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Pivot Steering


acebobby
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When I did the school earlier this week I learned loads of techniques, but this one in particular has been playing on my mind. The thing is I understand the exact principle Andy Ibbott was showing us in the class room when pushing the wall with one hand and putting some tension in the opposite leg, demonstrating how much more power the push has when you do this! The problem I am having is separating this technique from locking in to the tank! When I lock into the tank I tend to push of the peg and drive my knee into the stomp grip, basically getting my leg wedged between the peg and the tank, by doing this I believe that creates alot of tension through my leg just as I turn in.

Is it correct to assume that both these techniques go hand in hand or am I missing something?

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I don't know if I'm answering your question right, but I thought Pivot Steering was putting most of your pressure on the outside peg. Pushing into the tank puts even more weight on your outside peg. The way I explained it to my wife is as Pivot Point Steering, so she can remember what it means. It's a Pivot Point that one focuses turning the motorcycle with. I haven't been through the school, but as it has been described to me, that's the method I use.

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When I did the school earlier this week I learned loads of techniques, but this one in particular has been playing on my mind. The thing is I understand the exact principle Andy Ibbott was showing us in the class room when pushing the wall with one hand and putting some tension in the opposite leg, demonstrating how much more power the push has when you do this! The problem I am having is separating this technique from locking in to the tank! When I lock into the tank I tend to push of the peg and drive my knee into the stomp grip, basically getting my leg wedged between the peg and the tank, by doing this I believe that creates alot of tension through my leg just as I turn in.

Is it correct to assume that both these techniques go hand in hand or am I missing something?

 

Ace--why would they be seperate and/or exclusive?

 

CF

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When I did the school earlier this week I learned loads of techniques, but this one in particular has been playing on my mind. The thing is I understand the exact principle Andy Ibbott was showing us in the class room when pushing the wall with one hand and putting some tension in the opposite leg, demonstrating how much more power the push has when you do this! The problem I am having is separating this technique from locking in to the tank! When I lock into the tank I tend to push of the peg and drive my knee into the stomp grip, basically getting my leg wedged between the peg and the tank, by doing this I believe that creates alot of tension through my leg just as I turn in.

Is it correct to assume that both these techniques go hand in hand or am I missing something?

 

Ace--why would they be seperate and/or exclusive?

 

CF

 

 

Hi Cobie

Ok some time ago Keith responded to a question stating that you only had to tighten up on the outside leg for the duration of the time it takes to steer the bike then you can relax again, makes perfect sense! I however am unable to relax my leg once at lean angle as my leg is like a coiled spring wedged between my footpeg and tank, I am worried that if I relaxed the tension in my leg I would lose my lock onto the bike and unpset the stability mid turn. does this make sense?

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When I did the school earlier this week I learned loads of techniques, but this one in particular has been playing on my mind. The thing is I understand the exact principle Andy Ibbott was showing us in the class room when pushing the wall with one hand and putting some tension in the opposite leg, demonstrating how much more power the push has when you do this! The problem I am having is separating this technique from locking in to the tank! When I lock into the tank I tend to push of the peg and drive my knee into the stomp grip, basically getting my leg wedged between the peg and the tank, by doing this I believe that creates alot of tension through my leg just as I turn in.

Is it correct to assume that both these techniques go hand in hand or am I missing something?

 

Ace--why would they be seperate and/or exclusive?

 

CF

 

 

Hi Cobie

Ok some time ago Keith responded to a question stating that you only had to tighten up on the outside leg for the duration of the time it takes to steer the bike then you can relax again, makes perfect sense! I however am unable to relax my leg once at lean angle as my leg is like a coiled spring wedged between my footpeg and tank, I am worried that if I relaxed the tension in my leg I would lose my lock onto the bike and unpset the stability mid turn. does this make sense?

 

Got it. One would have to use some effort to stay locked on, that's for sure. Would it be a little more (or a fair amount more) during the action of steering, especially trying to steer quickly, going fast?

 

CF

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When I did the school earlier this week I learned loads of techniques, but this one in particular has been playing on my mind. The thing is I understand the exact principle Andy Ibbott was showing us in the class room when pushing the wall with one hand and putting some tension in the opposite leg, demonstrating how much more power the push has when you do this! The problem I am having is separating this technique from locking in to the tank! When I lock into the tank I tend to push of the peg and drive my knee into the stomp grip, basically getting my leg wedged between the peg and the tank, by doing this I believe that creates alot of tension through my leg just as I turn in.

Is it correct to assume that both these techniques go hand in hand or am I missing something?

 

Ace--why would they be seperate and/or exclusive?

