forces would warm the rear tires more than braking. Burnouts, anyone?
  7. More Europeans tend to ride year round than Americans, so coming up to temperature quickly is a feature that is closely watched by Europeans. Especially on the street, where stoplights and traffic can give tires multiple opportunities to cool off and warm up. Conti links to this tire report: http://www.conti-moto.sk/PS%20TESTSIEGER%2...K%20ENGLISH.pdf and based on this I bought SportAttacks for the street. However, the American Sport Bike magazines seem pretty unanimous that for track days the Dunlop Qualifier and now the Qualifier 2's are better choices. I suspect that the SportAttack'
  8. Hi Cobie, I wish I can remember where I read it, but an apparent authoritative source said that braking will warm up the whole front tire. The reasoning, or theory, is that with radial ply tires the most stress is put on the carcass through braking and acceleration (deforming the radial plies), and that the tire is warmed from the inside outwards--not from the contact patch inwards. Personally, I'm still warming my tires through zig-zags, but only because hard braking will probably get me a new job as a hood ornament. Does real track experience disprove the theory?
  9. Dear Forum Members and Instructors: I can understand the need to hang off when we're on the track going 95-100%, but some guys I know hang off all the time, on highways, on the streets, etc. Personally, I have some favorite roads where I find it safe enough to travel at 85% of what I estimate the bike, rider, and road is capable of, and I've tried going around these bends while hanging off, and without hanging off. Without hanging off the bike feels secure and planted (although it feels like my elbow and helmet are about to graze the tarmac), but when hanging off--at the same spee
  10. Wow, it's hard to argue with experienced riders like Harnois and I generally agree. I just want clarify regarding sand and gravel and sportbike tires, because I've found that with upgraded tires, I can ignore the usual dusting of construction sand or a bit of road sand along the edges. This is better than the "sport touring" tires I had before, which would give me a fright on the least amount of sand. With a dusting or a light single layer of sand, it seems to me that the softer rubber wraps around the individual sand particles and holds them still, instead of rolling or sliding o
  11. There are videos on youtube if you need to review. Search on California Superbike School.
  12. Gentlemen, Thank you. That is exactly what I'm looking for. The owner of that sight preaches his gospel and the members are generally choir members, so it is very difficult to get an unbiased discussion. Thanks. Andy S.
  13. The three keys are, IMHO. 1. Judging entry speed--staying smooth 2. Finding the right turn-in point 3. Rolling on the throttle as soon as possible. If you misjudge the entry speed, nothing else you can do afterwards could make up for it. This requires visual skills. If the entry speed is too high, you'll charge in, unable to stay smooth, underperforming in one turn or an entire chicane. The turn: Turning point, apex, and quick turn-in are all necessary to proper turning on the street and on the track. Getting on the throttle and rolling on appropriately permits maximum exi
  14. 1. Judging entry speed 2. Staying smooth 3. Rolling on the throttle as soon as possible.
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