Jump to content

Braking With Abs


Gr8Dane
 Share

Recommended Posts

We've all heard the stories about someone claiming to deliberately have 'laid the bike down' to avoid an accident, right?

 

Complete and utter BS. Bike went down because the rider panicked and locked up the brakes. Period. Sliding on asphalt towards an immovable object is not the preferred way to avoid hitting said object. Keeping the bike upright, under maximum braking is.

 

ABS is a life saver. I have been riding BMW's with ABS since 1994. My current street bike is an 03 K 1200 GT.

Up until I got my S 1000 RR, I have ridden the K bike exclusively while coaching track days for the local BMW dealer.

 

Sometimes the guys brought their crotch rockets, such as 1000 Gixxers to these events. Blew past me on the straights. I could out-brake every single one of them at the end. I can brake harder on that BMW than I ever did on my Yamaha R1 track bike. The amount of confidence, peace of mind offered by ABS is just amazing.

 

The S1000 RR ABS is leap years better than anything I have ever had the pleasure of riding. Keep in mind that the four individual settings affect not just the ABS, but also the power delivery, Traction control and Wheelie control.

 

 

With simple push-button activation, the S 1000 RR rider may scroll through these four settings:

  • "Rain" Mode
  • "Sport" Mode for aggressive street riding
  • "Race" Mode for track days with DOT tires or very aggressive canyon carving
  • "Slick" Mode : full blown racetrack set-up

Most of us on this forum will never use the "Rain" mode. The Traction Control and ABS is way too intrusive for the kind of riding we would like to think we are doing, but, it's a perfect setting for a novice. Not that I would let a novice anywhere near MY S 1000 RR. LOL

 

"Sport" mode - perfect for the average street ride. Gobs of power, pop all the wheelies you want, brake hard, have fun. Still too intrusive for me.

 

"Race" mode - just what I ( can't speak for you) want for aggressive canyon carving. I braked hard enough to chirp the front tire, (not what I would normally do, but wanted to find out if it was possible), then the weight transfer just plants the front tire. Amazing!

 

Never lacking for power, either. Just perfect.

 

"Slick" mode - pure race. Keep it on the track. This mode truly unleashes the massive potential of the bike, but still keeps a minimally intrusive safety net under you.

 

Read on (this is an excerpt from the technical literature published by BMW, with my comments in ITALICS) :

 

The BMW Motorrad Race ABS is an all new development that again is considerably lighter than the previous partially integral systems. Featuring a controller of only 1.5 kg and weighing it at only 2.5 kg in total, it is the ideal solution for installation in supersports motorcycles. Besides its low weight, the system is characterised above all by a regulation that has been improved even further.

 

Ok, that's German English: Here's what I think they are trying to say: BMW RACE ABS is a lightweight, fully integrated ABS, with corresponding Engine management and Traction control systems weighing a mere 5.5 lbs, and has a more advanced management system. Just my guess...)

 

This was made possible not only by the outstanding tuning, but also by the use of four pressure sensors in total that, in conjunction with highly complex rear wheel lift detection, can now differentiate better than before between a bump in the road and a locked up rear wheel.

 

Here's what I think they mean: Previous, less advanced ABS systems can be tricked into pulsing when a ripple in the road suddenly unloads the tire while braking. I know that feeling. My 2003 K 1200 GT does that to me all the time. Feels like you suddenly lost the brakes for a very long split second. This feeling is exacerbated by a rather slow pulse frequency.

Pressing the hand brake lever (over here we just grab the front brake) activates the two-rotor disc brake on the front wheel, whereas only a light braking force is applied to the rear wheel. The foot brake lever activates solely the rear wheel brake. In the riding modes "Race" and "Slick", the rear wheel lift detection does not intervene in the rider's braking manoeuvres (guess that means we don't really need it anyway?). In addition, the "Slick" mode allows particularly experienced riders to perform so called braking drifts (In American English we call that backing it into the corner) without having to dispense with the benefits of a front wheel ABS. (VERY COOL!)

 

A fourth pressure sensor in the front wheel circuit allows regulation of the front wheel brake pressure that is more refined and sensitive than the predecessor BMW integral ABS II. This is because the actual pressure values can be compared directly in the control and wheel circuit. (Inquisitive minds are going to want to know exactly how it does that?) This also means that the restriction orifices are no longer needed, resulting in the optimal pressure point and the perfect dosability. ( I have no clue what this means, but I know it works!)For special requirements, Race ABS can be deactivated separately.

 

Although the new system, like every other ABS, cannot redefine the constraints posed by the laws of physics, the new Race ABS provides the rider with invaluable support and an enormous boost to safety.

 

AMEN!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My experience on the S1000RR has been with CSS so I have not tested out the ABS to the extent you have. That said, I have really enjoyed the traction control. I have appreciated the progression from Rain to Sport modes (I don't believe CSS wants students using Race mode on their bikes - and to be fair I haven't needed it, plenty to work on in Sport).

