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Does My Sense Of Speed ... Well Is It Not So Good?


gogogusgus
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Most of what I do is work on my vision. Vision is the hugest deal. Head up and out. Peripheral vision.

 

The last corner I had problems with was because of vision. I took half the morning working on one turn, not able to get it right, and just too slow. After a couple of sessions, I figured my problem was with fixating on my turn point. I was braking AND turning left, and the next corner was a right hand turn. It was tricky, but the basics are what they are. I had to trust my periphery and it righted itself instantly (because of my experience and understanding of this). The rest of the afternoon was spent making my correction habit.

 

Keep working on what you've been taught and you'll get better.

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Hey Ago,

 

What have you done so far to improve it? What specifically do you want to improve? Can you tell if you are going faster or slower than the lap before?

 

Best,

 

CF

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Try this one:

 

Learn to see the vanishing point, then just ride and practice watching the vanishing point all the way through the turn.

 

When your vision catches on something (to pick a turn point, look at a rock, check out that car), mentally says, "Yup," (short for, "Yup, my vision caught on that,") then go back to watching the vanishing point.

 


  •  
  • See if you can read when corners are opening up or closing down.
  • Notice when you feel uncomfortable because you are looking TOO far down the road.
  • See how you feel when you can't see far into the turn.
  • Notice how you feel as you lean the bike.
  • See when you want to get back on the gas.
  • Notice how your body reacts to seeing cars or sand way down the t-h-e-r-e.
  • Sense if your speed feel faster or slower.

 

I enjoy riding this way. I could tell you what I notice, but that might prejudice your experience and your experience might be completely different than mine. If you decide to try it, I'd love to read your response.

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fixating on my turn point. I was braking AND turning left, and the next corner was a right hand turn

  1. were you braking while turning?
  2. was it on Willow, NJMP or VIR, just so I might be able to picture the corner, if not, was it an Ess?
  3. was the solution working on the 2 or 3 step drills?

Ago

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Cobie

What specifically do you want to improve?
I read in Twist that racers know within 1/2 mph ... "the sheer terror of braking" ... and just want to get my sense in a narrower range.

I want to hone my sense of speed so i don't jam braking / downshifting / body pos into too small a space, nor too large a space.

 

WCan you tell if you are going faster or slower than the lap before?

Stopwatch timing at Summit Point and CSS laptimes at Willow suggest i'm going faster session to session, with some outliers within one session.

Does this make any sense?

Ago

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Question: how does one know WHERE they are getting faster?

 

Most people tape the speedo so it isn't a distraction, so you can't mentally think "ok, last lap at this corner I was doing __ mph going in and __ coming out"...

 

Lap times only give an overall view. How does one know which areas/ sections/ corners time is made up, if they don't have the ability to record detailed split times for each section lap after lap?

 

Is it by mentally using your RPs to gauge/ remember where you were the previous lap regarding braking, throttle crack, roll-on start, and how soon until hard on the gas out of the corner?

 

-Christian

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I doubt they can sense 1/2 mph or even 1 mph as such. Instead, I think they can feel it when they go around a corner a little better, when they save 1/10 of a second in a section, that sort of thing. If you exit corner A the same way you always have, you will arrive at corner B at a given speed when you hit the brakes at your marker. You could then try to move your braking point until you can no longer complete the corner like you want. And/or you can try to start accelerating a little sooner lap after lap until you either start sliding more than you like or run wide. I bet you will feel yourself going faster. And slower if you miss your various markers.

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Ago,

 

The point on faster or slower than the time before applies to a particular turn. Can you tell if you are going faster, slower, or the same? A good starting point might be to actually just duplicate the speed, slightly less than max pace.

 

As to whether a top racer can tell, here is a figure from a GP some years ago: a top racer in 1 turn, timed by Keith Code: 3 laps in a row, same 1/100 of a second, 8.69. Yeah, I think he has a pretty good idea of how to recreate a speed.

 

If top racers can do laps within a few tenths of a second for the whole lap, then their sense of speed must be pretty darn good turn by turn, don't you think?

 

Best,

CF

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Perhaps we're just using different terms. I believe racers can feel easily whether they go faster or slower, lap by lap and sector by sector - even tiny differences. But if you put them on a long straight and asked them to do a steady 79.5 mph one time and 80 mph the next without a tacho or speedo, I do not think they would pass. I'd be happy to be proven wrong, though :D In fact, I doubt they would be able to keep the speed within 0.5 mph for a mile even if they tried to keep the speed dead steady.

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