 

CF

 

 

Hi Cobie

Ok some time ago Keith responded to a question stating that you only had to tighten up on the outside leg for the duration of the time it takes to steer the bike then you can relax again, makes perfect sense! I however am unable to relax my leg once at lean angle as my leg is like a coiled spring wedged between my footpeg and tank, I am worried that if I relaxed the tension in my leg I would lose my lock onto the bike and unpset the stability mid turn. does this make sense?

 

Got it. One would have to use some effort to stay locked on, that's for sure. Would it be a little more (or a fair amount more) during the action of steering, especially trying to steer quickly, going fast?

 

CF

 

I would say that the pressure remains the same from turn in throughout the turn, I do feel securely locked onto my bike though which is a great feeling, should I be applying even more pressure when I steer or should I maybe experiment with less energetic ways of locking on to the bike?

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When I did the school earlier this week I learned loads of techniques, but this one in particular has been playing on my mind. The thing is I understand the exact principle Andy Ibbott was showing us in the class room when pushing the wall with one hand and putting some tension in the opposite leg, demonstrating how much more power the push has when you do this! The problem I am having is separating this technique from locking in to the tank! When I lock into the tank I tend to push of the peg and drive my knee into the stomp grip, basically getting my leg wedged between the peg and the tank, by doing this I believe that creates alot of tension through my leg just as I turn in.

Is it correct to assume that both these techniques go hand in hand or am I missing something?

 

Ace--why would they be seperate and/or exclusive?

 

CF

 

 

Hi Cobie

Ok some time ago Keith responded to a question stating that you only had to tighten up on the outside leg for the duration of the time it takes to steer the bike then you can relax again, makes perfect sense! I however am unable to relax my leg once at lean angle as my leg is like a coiled spring wedged between my footpeg and tank, I am worried that if I relaxed the tension in my leg I would lose my lock onto the bike and unpset the stability mid turn. does this make sense?

 

Got it. One would have to use some effort to stay locked on, that's for sure. Would it be a little more (or a fair amount more) during the action of steering, especially trying to steer quickly, going fast?

 

CF

 

I would say that the pressure remains the same from turn in throughout the turn, I do feel securely locked onto my bike though which is a great feeling, should I be applying even more pressure when I steer or should I maybe experiment with less energetic ways of locking on to the bike?

 

 

Look at it this way--in that technique, when you are steering (and lets say you were going fast, and had to steer it sharply) doesn't it take a lot of effort to steer the bike quickly? Hint: we have known racers that have BENT handlebars from steering the bike aggresively.

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When I did the school earlier this week I learned loads of techniques, but this one in particular has been playing on my mind. The thing is I understand the exact principle Andy Ibbott was showing us in the class room when pushing the wall with one hand and putting some tension in the opposite leg, demonstrating how much more power the push has when you do this! The problem I am having is separating this technique from locking in to the tank! When I lock into the tank I tend to push of the peg and drive my knee into the stomp grip, basically getting my leg wedged between the peg and the tank, by doing this I believe that creates alot of tension through my leg just as I turn in.

Is it correct to assume that both these techniques go hand in hand or am I missing something?

 

Ace--why would they be seperate and/or exclusive?

 

CF

 

 

Hi Cobie

Ok some time ago Keith responded to a question stating that you only had to tighten up on the outside leg for the duration of the time it takes to steer the bike then you can relax again, makes perfect sense! I however am unable to relax my leg once at lean angle as my leg is like a coiled spring wedged between my footpeg and tank, I am worried that if I relaxed the tension in my leg I would lose my lock onto the bike and unpset the stability mid turn. does this make sense?

 

Got it. One would have to use some effort to stay locked on, that's for sure. Would it be a little more (or a fair amount more) during the action of steering, especially trying to steer quickly, going fast?

 

CF

 

I would say that the pressure remains the same from turn in throughout the turn, I do feel securely locked onto my bike though which is a great feeling, should I be applying even more pressure when I steer or should I maybe experiment with less energetic ways of locking on to the bike?

 

 

Look at it this way--in that technique, when you are steering (and lets say you were going fast, and had to steer it sharply) doesn't it take a lot of effort to steer the bike quickly? Hint: we have known racers that have BENT handlebars from steering the bike aggresively.

 

Got it Cobie thanks, I can see how planted on the bike one would have to be to apply enough pressure bend or snap a handlebar!

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Got it Cobie thanks, I can see how planted on the bike one would have to be to apply enough pressure bend or snap a handlebar!

 

Right, and is that much force required all the time? Nope, it wastes the legs (we get this a lot too, how to get teh guy sorted on bike so he's not wasting his legs or his arms).

 

CF

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