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How To Learn To Learn


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I suppose that this isn't really a school question, but I expect an instructor to be best qualified to answer this. I would say that this question is more about the ways in which humans learn new things, and the structure of CSS is the best example.

 

Suppose you take a rider, the worst rider in the world...say 10 years street experience with alot of bad habits. He was self taught in the 1800's and then decided to get that brand new Liter Bike to teach himself AGAIN to ride and has been practicing those bad habits and ingraining them.

 

Mr. Rider comes to CSS, and the only thing going for him is time, money and a burning desire to improve.

 

Given this scenario, he plans to completely retrofit his riding with 13 school sessions. He would like to take levels 1-3 thrice and then do level 4, afterwhich he plans to take another self-inventory.

 

Should Mr. Rider do Level 1 thrice then progress to each level, repeating the same or go through 1-3 sequentially thrice? Level 4 will be the capstone of his regimen.

 

 

My question is an exaggeration, but I suppose I wanted to know which learning strategy would be better.

 

Thanks.

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I suppose that this isn't really a school question, but I expect an instructor to be best qualified to answer this. I would say that this question is more about the ways in which humans learn new things, and the structure of CSS is the best example.

 

Suppose you take a rider, the worst rider in the world...say 10 years street experience with alot of bad habits. He was self taught in the 1800's and then decided to get that brand new Liter Bike to teach himself AGAIN to ride and has been practicing those bad habits and ingraining them.

 

Mr. Rider comes to CSS, and the only thing going for him is time, money and a burning desire to improve.

 

Given this scenario, he plans to completely retrofit his riding with 13 school sessions. He would like to take levels 1-3 thrice and then do level 4, afterwhich he plans to take another self-inventory.

 

Should Mr. Rider do Level 1 thrice then progress to each level, repeating the same or go through 1-3 sequentially thrice? Level 4 will be the capstone of his regimen.

 

 

My question is an exaggeration, but I suppose I wanted to know which learning strategy would be better.

 

Thanks.

 

 

Would it not be best to do level 1-3 once then level 4 ten times?

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I suppose that this isn't really a school question, but I expect an instructor to be best qualified to answer this. I would say that this question is more about the ways in which humans learn new things, and the structure of CSS is the best example.

 

Suppose you take a rider, the worst rider in the world...say 10 years street experience with alot of bad habits. He was self taught in the 1800's and then decided to get that brand new Liter Bike to teach himself AGAIN to ride and has been practicing those bad habits and ingraining them.

 

Mr. Rider comes to CSS, and the only thing going for him is time, money and a burning desire to improve.

 

Given this scenario, he plans to completely retrofit his riding with 13 school sessions. He would like to take levels 1-3 thrice and then do level 4, afterwhich he plans to take another self-inventory.

 

Should Mr. Rider do Level 1 thrice then progress to each level, repeating the same or go through 1-3 sequentially thrice? Level 4 will be the capstone of his regimen.

 

 

My question is an exaggeration, but I suppose I wanted to know which learning strategy would be better.

 

Thanks.

 

 

Would it not be best to do level 1-3 once then level 4 ten times?

Perhaps, but then it defeats the purpose of my question, which is about repetition of lessons and the order in which the repetition is done.

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I suppose that this isn't really a school question, but I expect an instructor to be best qualified to answer this. I would say that this question is more about the ways in which humans learn new things, and the structure of CSS is the best example.

 

Suppose you take a rider, the worst rider in the world...say 10 years street experience with alot of bad habits. He was self taught in the 1800's and then decided to get that brand new Liter Bike to teach himself AGAIN to ride and has been practicing those bad habits and ingraining them.

 

Mr. Rider comes to CSS, and the only thing going for him is time, money and a burning desire to improve.

 

Given this scenario, he plans to completely retrofit his riding with 13 school sessions. He would like to take levels 1-3 thrice and then do level 4, afterwhich he plans to take another self-inventory.

 

Should Mr. Rider do Level 1 thrice then progress to each level, repeating the same or go through 1-3 sequentially thrice? Level 4 will be the capstone of his regimen.

 

 

My question is an exaggeration, but I suppose I wanted to know which learning strategy would be better.

 

Thanks.

 

There is a lot of information in each level, that is for sure. This can be tailored to a particular person, and how he/she is doing. I've had people by choice do a level, and then come back and to it again. I've had riders do level 1-2, and come back and do them again. I've had a returning level 4 student, start at level 1. We've had level 4 students, go back and audit a previous class.

 

Typically though, students progress through the levels, and then at level 4 we have the opportunity to really devote as much time as needed on any given skill. The rider is pretty educated, and we can get in there with more of a fine-tooth comb to see what he/she really neads to improve on. Level 4 is only run by our more senior coaches, as the level 4 consultant. Level 4 is updated for each student, each time and really each time on track.

 

Back to Jaybird's question, and how do people learn: there are exact barriers people run into learning a subject, any subject. It was key to Keith starting the school, when he learned what these barriers were (he took a course), and now all the coaches are trained in finding these barriers. I personally got tutoring as a teenager, and it turned me around from a not very good student, to doing well in school.

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So a person's process depends on their learning style and their particular barriers??? Or is the learning style itself the barrier?

What can I do to learn more about my own learning and style and/or barriers? This has obvious implications for any aspect in life and not just learning to ride a motorcycle well...but it can certainly be applied there.

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