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More Questions Quick Turning This Time


pbrown
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OK so i've done L1 & L2 and have been trying to practice on track. I was at a new track to me at the weekend so asked an instructor from the trackday company to show me the lines round the place. Well he proceded to show me the lines but then went a step further & pointed out what he considered to be a few weaknesses, one being that I was missing my apex's. Apparently i'm consistent with where my turn in starts & it's in the right place (so I learn't something from L1) and so is my apex point but I miss it. This is down to not turning fast enough. That's fair does & it is something i have been practicing but am not getting quite right.

 

I can see that one exercise (from L1) is to keep trying to hit my apex & if I turn fast enough then I might even manage to be inside my apex. Are there any other exercises that could improve how fast I turn?

 

Am I right in thinking that if I want to practice even faster turning (prior to going into a corner faster) that I could maybe go a bit deeper into the corner before I initiate my turn & still go for the same apex?

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OK so i've done L1 & L2 and have been trying to practice on track. I was at a new track to me at the weekend so asked an instructor from the trackday company to show me the lines round the place. Well he proceded to show me the lines but then went a step further & pointed out what he considered to be a few weaknesses, one being that I was missing my apex's. Apparently i'm consistent with where my turn in starts & it's in the right place (so I learn't something from L1) and so is my apex point but I miss it. This is down to not turning fast enough. That's fair does & it is something i have been practicing but am not getting quite right.

 

I can see that one exercise (from L1) is to keep trying to hit my apex & if I turn fast enough then I might even manage to be inside my apex. Are there any other exercises that could improve how fast I turn?

 

Am I right in thinking that if I want to practice even faster turning (prior to going into a corner faster) that I could maybe go a bit deeper into the corner before I initiate my turn & still go for the same apex?

 

If you are not quite making it to the apex, the turn point could be a factor, but how about the 2-step technique--where exactly are you looking when you look into the turn (and when are you looking).

 

CF

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I learned that the later I look into the corner after finding my turn point, the sloppier I am, and the slower I turn the bike. Without continued training to embed that skill, it's hard to keep in mind. I'm going to come up with a review sheet for the things I learned over the weekend that impacted my riding the most, and review it before a trackday and during the trackday.

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OK so i've done L1 & L2 and have been trying to practice on track. I was at a new track to me at the weekend so asked an instructor from the trackday company to show me the lines round the place. Well he proceded to show me the lines but then went a step further & pointed out what he considered to be a few weaknesses, one being that I was missing my apex's. Apparently i'm consistent with where my turn in starts & it's in the right place (so I learn't something from L1) and so is my apex point but I miss it. This is down to not turning fast enough. That's fair does & it is something i have been practicing but am not getting quite right.

 

I can see that one exercise (from L1) is to keep trying to hit my apex & if I turn fast enough then I might even manage to be inside my apex. Are there any other exercises that could improve how fast I turn?

 

Am I right in thinking that if I want to practice even faster turning (prior to going into a corner faster) that I could maybe go a bit deeper into the corner before I initiate my turn & still go for the same apex?

 

If you are not quite making it to the apex, the turn point could be a factor, but how about the 2-step technique--where exactly are you looking when you look into the turn (and when are you looking).

 

CF

I'm normally looking at what I consider to be my apex which usually turns out to be a point on a bit of red & white painted rumble strip. I am usually looking at my apex point as soon as I feel confident that I am going to hit my turn point. Is this the trick question as I have a vague recolection of being told to look beyond where my apex point is but can't remember whether that is only for corner that go back on themselves.

 

Cobie, Why are you thinking it might be my turn point?

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Anyone else with any constructive comments?

 

So, you look beyond your apex? When you switch your attention from Turn point to Apex, you made reference to only doing this when you're sure you're going to hit it? Why do you do this and would carrying this principal in other aspects of your riding help?

 

Bullet

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Anyone else with any constructive comments?

 

So, you look beyond your apex? When you switch your attention from Turn point to Apex, you made reference to only doing this when you're sure you're going to hit it? Why do you do this and would carrying this principal in other aspects of your riding help?

