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New Bike - School Questions


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Hello,

 

This past weekend I purchased my first new motorcycle ever.

I purchased a 2009 Buell XB12R

 

I've been riding bikes on the street for 30 years but they have all been antiques.

My business is manufacturing parts for Vintage Indian Motorcycles ( www.starklite.com )

 

With the incentives offered on the Buell's, and I could tell my father it's not a Harley, and the fact that I've always wanted something with a bit more HP than my 1947 Chief I made the decision to purchase the bike.

 

I purchased it on Sat 2/13, picked it up on 2/14. Rode the bike from Skip Fordyce HD in Riverside down to hwy 74 and out to the coast highway. Rode a total of 160 miles the first day, and 100 miles on 2/15 so I'm halfway to my 500 mile break-in period before I can exceed 4krpm.

 

Since I've always ridden antique bikes, I've been looking at this website and the schooling offered. I can see that with the increased HP it could be easy to get in trouble on my new bike if I'm not careful, but I want to get the most fun out of it also.

Doe the Level I, 1 day class translate well from the Track setting to the street?

 

I see two offers your bike / our bike

Which do people prefer? to learn on their own bike?

Will the Buell XB12R be out of place compared to other bikes in the class?

 

Thanks for any input - I'm looking at the Willow Spring classes

 

Gary

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Hello,

 

This past weekend I purchased my first new motorcycle ever.

I purchased a 2009 Buell XB12R

 

I've been riding bikes on the street for 30 years but they have all been antiques.

My business is manufacturing parts for Vintage Indian Motorcycles ( www.starklite.com )

 

With the incentives offered on the Buell's, and I could tell my father it's not a Harley, and the fact that I've always wanted something with a bit more HP than my 1947 Chief I made the decision to purchase the bike.

 

I purchased it on Sat 2/13, picked it up on 2/14. Rode the bike from Skip Fordyce HD in Riverside down to hwy 74 and out to the coast highway. Rode a total of 160 miles the first day, and 100 miles on 2/15 so I'm halfway to my 500 mile break-in period before I can exceed 4krpm.

 

Since I've always ridden antique bikes, I've been looking at this website and the schooling offered. I can see that with the increased HP it could be easy to get in trouble on my new bike if I'm not careful, but I want to get the most fun out of it also.

Doe the Level I, 1 day class translate well from the Track setting to the street?

 

I see two offers your bike / our bike

Which do people prefer? to learn on their own bike?

Will the Buell XB12R be out of place compared to other bikes in the class?

 

Thanks for any input - I'm looking at the Willow Spring classes

 

Gary

 

Hi Gary

welcome to the forum, The skills and techniques taught at the school are absolutely transferable to road riding, check out the twist of the wrist 2 DVD and you will see that the main characters begin their journey of improvement on the road! Just beware you may get hooked on track riding!

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Hi Gary,

 

For sure the skills will transfer, very well in fact.

 

There are pluses and minuses both ways: for some riding our bikes makes it very easy, and they don't have to worry about our bikes at all. Its also a very long day, you'll be worn out.

 

For others, they REALLY want to practice on their bikes.

 

Best thing to touch base with the office regarding availability, some dates are selling or sold out already.

 

Best,

Cobie

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When I do level 3-4, I'm hopefully going to do it on my bike. It will save a trunk load of money. The problem is location and getting my bike there. I did the Vegas school, and ended up bringing my own food anyway, so that doesn't matter, and as far as laptimes, at the end of day two they're spread out on a table and you get to sift through them for your times. The video of me riding doesn't even work. Those are the extra of what you pay for. And gear, but if you can get your bike there, I'm sure you can get the gear there.

 

The thing that makes it totally worth it is the instructors. All are approachable, Cobie is really nice and seems happy to take some time to talk to everyone, and the instruction given by Keith and his son are well done, and taught with enthusiasm. The information is invaluable to a rider improving.

 

If you look at any other school, the two day price is right in the middle of what you'll pay. If you can go for under $500 a day, it will be priceless. $500 a day for some of the best coaching and information in the US. Can't beat it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've ridden the Buell and looked closely at the BMW S1000RR. I believe you will find that almost all the skills you learn on the BMW will transfer seamlessly to you sporty new Buell. And don't forget, BMW has a distinguished history too! There is joy in that.

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Hi JasonZ,

 

Thanks for the nice words, didn't even bribe you :)

 

We usually keep the video after the school in case for any reason there is a problem. I'll ask Pete to see if we still have it, but for sure next time let us know (if you didn't already), so we can get you another CD. Sometimes there has been operator error, but if we know often can get you on the bike again.

 

Best,

CF

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Hi mrindian,

 

I've had a Buell XB12Ss for two years. I think you've made an excellent choice. The Buell is very easy to ride, a tremendous amount of fun and an incredibly good bike. I have no doubt that what I learn in Las Vegas in April will translate to better performance on my Buell very quickly. Cheers, CaperKen

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Like said above, there are some who want to have their own and there are some who like use the school bikes.

Here's my experience..

 

I was in the Level 2 training couple weeks ago and due to crashing my own bike few weeks before the training, I had to rent a bike.

 

I had big, big problems in the first and second track session. It felt like the bike was everywhere else except where I wanted it to be. It felt slippery and I was afraid to lean it over (needless to say, but I did not have any experience of that bike before jumping on it).

 

I already started thinking that the day would be horrible until the end, but then I had a chat with my coach (Mathew?) and we decided that I would concentrate on the trottle control in the third session (going back to basics).

 

Guess what. In the 3rd track session all fell into place and I was smiling and having fun again.

 

Thanks to Andy & team for fantastic day (evening) in Yas Marina.

 

(Pardon any mistakes in my writing..)

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I see two offers: your bike/our bike

Which do people prefer? To learn on their own bike?

Gary,

 

There's pros and cons to either, but when all is said and done, I think it makes more sense to ride one of CSS's bikes rather than your own. Using your own bike is just one more thing to worry about. If you use your bike, you have to get it to the track and back. That means either hauling it or riding it. Riding it is a bad idea 'cause you're gonna be exhausted after CSS and in no mood to ride your bike anywhere after a day of CSS track instruction. Hauling it isn't as bad as riding it, but you'll still have to load up at the end of the day, and that's a hassle when you're exhausted. Trust me when I tell you, at the end of CSS, you're gonna be sore and tired. It'll be nice to just slip off your leathers and get into your car without having to deal with loading up or riding out.

 

Also, the economics of using your own bike doesn't really add up. Using a CSS bike costs a couple hundred dollars more a day than using your own bike. But if you use your own bike, you'll put some serious wear on your tires. (Depending on your riding style and the tire, 2 or 3 track days is about all you're gonna get out of a sportbike street tire before it's spent.) When you factor in tire, (and, to a lesser extent, engine/brake/suspension), wear, it doesn't make sense. Why wear out your own tires? Save your tires for the track days you're gonna do waiting for your next CSS day.

 

And with Keith switching over to the new BMW 1000RR, this becomes a no-brainer. We can all ride our respective bikes whenever we want, but when and where else are you gonna get the chance to ride an RR on the track?

 

Just my opinion.

 

Elton

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Nicely put Elton! But then I'm biased. I will say even in the rain, those bikes were impressive, pretty sure everyone left the bikes in rain mode (only 150 HP), seemed to be enough for all :)

 

CF

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