 

Over the last year I have been debating buying a track bike (my street ride is a K1200R) and the prevailing advice from track riders is go with a 600. They are inexpensive (relatively), fast enough (at least for my skill level) and less likely to get you in trouble than a 1000 (w/o TC). That said, I keep coming back to the great experience I have had riding the S1000RR. I can’t justify having one dedicated to the track but I have toyed with the idea of trading the KR for one and having it pull double duty. They aren’t much for touring but then again neither am I.

 

 

 

Decisions, decisions…

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've all heard the stories about someone claiming to deliberately have 'laid the bike down' to avoid an accident, right?

 

Complete and utter BS. Bike went down because the rider panicked and locked up the brakes. Period. Sliding on asphalt towards an immovable object is not the preferred way to avoid hitting said object. Keeping the bike upright, under maximum braking is.

 

 

 

 

Actually there were/are people who /were/ trained to slide the bike down in a panic situation like that. This might be 20+ years ago as nowadays its better to reduce speed and keep traction with current day brakes and tires. Mostly in law enforcement where they are taught this and actually do it. I know a few people who have put a few bikes down this way in the past. It becomes instinct to them since they are trained this way. They know that this isn't the case these days with modern tech in brakes/wheels/etc. So I don't agree it would be "complete and utter BS" from everybody.

 

That being said - the BMW S1000RR is a great bike. It has modern tech and is just an overall great bike. My issue with the BMW is that its just that - its a BMW. Its german and teutonic. Some like it that way, but its just not me. It performs better than the majority of all bikes, but it just doesn't move the soul for me. And I prefer bikes (and cars) that move the soul and stir a reaction. . . I equate the BMW S1000RR to like a Mercedes AMG S55, BMW M5, Porsche 911. All great performing cars and all near the top in performance. But I'm going to buy a bike that will move my soul - so I would end up with a Ducati PanigaleS or MV Agusta F4R/RR or something along those lines. Yeah - the BMW s1000rr might out perform it (though they are all close), just like a 911 Turbo outperforms most other cars, but the feeling is just different. With cars, it would be like the Porsche 911 vs say a Ferrari, Lambo or Aston.

 

The good thing is that most of these manufacturers all have traction control and ABS on their bikes. Which means at least the bike will try and save your arse a little when you get into more trouble than you should be. . ..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"That being said - the BMW S1000RR is a great bike. It has modern tech and is just an overall great bike. My issue with the BMW is that its just that - its a BMW. Its german and teutonic."

 

All I can say is: go ride one. You would never know it's a BMW. Feels just like a japanese superbike. With an edge in both performance, safety and confidence building.

 

"Some like it that way, but its just not me. It performs better than the majority of all bikes, but it just doesn't move the soul for me. And I prefer bikes (and cars) that move the soul and stir a reaction. . . I equate the BMW S1000RR to like a Mercedes AMG S55, BMW M5, Porsche 911"

 

Nah, those are passenger cars. I would compare it to the 911 GT3 RS. A barely street legal race car.

 

 

"But I'm going to buy a bike that will move my soul - so I would end up with a Ducati PanigaleS or MV Agusta F4R/RR or something along those lines. Yeah - the BMW s1000rr might out perform it (though they are all close), just like a 911 Turbo outperforms most other cars, but the feeling is just different. With cars, it would be like the Porsche 911 vs say a Ferrari, Lambo or Aston."

 

OK, valid point: one of the most awesome cars I have driven is the Lamborghini Gallardo Superleggera. Stunning looks, fantastic handling and power.....delivered via ..........Audi engineering and drive-train :D

 

 

 

"The good thing is that most of these manufacturers all have traction control and ABS on their bikes. Which means at least the bike will try and save your arse a little when you get into more trouble than you should be. . .."

 

Agreed. Ultimately, our choices are emotional. As it should be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I should add - I have ridden the BMW S1000RR on the track with CSS and friends who have the bike. . . I have never said it wasn't a great bike. I just wouldn't buy one. There are a lot of bikes I would acquire before I'd get that one. I'd have a Ducati Panigale S, F4 RR, 1098R, even the 848Evo, Aprila RSV4, possibly a Motus or whatever. I would get one before I got a CBR or something (and not knocking that bike either). Just saying its Teutonic and lacks a "soul" for /me/.

 

And as I said - the Porsche is a great car to drive. but you get a different feeling if you are driving a Ferrari Scuderia or as you mentioned the Lamborhini. The feeling is a lot more visceral. . .

 

but always glad to have the choice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've all heard the stories about someone claiming to deliberately have 'laid the bike down' to avoid an accident, right?

 

Haha, it's always funny when someone says that. What's the definition of an accident, again? rolleyes.gif

(People who "lay it down" don't avoid an accident - they create one!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...