 

Bullet

I move my attention to my apex before I get to my TP so I can see where

I want to go next & not to fixate on 1 spot, I can still see my turn

point with my perifery vision. I am always looking further into the

corner & move my attention to where I want to exit the corner before I

get to the apex. I do this so I know where I am going next & to keep a

widescreen view on the track ahead. It also gets disconcerting if you

look at the apex while going over it.

 

'So, you look beyond your apex?' these a nigling bit in the back of my

head thats telling me I heard something about looking 1m beyond my apex

but as I said before I can't remember whether I should always be doing

this?

 

Is this the reason I am missing my apex rather than not turning quick

enough?

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Anyone else with any constructive comments?

 

So, you look beyond your apex? When you switch your attention from Turn point to Apex, you made reference to only doing this when you're sure you're going to hit it? Why do you do this and would carrying this principal in other aspects of your riding help?

 

Bullet

I move my attention to my apex before I get to my TP so I can see where

I want to go next & not to fixate on 1 spot, I can still see my turn

point with my perifery vision. I am always looking further into the

corner & move my attention to where I want to exit the corner before I

get to the apex. I do this so I know where I am going next & to keep a

widescreen view on the track ahead. It also gets disconcerting if you

look at the apex while going over it.

 

'So, you look beyond your apex?' these a nigling bit in the back of my

head thats telling me I heard something about looking 1m beyond my apex

but as I said before I can't remember whether I should always be doing

this?

 

Is this the reason I am missing my apex rather than not turning quick

enough?

 

 

So, if you don't look at something for long enough with enough attention, would that enable you to hit it consistently?

 

Bullet

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Anyone else with any constructive comments?

 

So, you look beyond your apex? When you switch your attention from Turn point to Apex, you made reference to only doing this when you're sure you're going to hit it? Why do you do this and would carrying this principal in other aspects of your riding help?

 

Bullet

I move my attention to my apex before I get to my TP so I can see where

I want to go next & not to fixate on 1 spot, I can still see my turn

point with my perifery vision. I am always looking further into the

corner & move my attention to where I want to exit the corner before I

get to the apex. I do this so I know where I am going next & to keep a

widescreen view on the track ahead. It also gets disconcerting if you

look at the apex while going over it.

 

'So, you look beyond your apex?' these a nigling bit in the back of my

head thats telling me I heard something about looking 1m beyond my apex

but as I said before I can't remember whether I should always be doing

this?

 

Is this the reason I am missing my apex rather than not turning quick

enough?

 

 

So, if you don't look at something for long enough with enough attention, would that enable you to hit it consistently?

 

Bullet

No.

I don't feel as though I am skimming over the points quickly, I am looking at them for a reasonable amount of time. Whether it's enough time?

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Anyone else with any constructive comments?

 

So, you look beyond your apex? When you switch your attention from Turn point to Apex, you made reference to only doing this when you're sure you're going to hit it? Why do you do this and would carrying this principal in other aspects of your riding help?

 

Bullet

I move my attention to my apex before I get to my TP so I can see where

I want to go next & not to fixate on 1 spot, I can still see my turn

point with my perifery vision. I am always looking further into the

corner & move my attention to where I want to exit the corner before I

get to the apex. I do this so I know where I am going next & to keep a

widescreen view on the track ahead. It also gets disconcerting if you

look at the apex while going over it.

 

'So, you look beyond your apex?' these a nigling bit in the back of my

head thats telling me I heard something about looking 1m beyond my apex

but as I said before I can't remember whether I should always be doing

this?

 

Is this the reason I am missing my apex rather than not turning quick

enough?

 

 

So, if you don't look at something for long enough with enough attention, would that enable you to hit it consistently?

 

Bullet

No.

I don't feel as though I am skimming over the points quickly, I am looking at them for a reasonable amount of time. Whether it's enough time?

 

 

Well, is the timing of 2 step, any different from the 3 step? You already idenitifed you look at the turn point until your sure you're going to do...? Then you look at... until... what?

 

Does the timing of the when we look at something affect our ability to hit the points we look at..?

 

Bullet

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Anyone else with any constructive comments?

