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Lifting Front Wheel


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Hello Folks, I've been wanting to pull out of a turn that continues on to a long straight and lift te front wheel for a second as you see on races. Racers use it to gain a tad of speed while reducing front wheel contact.

My question is how? Comon sense tells me to turn in 3rd once bike is up pin it with out changing gear. Change gear to 4th to get the wheel down. BUT I would like to hear what other have to say.

 

I am fortunate to own a S1000RR with DTC ABS GA so I know bike won't flip back.

 

 

 

Thnks.

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I understand your wanting to do this... But I have to add that racers do NOT do this intentionally to gain speed, else they would just wheelie on all straights!!

 

Racers, and electronics made by the racer's engineering team, work very hard to keep the front wheel ON the ground. Front wheel lift robs the bike of accelerating power, as the torque is used to lift the bike, rather than propelling it forward, not to mention robbing the bike of the ability to steer properly...

 

So I still understand you wanting to lift the front, it looks cool as heck!! It shows you got great drive out of the corner.

 

But do it cuz it's cool, not to gain speed...

 

I would say second gear might be better for this than third...

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Hi,

 

Firstly I'll say that what you want to do, is a bit like leaning further only to get your knee down (increasing the risk of crashing). I would concentrate on going faster, running better lines and getting better drive, then it will come by itself (and you will feel it's a problem that it does, because you will feel the lost drive).

 

BUT, your running an almost 200bhp bike on track, there is no reason why you shouldn't wheelie at will..., so try to stand the bike up a bit while exiting, keeping revs just below max torque at apex (about 9000-10000rpm) and just wind-on as you start to lift the bike up.

 

I try to avoid wheelies (and stoppies as well, but that's another story) as it upsets the chassis, by keeping the revs above peak torque, then the bikes drive is at it's best.

 

Ronni

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Hello Folks, I've been wanting to pull out of a turn that continues on to a long straight and lift te front wheel for a second as you see on races. Racers use it to gain a tad of speed while reducing front wheel contact.

My question is how? Comon sense tells me to turn in 3rd once bike is up pin it with out changing gear. Change gear to 4th to get the wheel down. BUT I would like to hear what other have to say.

 

I am fortunate to own a S1000RR with DTC ABS GA so I know bike won't flip back.

 

 

 

Thnks.

 

Um... I am certainly not trying to encourage you to wheelie on your exits... but... what DTC mode are you in? I think the traction control will inhibit the wheelies, or just keep them so slight that you don't really feel it, depending on what mode you run. And that makes sense, since that would optimize your exits. As RonniB and DarkSuzuki said, it is hard to imagine that the bike would not wheelie easily, since it certainly has the horsepower, but maybe DTC is helping you keep that front wheel down.

 

(Just to be clear, I am NOT suggesting that you turn off the DTC, or that wheelie-ing out of the corners is a good idea...) :)

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The racers are at max traction. When traction control is turned down, they're more prone to little wheelies before it kicks in. They never intend to wheelie, the bike just lets them know it's past max traction when it's wheelying. Small wheelie: just past. Big wheelie: way past.

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