Jump to content

Style - Styling Or Function?


faffi
 Share

Recommended Posts

Not sure what sportbike has the most radical riding position, but I believe the old Ducati 916 ranks near the front in that respect. And to me, watching a 916 in traffic - especially when carrying a passenger - looks every bit as silly as a Harley rider stretching to reach the ape hangers above his head and the footpeg just out of reach in front.

 

 

So, here's my question; is the forward slope of modern sportbikes a result of styling or function? What are the benefits? Because I can surely see some negatives;

 

- harder to support your body during hard stops

 

- less leverage when changing direction

 

- more tiresome to ride for prolonged periods

 

- harder to look ahead and to the sides

 

 

So, what's the deal? Where are the benefits? Because I presume there must be some since MotoGP bikes are designed this way as their main priority is (or should be) winning races.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK,

 

1. You apply force much more efficiently to the bars, no force is going in a downwards direction, but is all going horizontally towards the bars. Add in the effect of pushing off your opposite leg and 'power steering' as Keith calls it and you can apply some serious pressure to the bars.

2. It's much more aerodynamic.

3. Your weight is down low and towards the front of the bike, which is a much better place for keeping the front wheel on the ground.

 

It's actually not more tiresome to ride, once you get used to supporting yourself with your legs it's fine, plus unlike a naked where you get blasted with wind, the wind effect simply supports your upper body and takes even more weight off your wrists. As for looking ahead and to the sides, you can see straight ahead just fine, likewise to the sides.

 

Most of the downsides you list are merely practical ones which will be given zero consideration when the sole purpose of these bikes is to go as fast as possible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

everybody's body is different

what works for a certain demographic might not work for others imho. :P

 

i have long legs for my height and that makes me ###### out of luck on most yamahas. Kawasaki's... i find it MUCH more comfy. YMMV

Really? I use 38" inseam, and have never owned anything but Yamaha bikes.

But clearly YMMV.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

everybody's body is different

what works for a certain demographic might not work for others imho. :P

 

i have long legs for my height and that makes me ###### out of luck on most yamahas. Kawasaki's... i find it MUCH more comfy. YMMV

Really? I use 38" inseam, and have never owned anything but Yamaha bikes.

But clearly YMMV.

I love the FZ6/1's the FZ6R, not so much cuz it cramps up my legs, FML because the new FZ6R is a real looker :(

 

Tried a ER6N 2 days back and instant nice fit imho. :D

PS> just measured my leg, 38" too!! but my foot to knee is a full 19" >< (21" if i do a 90 degree top out measure)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK,

 

1. You apply force much more efficiently to the bars, no force is going in a downwards direction, but is all going horizontally towards the bars. Add in the effect of pushing off your opposite leg and 'power steering' as Keith calls it and you can apply some serious pressure to the bars.

2. It's much more aerodynamic.

3. Your weight is down low and towards the front of the bike, which is a much better place for keeping the front wheel on the ground.

 

It's actually not more tiresome to ride, once you get used to supporting yourself with your legs it's fine, plus unlike a naked where you get blasted with wind, the wind effect simply supports your upper body and takes even more weight off your wrists. As for looking ahead and to the sides, you can see straight ahead just fine, likewise to the sides.

 

Most of the downsides you list are merely practical ones which will be given zero consideration when the sole purpose of these bikes is to go as fast as possible.

 

 

+1 on the above, and I will add that on the racetrack, I do not find the forward, aggressive position of the sportbikes particularly tiring, but on the STREET it totally wears me out, my back and arms get tired, I think it is the low speeds and all the starting and stopping, especially sitting still at lights which is quite uncomfortable unless you let go of the bars and sit up straight.

 

I have also tried riding a more street-oriented, upright bike on the racetrack and found that at high speeds I was blasted by the wind (despite the windscreen), heavy acceleration tended to pull my shoulders backwards, and the rear end of the bike felt unstable at very high speeds, so I did notice a difference not having that low, crouched position that we have on the sportbikes. But that particular bike was my all-time favorite for street riding, it handled very well, had loads of power, had a nice comfortable riding position, a slightly lower seat height, etc. I never had any comfort or handling issues at street or highway speeds, and I thought it would do OK on the track... but it didn't! It's just a different type of riding, and it is probably extraordinarily difficult to buld a bike that would excel at both.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK,

 

1. You apply force much more efficiently to the bars, no force is going in a downwards direction, but is all going horizontally towards the bars. Add in the effect of pushing off your opposite leg and 'power steering' as Keith calls it and you can apply some serious pressure to the bars.

2. It's much more aerodynamic.

3. Your weight is down low and towards the front of the bike, which is a much better place for keeping the front wheel on the ground.

 

It's actually not more tiresome to ride, once you get used to supporting yourself with your legs it's fine, plus unlike a naked where you get blasted with wind, the wind effect simply supports your upper body and takes even more weight off your wrists. As for looking ahead and to the sides, you can see straight ahead just fine, likewise to the sides.

 

Most of the downsides you list are merely practical ones which will be given zero consideration when the sole purpose of these bikes is to go as fast as possible.

 

 

+1 on the above, and I will add that on the racetrack, I do not find the forward, aggressive position of the sportbikes particularly tiring, but on the STREET it totally wears me out, my back and arms get tired, I think it is the low speeds and all the starting and stopping, especially sitting still at lights which is quite uncomfortable unless you let go of the bars and sit up straight.

 

I have also tried riding a more street-oriented, upright bike on the racetrack and found that at high speeds I was blasted by the wind (despite the windscreen), heavy acceleration tended to pull my shoulders backwards, and the rear end of the bike felt unstable at very high speeds, so I did notice a difference not having that low, crouched position that we have on the sportbikes. But that particular bike was my all-time favorite for street riding, it handled very well, had loads of power, had a nice comfortable riding position, a slightly lower seat height, etc. I never had any comfort or handling issues at street or highway speeds, and I thought it would do OK on the track... but it didn't! It's just a different type of riding, and it is probably extraordinarily difficult to buld a bike that would excel at both.

 

 

 

 

active ergo anyone?(think motorized car seats and active aero on a bike) (but i think its gonna compromise on the weight)

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...