 

So, you look beyond your apex? When you switch your attention from Turn point to Apex, you made reference to only doing this when you're sure you're going to hit it? Why do you do this and would carrying this principal in other aspects of your riding help?

 

Bullet

I move my attention to my apex before I get to my TP so I can see where

I want to go next & not to fixate on 1 spot, I can still see my turn

point with my perifery vision. I am always looking further into the

corner & move my attention to where I want to exit the corner before I

get to the apex. I do this so I know where I am going next & to keep a

widescreen view on the track ahead. It also gets disconcerting if you

look at the apex while going over it.

 

'So, you look beyond your apex?' these a nigling bit in the back of my

head thats telling me I heard something about looking 1m beyond my apex

but as I said before I can't remember whether I should always be doing

this?

 

Is this the reason I am missing my apex rather than not turning quick

enough?

 

 

So, if you don't look at something for long enough with enough attention, would that enable you to hit it consistently?

 

Bullet

No.

I don't feel as though I am skimming over the points quickly, I am looking at them for a reasonable amount of time. Whether it's enough time?

 

 

Well, is the timing of 2 step, any different from the 3 step? You already idenitifed you look at the turn point until your sure you're going to do...? Then you look at... until... what?

 

Does the timing of the when we look at something affect our ability to hit the points we look at..?

 

Bullet

No I don't see why the timing would be any different between 2 step & 3 step.

I am looking at the apex as early as I can without causing myself to turn the bike too early & miss my TP. I'm slightly more vague on when I move my attention from the apex except that it's sometime before i've got there. I used to spend too much time looking at the apex but I'm really trying to look for my exit point now. On most corners it feels like a reasonable flow of information. The only corner where I found it wasn't the case was gerrards & I would feel completly lost part way round. I've only done the place once but it didn't get any better thru' the day.

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Anyone else with any constructive comments?

 

So, you look beyond your apex? When you switch your attention from Turn point to Apex, you made reference to only doing this when you're sure you're going to hit it? Why do you do this and would carrying this principal in other aspects of your riding help?

 

Bullet

I move my attention to my apex before I get to my TP so I can see where

I want to go next & not to fixate on 1 spot, I can still see my turn

point with my perifery vision. I am always looking further into the

corner & move my attention to where I want to exit the corner before I

get to the apex. I do this so I know where I am going next & to keep a

widescreen view on the track ahead. It also gets disconcerting if you

look at the apex while going over it.

 

'So, you look beyond your apex?' these a nigling bit in the back of my

head thats telling me I heard something about looking 1m beyond my apex

but as I said before I can't remember whether I should always be doing

this?

 

Is this the reason I am missing my apex rather than not turning quick

enough?

 

 

So, if you don't look at something for long enough with enough attention, would that enable you to hit it consistently?

 

Bullet

No.

I don't feel as though I am skimming over the points quickly, I am looking at them for a reasonable amount of time. Whether it's enough time?

 

 

Well, is the timing of 2 step, any different from the 3 step? You already idenitifed you look at the turn point until your sure you're going to do...? Then you look at... until... what?

 

Does the timing of the when we look at something affect our ability to hit the points we look at..?

 

Bullet

No I don't see why the timing would be any different between 2 step & 3 step.

I am looking at the apex as early as I can without causing myself to turn the bike too early & miss my TP. I'm slightly more vague on when I move my attention from the apex except that it's sometime before i've got there. I used to spend too much time looking at the apex but I'm really trying to look for my exit point now. On most corners it feels like a reasonable flow of information. The only corner where I found it wasn't the case was gerrards & I would feel completly lost part way round. I've only done the place once but it didn't get any better thru' the day.

 

Good, we're getting some progress.

 

OK gerrard's at Mallory is a tricky turn, because can you see the Apex of the turn when you at your turn point? If you can't look to the Apex, what could you look for instead to get you to your Apex.

 

Bullet

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Anyone else with any constructive comments?

 

So, you look beyond your apex? When you switch your attention from Turn point to Apex, you made reference to only doing this when you're sure you're going to hit it? Why do you do this and would carrying this principal in other aspects of your riding help?

