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Charging The Turns


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Hi All

 

How can I stop myself charging the turns?

 

I attended levels 1 & 2 last year and all the info is still pretty much in my head as I took a lot of notes :-)

I finally booked a trackday last month but was constantly charging the turns :angry:

The trouble is i really do enjoy the full throttle/full braking and so end up doing it, as thats kind of why I go to the track, so that I can let rip, even though I know its not the fastest way. I will be going to Donington very soon and hope to be better.

How can I get past the red mist so that I can start to apply the techniques ??

Any tricks to help me focus would be greatly appreciated.

 

Ta

 

Colin

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So when you were charging the corners, were you missing apexes as a result? I found on level 2 recently that just winding things back a notch for a little while helps, once you're consistently hitting everything, you can start to wind the speed back on and maybe move some of your turn points or sharpen up your quick-turns?

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It sounds like you might not be finding good braking points, so you're slamming on too late. Find a reference point or two and stick to it, once you've tried it a few times then try moving it back or forth a bit if you find you're still going too fast, or letting off too soon before turning in.

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So when you were charging the corners, were you missing apexes as a result? I found on level 2 recently that just winding things back a notch for a little while helps, once you're consistently hitting everything, you can start to wind the speed back on and maybe move some of your turn points or sharpen up your quick-turns?

 

 

Yep, i was missing apexes, or sometimes had to scrub off that much speed, I ended up hitting the apexes way too slow due to spending $9.90 of my $10 dollars on braking. I know its wrong, but just can't help myself. I just gun it to the max laughin to myself in my helmet. I enjoy it, that is my problem. Need to find a mental trick to wind things back so i'm at 85% or so.

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Hitting your apexes too slow? If you're hitting your apex (especially if you're going too slow), you might want to look into your visual techniques. If you're overcooking it, you're going to be going too fast and be too stiff on the bars to hit your apex, let alone be going too slow when you get to them. Both of these problems will make you overshoot and miss the apex. Maybe when you're braking so hard, you're wide-eyed and focused on what's straight ahead of you and not on your turn points and where you're going after that. I'll bet if you work on vision (two step in particular), you'll realize you're not charging as much as you think you are.

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He may have to go slow because he's braking so hard to stop in time he has no grip to turn, something I'm very familiar with. You may overshoot the apex a little, but by the time you're ready to let off the brakes and turn, you are going slowly. Probably because our name isn't Lorenzo or Stoner ;)

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It is good you enjoy pinning the throttle and enjoying some speed rush. I think if you change your reference points and begin to roll out of the throttle and start braking a little bit sooner, then you should have your speed better set in time to hit your turn-in point. Properly applied, this should get you turned and back on the gas sooner, give you a better drive out of the corner, and allow you pin it even sooner. As Jason mentioned, the two-step can help with this.

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He may have to go slow because he's braking so hard to stop in time he has no grip to turn, something I'm very familiar with. You may overshoot the apex a little, but by the time you're ready to let off the brakes and turn, you are going slowly. Probably because our name isn't Lorenzo or Stoner ;)

 

Yep, thats exactly what i'm doing. Trouble is I am fully aware of it but somehow need to get myself down to 85% so I have got time to get my RP's sorted and 2 step etc. I think I need a mental trick to keep me at 85%, so that I have time to do all that I should be doing, I don't know, maybe i'll think of Vanessa Feltz before I go out on track, there again i'll probably crash :ph34r:

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Try this:

 

Instead of picking a Braking point, pick a Get Off the Brakes point. That way you can brake just as hard as you want and enjoy that rush of deceleration, have confidence that you can make your turn in and apex, and be in good shape to charge the straight.

 

If you like to point and shoot the bike, think of the turn as a little breather. In other words, think of getting off the brakes and around the corner as giving yourself time to take the slack out of the drive train in preparation for that rush of acceleration. Use the pause AFTER the braking is done to point the bike where you want to go and easy on some throttle.

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  • 1 year later...

Excuse me for asking this, but what is "charging a turn" exactly. I suspect it means entering too fast, but maybe this is not the whole story.

 

Welcome Duc of prunes!

 

I feel charging a turn is not a direct error, it's a symptom of other error(s) made ahead of the corner. 1st issue (and most inportant) is visual skills, rider would not have a good visually mark or "point of reference" for turn in and apex (search 2step and 3step). 2nd big issue is not setting entry speed (normally to fast, which is where "charging" comes from). There are other reasons too, such as being greedy or riding greater than ones 85% but the results are normally the same; inconsistant mid-turn throttle roll, steering corrections and being off intended line.

 

@boredcol - If you get a thrill from hard accel/decel, how would you feel about braking deeper into the corner and maybe with a later turn in point? They call it trailbraking and some are on the brakes all the way til corner apex. I also get a big kick out of braking so hard that it raises the rear tire or "floats" to my tun in point. But once I started trailbraking deeper, I found the thrill of being on the brakes with "some" lean angle at a "confident" pace was even more thrilling. Since my turn in point is later, I have to get on the brakes hard at first (so I get my thrill) and then I trail them off to set my entry speed. Depending on the corner, I will brake until apex and on others, it is before apex. Everything was smoother, settled and faster.

 

I must also let you know that this is not a novice completed skill and can easily put a rider in the gravel. Get education and training before you try it. High speed and a late entry is a recipe for disaster unless done properly and with confidence.

 

Let me ask you these questions and think about incentives.

Do you get passed on the inside or outside when you charge turns? Why?

How do you feel about your pace throughout a "section" of the track vs. a single turn?

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  • 4 years later...
On July 4, 2011 at 6:19 PM, bradvanhorn said:

It is good you enjoy pinning the throttle and enjoying some speed rush. I think if you change your reference points and begin to roll out of the throttle and start braking a little bit sooner, then you should have your speed better set in time to hit your turn-in point. Properly applied, this should get you turned and back on the gas sooner, give you a better drive out of the corner, and allow you pin it even sooner. As Jason mentioned, the two-step can help with this.

Good tip on charging 

 

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