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Tire Profiles


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Pointy or round profile. Your preference and why? GO! :)

 

I recently switched from a pointy profile tire to a round profile tire and it was a bit of an adjustment. I find that I really like the round profile but I'm interested in seeing other points of view on this.

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I prefer a 'neutral' profile, where the tyre gives the bike a constant turn-in. I've tried a very pointy profile (IIRC Metzeler Sportec M3), which made the bike feel rather 'nervous': it felt like the front was "searching" for the right lean angle, which I didn't find very comfort inspiring.

 

However, this was on a R1 2003, which turns very easily. On a heavier-steering bike, a pointy tyre might be just the right thing.

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I switched from a Dunlop Q3 to a Pirelli Supercorsa SP. The Pirelli has a lot more grip but adapting to the new profile is interesting. The Q3 seemed more eager to turn and sometimes this created surprises. The Pirelli is more constant but I find I still have not really adapted 100% to it's constant turn in.

 

I'm not to the point of wanting to switch tires but just wanted to get some other opinions.

 

Speaking of that. Do you guys change your technique any because of the differences in tire? Do you quick steer differently or change anything else?

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I prefer a 'neutral' profile, where the tyre gives the bike a constant turn-in. I've tried a very pointy profile (IIRC Metzeler Sportec M3), which made the bike feel rather 'nervous': it felt like the front was "searching" for the right lean angle, which I didn't find very comfort inspiring.

 

However, this was on a R1 2003, which turns very easily. On a heavier-steering bike, a pointy tyre might be just the right thing.

 

I agree, I prefer the rounder profile to let me pick whatever lean angle I want instead of being somewhat pushed into a lean angle preferred by the tire, but I never thought about it feeling different with a heavier steering bike and I think this is a very valid point.

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I switched from a Dunlop Q3 to a Pirelli Supercorsa SP. The Pirelli has a lot more grip but adapting to the new profile is interesting. The Q3 seemed more eager to turn and sometimes this created surprises. The Pirelli is more constant but I find I still have not really adapted 100% to it's constant turn in.

 

I'm not to the point of wanting to switch tires but just wanted to get some other opinions.

 

Speaking of that. Do you guys change your technique any because of the differences in tire? Do you quick steer differently or change anything else?

 

I haven't ridden very much on "pointier" tiers but when I did, I tended to change my lines to use more lean angle, to let the tire go to its sweet spot lean angle. For sure the tires had a lot of grip, but when coaching and having to vary my pace a lot from a student to student, I found the more triangular tires a little bothersome because sometimes I wanted a gentler turn-in and/or less lean angle. For going at a consistent fast pace, I might be willing to accept a more triangular profile if I felt it was a significant improvement in grip or stability. Incidentally I don't mind a steeper profile on the rear tire, but I really notice it on the front; a while back Michelin changed the rear tire profile first, which didn't bother me, but when they went more aggressive on the front I didn't like it at all.

 

I tried the Pirelli slicks on my SuperSingle and didn't like the steep turn-in, but that is a tall and very light-weight bike and the effect may be greatly exaggerated, something I hadn't considered until reading khp's post above.

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Well basically if someone wants to choose a tire profile he also needs to think in what kind of bike he will use them besides his preference. A lightweight, nervous bike will be very difficult to make brake and turn in fast without scaring you. I have used Pirelli SuperBike, Michelin Slick with V profile and Dunlop KR Slick tires. All of them are the best competition tires of each brand. The most aggressive profile of all was the front Michelin V profile. When you first tried to turn it your first thought was I "feel down". It needs more power to turn because they are heavier but when you start turning, your brain needs to be recalibrated for that front tire. The Dunlop was in the middle with a bit more round profile than Michelin but still aggressive.The Pirelli has a more round profile of the three and its more predictive.Its lighter and needs less power to turn but it does not "fall" as the other tires. I personally like the Dunlop better and choose them to be my tires for the track.

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I switched from a Dunlop Q3 to a Pirelli Supercorsa SP. The Pirelli has a lot more grip but adapting to the new profile is interesting. The Q3 seemed more eager to turn and sometimes this created surprises. The Pirelli is more constant but I find I still have not really adapted 100% to it's constant turn in.

 

I'm not to the point of wanting to switch tires but just wanted to get some other opinions.

 

Speaking of that. Do you guys change your technique any because of the differences in tire? Do you quick steer differently or change anything else?

 

I haven't ridden very much on "pointier" tiers but when I did, I tended to change my lines to use more lean angle, to let the tire go to its sweet spot lean angle. For sure the tires had a lot of grip, but when coaching and having to vary my pace a lot from a student to student, I found the more triangular tires a little bothersome because sometimes I wanted a gentler turn-in and/or less lean angle. For going at a consistent fast pace, I might be willing to accept a more triangular profile if I felt it was a significant improvement in grip or stability. Incidentally I don't mind a steeper profile on the rear tire, but I really notice it on the front; a while back Michelin changed the rear tire profile first, which didn't bother me, but when they went more aggressive on the front I didn't like it at all.

 

I tried the Pirelli slicks on my SuperSingle and didn't like the steep turn-in, but that is a tall and very light-weight bike and the effect may be greatly exaggerated, something I hadn't considered until reading khp's post above.

 

 

You may want to try the the Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SC's on the super-single, as the "Superbike" slicks are advertised as "2% taller". So it might be that the Diablo Supercorsa will feel more neutral to you.

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I recall the Dunlop D205 (something few if any of you have ever considered for anything) made the bike flop on its side quickly, the requiring a lot of effort to lean further from a particular angle. I liked the instant reaction, but strongly disliked the way the steering effort changed with lean angle. I very much prefer tyres that feel neutral from upright to full lean while offering the least amount of steering effort delivering that sensation.

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