 

Bullet

I move my attention to my apex before I get to my TP so I can see where

I want to go next & not to fixate on 1 spot, I can still see my turn

point with my perifery vision. I am always looking further into the

corner & move my attention to where I want to exit the corner before I

get to the apex. I do this so I know where I am going next & to keep a

widescreen view on the track ahead. It also gets disconcerting if you

look at the apex while going over it.

 

'So, you look beyond your apex?' these a nigling bit in the back of my

head thats telling me I heard something about looking 1m beyond my apex

but as I said before I can't remember whether I should always be doing

this?

 

Is this the reason I am missing my apex rather than not turning quick

enough?

 

 

So, if you don't look at something for long enough with enough attention, would that enable you to hit it consistently?

 

Bullet

No.

I don't feel as though I am skimming over the points quickly, I am looking at them for a reasonable amount of time. Whether it's enough time?

 

 

Well, is the timing of 2 step, any different from the 3 step? You already idenitifed you look at the turn point until your sure you're going to do...? Then you look at... until... what?

 

Does the timing of the when we look at something affect our ability to hit the points we look at..?

 

Bullet

No I don't see why the timing would be any different between 2 step & 3 step.

I am looking at the apex as early as I can without causing myself to turn the bike too early & miss my TP. I'm slightly more vague on when I move my attention from the apex except that it's sometime before i've got there. I used to spend too much time looking at the apex but I'm really trying to look for my exit point now. On most corners it feels like a reasonable flow of information. The only corner where I found it wasn't the case was gerrards & I would feel completly lost part way round. I've only done the place once but it didn't get any better thru' the day.

 

Good, we're getting some progress.

 

OK gerrard's at Mallory is a tricky turn, because can you see the Apex of the turn when you at your turn point? If you can't look to the Apex, what could you look for instead to get you to your Apex.

 

Bullet

No the apex is on the other side of the track towards the exit of the turn.

I think I kept looking as far ahead as I could towards the inside of the turn but it didn't feel good. I could create some more RP's. There was a patch in the tarmac part way round that I looked for & tried to stay to the inside of.

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Anyone else with any constructive comments?

 

So, you look beyond your apex? When you switch your attention from Turn point to Apex, you made reference to only doing this when you're sure you're going to hit it? Why do you do this and would carrying this principal in other aspects of your riding help?

 

Bullet

I move my attention to my apex before I get to my TP so I can see where

I want to go next & not to fixate on 1 spot, I can still see my turn

point with my perifery vision. I am always looking further into the

corner & move my attention to where I want to exit the corner before I

get to the apex. I do this so I know where I am going next & to keep a

widescreen view on the track ahead. It also gets disconcerting if you

look at the apex while going over it.

 

'So, you look beyond your apex?' these a nigling bit in the back of my

head thats telling me I heard something about looking 1m beyond my apex

but as I said before I can't remember whether I should always be doing

this?

 

Is this the reason I am missing my apex rather than not turning quick

enough?

 

 

So, if you don't look at something for long enough with enough attention, would that enable you to hit it consistently?

 

Bullet

No.

I don't feel as though I am skimming over the points quickly, I am looking at them for a reasonable amount of time. Whether it's enough time?

 

 

Well, is the timing of 2 step, any different from the 3 step? You already idenitifed you look at the turn point until your sure you're going to do...? Then you look at... until... what?

 

Does the timing of the when we look at something affect our ability to hit the points we look at..?

 

Bullet

No I don't see why the timing would be any different between 2 step & 3 step.

I am looking at the apex as early as I can without causing myself to turn the bike too early & miss my TP. I'm slightly more vague on when I move my attention from the apex except that it's sometime before i've got there. I used to spend too much time looking at the apex but I'm really trying to look for my exit point now. On most corners it feels like a reasonable flow of information. The only corner where I found it wasn't the case was gerrards & I would feel completly lost part way round. I've only done the place once but it didn't get any better thru' the day.

 

Good, we're getting some progress.

 

OK gerrard's at Mallory is a tricky turn, because can you see the Apex of the turn when you at your turn point? If you can't look to the Apex, what could you look for instead to get you to your Apex.

 

Bullet

No the apex is on the other side of the track towards the exit of the turn.

I think I kept looking as far ahead as I could towards the inside of the turn but it didn't feel good. I could create some more RP's. There was a patch in the tarmac part way round that I looked for & tried to stay to the inside of.

 

That's right, its all the way round that long turn...

 

Yeah, finding some RP's (or more importantly some really easy to use RP's) would help for sure, and you're thinking along the right lines, there are some bands of tarmac and you can use those or sure. The term we use for the inside of the track (as you described it) is the vanishing point, and thats a second best to an RP.

 

So, are we in agreement that perhaps in this turn, your RP's aren't good enough to enable you to locate yourself time after time? How could you fix this the next time you're there?

 

Bullet

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Anyone else with any constructive comments?

 

So, you look beyond your apex? When you switch your attention from Turn point to Apex, you made reference to only doing this when you're sure you're going to hit it? Why do you do this and would carrying this principal in other aspects of your riding help?

 

Bullet

I move my attention to my apex before I get to my TP so I can see where

I want to go next & not to fixate on 1 spot, I can still see my turn

point with my perifery vision. I am always looking further into the

corner & move my attention to where I want to exit the corner before I

get to the apex. I do this so I know where I am going next & to keep a

widescreen view on the track ahead. It also gets disconcerting if you

look at the apex while going over it.

 

'So, you look beyond your apex?' these a nigling bit in the back of my

head thats telling me I heard something about looking 1m beyond my apex

but as I said before I can't remember whether I should always be doing

this?

 

Is this the reason I am missing my apex rather than not turning quick

enough?

 

 

So, if you don't look at something for long enough with enough attention, would that enable you to hit it consistently?

 

Bullet

No.

I don't feel as though I am skimming over the points quickly, I am looking at them for a reasonable amount of time. Whether it's enough time?

 

 

Well, is the timing of 2 step, any different from the 3 step? You already idenitifed you look at the turn point until your sure you're going to do...? Then you look at... until... what?

 

Does the timing of the when we look at something affect our ability to hit the points we look at..?

 

Bullet

No I don't see why the timing would be any different between 2 step & 3 step.

I am looking at the apex as early as I can without causing myself to turn the bike too early & miss my TP. I'm slightly more vague on when I move my attention from the apex except that it's sometime before i've got there. I used to spend too much time looking at the apex but I'm really trying to look for my exit point now. On most corners it feels like a reasonable flow of information. The only corner where I found it wasn't the case was gerrards & I would feel completly lost part way round. I've only done the place once but it didn't get any better thru' the day.

 

Good, we're getting some progress.

 

OK gerrard's at Mallory is a tricky turn, because can you see the Apex of the turn when you at your turn point? If you can't look to the Apex, what could you look for instead to get you to your Apex.

 

Bullet

No the apex is on the other side of the track towards the exit of the turn.

I think I kept looking as far ahead as I could towards the inside of the turn but it didn't feel good. I could create some more RP's. There was a patch in the tarmac part way round that I looked for & tried to stay to the inside of.

 

That's right, its all the way round that long turn...

 

Yeah, finding some RP's (or more importantly some really easy to use RP's) would help for sure, and you're thinking along the right lines, there are some bands of tarmac and you can use those or sure. The term we use for the inside of the track (as you described it) is the vanishing point, and thats a second best to an RP.

 

So, are we in agreement that perhaps in this turn, your RP's aren't good enough to enable you to locate yourself time after time? How could you fix this the next time you're there?

 

Bullet

I've used the vanishing point when out on the road to adjust speed & determine severity of the corner.

This was certainly the first time i'd come across a long corner where I couldn't just use 3 points & I certainly didn't have enough to get me round comfortably. I need to find more points for my line to progress around the corner until I can see the apex & cut back in. I guess these RP's could even be off the track as long as they were pointing me in the right direction.

 

Or better still don't go back there.

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Yes, RP's are individual to some degree, it's what works for you, they're preferable on the track, but off track ones work too. Find some that create that map for you.

 

So, having ridden there for a day and not found them easily at the speeds you've been going, what might you need to change to find some more easily?

 

If we go back now and look where you started from, do you think now that your inability to get to your Apex is actually related to quick turning, or an in ability to really locate yourself, know what too look at etc?

 

Bullet

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I just use RP's as a filler between turn point and apex. I have some around my turn points to help locate it, but mostly the ones around my apex (to show where I'm at) and my exit during acceleration, are the ones I'm concerned about. Would they help in quick turning also, or would he just need to take it down a notch to get comfortable in that section?

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Yes, RP's are individual to some degree, it's what works for you, they're preferable on the track, but off track ones work too. Find some that create that map for you.

 

So, having ridden there for a day and not found them easily at the speeds you've been going, what might you need to change to find some more easily?

 

If we go back now and look where you started from, do you think now that your inability to get to your Apex is actually related to quick turning, or an in ability to really locate yourself, know what too look at etc?

 

Bullet

If I slow down a little I'll give myself more time to look for RP's.

I'm back at Oulton next weekend so I'll slow down a little & check my RP's & define them better. I do find that I get carried away some times & need to back off. I've done some of my best rides in the damp when all I think of is being smooth & doing my 3 points.

 

One thing I have noticed is that when you late turn into a corner there is often someone coming up the inside & blocking your route round the corner, i'm not sure whether they think i've overshot the corner or not. I'm guessing i need to use less track & stay in board a bit

 

Thanks Bullet

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Yes, RP's are individual to some degree, it's what works for you, they're preferable on the track, but off track ones work too. Find some that create that map for you.

 

So, having ridden there for a day and not found them easily at the speeds you've been going, what might you need to change to find some more easily?

 

If we go back now and look where you started from, do you think now that your inability to get to your Apex is actually related to quick turning, or an in ability to really locate yourself, know what too look at etc?

 

Bullet

If I slow down a little I'll give myself more time to look for RP's.

I'm back at Oulton next weekend so I'll slow down a little & check my RP's & define them better. I do find that I get carried away some times & need to back off. I've done some of my best rides in the damp when all I think of is being smooth & doing my 3 points.

 

One thing I have noticed is that when you late turn into a corner there is often someone coming up the inside & blocking your route round the corner, i'm not sure whether they think i've overshot the corner or not. I'm guessing i need to use less track & stay in board a bit

 

Thanks Bullet

 

 

You worked it out yourself, I only ask questions.. :-) You're welcome anyway mate, no worries.

 

You'll soon discover that the key to start going quickly, and by that, I mean really quick, all comes from visuals. If you overlook it and dismiss it, you'll ultimately get frustrated as you top out in your available space.. Whilst sometimes it might seem a waste of a session or two to build up your visual RP's, you'll find it pay dividends when you start to go quicker, as you'll know where you're going, not just looking into an empty space of tarmac!

 

Keep practitsing, let us know how it goes after your next track session.

 

Bullet

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Yes, RP's are individual to some degree, it's what works for you, they're preferable on the track, but off track ones work too. Find some that create that map for you.

 

So, having ridden there for a day and not found them easily at the speeds you've been going, what might you need to change to find some more easily?

 

If we go back now and look where you started from, do you think now that your inability to get to your Apex is actually related to quick turning, or an in ability to really locate yourself, know what too look at etc?

 

Bullet

If I slow down a little I'll give myself more time to look for RP's.

I'm back at Oulton next weekend so I'll slow down a little & check my RP's & define them better. I do find that I get carried away some times & need to back off. I've done some of my best rides in the damp when all I think of is being smooth & doing my 3 points.

 

One thing I have noticed is that when you late turn into a corner there is often someone coming up the inside & blocking your route round the corner, i'm not sure whether they think i've overshot the corner or not. I'm guessing i need to use less track & stay in board a bit

 

Thanks Bullet

 

 

You worked it out yourself, I only ask questions.. :-) You're welcome anyway mate, no worries.

 

You'll soon discover that the key to start going quickly, and by that, I mean really quick, all comes from visuals. If you overlook it and dismiss it, you'll ultimately get frustrated as you top out in your available space.. Whilst sometimes it might seem a waste of a session or two to build up your visual RP's, you'll find it pay dividends when you start to go quicker, as you'll know where you're going, not just looking into an empty space of tarmac!

 

Keep practitsing, let us know how it goes after your next track session.

 

Bullet

I felt I got a lot out of L2 where my mate didn't like it but I obviously need to practice a lot more & open my eyes more.

 

Cheers

Paul

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I felt I got a lot out of L2 where my mate didn't like it but I obviously need to practice a lot more & open my eyes more.

 

Cheers

Paul

 

Hi paul,

 

Can you call me at the office, really like to find out what happened with your mate: 800-530-3350, call any time.

 

Best,

Cobie

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Yes, RP's are individual to some degree, it's what works for you, they're preferable on the track, but off track ones work too. Find some that create that map for you.

 

So, having ridden there for a day and not found them easily at the speeds you've been going, what might you need to change to find some more easily?

 

If we go back now and look where you started from, do you think now that your inability to get to your Apex is actually related to quick turning, or an in ability to really locate yourself, know what too look at etc?

 

Bullet

If I slow down a little I'll give myself more time to look for RP's.

I'm back at Oulton next weekend so I'll slow down a little & check my RP's & define them better. I do find that I get carried away some times & need to back off. I've done some of my best rides in the damp when all I think of is being smooth & doing my 3 points.

 

One thing I have noticed is that when you late turn into a corner there is often someone coming up the inside & blocking your route round the corner, i'm not sure whether they think i've overshot the corner or not. I'm guessing i need to use less track & stay in board a bit

 

Thanks Bullet

 

 

You worked it out yourself, I only ask questions.. :-) You're welcome anyway mate, no worries.

 

You'll soon discover that the key to start going quickly, and by that, I mean really quick, all comes from visuals. If you overlook it and dismiss it, you'll ultimately get frustrated as you top out in your available space.. Whilst sometimes it might seem a waste of a session or two to build up your visual RP's, you'll find it pay dividends when you start to go quicker, as you'll know where you're going, not just looking into an empty space of tarmac!

 

Keep practitsing, let us know how it goes after your next track session.

 

Bullet

OK so I did Oulton on Saturday with some mixed results. It was raining so it was a good day to go slower & look for RP's & do some practicing. I did a few sessions deciding on my RP's & consiously trying to do 2 step & 3 step. What I found I was doing was fixating on my apex's.

I was getting a little bogged down with this so for the last sessions I just went out & rode keeping wide vision & not consiously looking at any of my RP's & it felt a whole lot smoother.

Am I only going to get short term gains from this kinda riding, is it acceptable to process RP's on a subconcious level once youve fixed where they are?

This got me to thinking about some of my problem corners around the track, I am really happy with the faster corners but struggle on the slow chicane type corners & I am beginning to think that it's because I have been fixating on the kerbs rather than seeing the whole scene.

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OK so I did Oulton on Saturday with some mixed results. It was raining so it was a good day to go slower & look for RP's & do some practicing. I did a few sessions deciding on my RP's & consiously trying to do 2 step & 3 step. What I found I was doing was fixating on my apex's.

I was getting a little bogged down with this so for the last sessions I just went out & rode keeping wide vision & not consiously looking at any of my RP's & it felt a whole lot smoother.

Am I only going to get short term gains from this kinda riding, is it acceptable to process RP's on a subconcious level once youve fixed where they are?

This got me to thinking about some of my problem corners around the track, I am really happy with the faster corners but struggle on the slow chicane type corners & I am beginning to think that it's because I have been fixating on the kerbs rather than seeing the whole scene.

 

So would you say, you saw your Apex coming, then as you got to it you realised you were looking down at the floor as it came towards you, or was it something else? Which corners at Outlon were you struggling with specifically mate, as it's my local track, and I have some good knowledge of the place personally.

 

What benefits did you feel you got from being in wide vision, as opposed to solely focused on RP's?

 

Bullet

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