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yakaru

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yakaru last won the day on May 3

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About yakaru

  • Birthday May 30

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  • Have you attended a California Superbike School school?
    Yes, many many times

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Seattle, WA & Las Vegas, NV

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  1. The school will tape over it if you don't, for general track days I generally keep mine taped as well -- no reason to look at it.
  2. Painters tape is great since it won't leave much residue when you take it off. I tend to tape over all front and back lights when I bring a street bike. For "bonus points" you can also pull the fuse for the lights, but not strictly required. I went and found some old pictures of when I took my street bike to the track -- I'm pretty meticulous, no need to be this neat if you don't want to be, but here's an example:
  3. Oh no, not VIR! Barber and VIR both are among my favorite tracks (and that opinion is shared many of the coaches too, by my understanding). Sad to miss Barber this year, but sadly I have to earn a living and only can afford so many days off and so many school tuitions.
  4. A bit off topic but on the "wild racers cutting up people" -- I've said on more than one occasion that Trevor runs a tight ship in terms of course control and if there were orgs that followed his standards I'd go to them far more readily than some of the guys who think they need to ride at 110% to make sure they pass everyone even if it means they end up lowsiding or otherwise getting themselves and others in trouble every other track day.
  5. Sometimes I find that the camps are easier -- the breaks can be welcome but humans tend to have the ability for endurance to persist as long as needed. Without breaks my body never finds the time to "let itself be tired", whereas with regular schools sometimes the breaks, especially on a hot day, can cause the desire to cat nap. But obviously in the end the actual requirements for the camps are higher and Hotfoot's suggestions are spot on -- ramp up evenly, hydrate, eat rationally and you'll be good; if you work on endurance as well as upper leg and core muscles you'll be golden.
  6. If your throttle position is steady then generally you are able to counter steer to change/increase lean. This is particularly relevant on smaller bikes and/or faster series of corners -- there are places where you just pause the roll on without the need to roll off. A related case might be double apex corners, which can often have a point where you pause or slightly roll off to let the bike tighten/repoint, but usually you want to avoid extra steering inputs in a corner if you can. It's better than chopping the throttle, which actually widens the turn for a period, lowers ground clearance, and all sorts of other nastiness. However you are going to have less available tire load for this action compared to rolling off, and you don't get the benefits of geometry that rolling off/braking can give in terms of handling. But if you've gotten into a corner and realize you've made a mistake, a pause or gentle roll off on the throttle is definitely better than to keep rolling on while adding lean (recipe for a crash) or chopping the throttle and getting thrown wide at the same time you're trying to tighten the turn.
  7. For the camp obviously there is the school provided bike. I’ve got my s1000rr and hp4 both already there; and as much as I’d love to bring one of my small bikes I need the trailer space free to bring those back home after. Cobie recommended the s1000 for the tryout.
  8. I am! And then right after I have my coach tryout on the 20th so hopefully I'll have the rust knocked off from this winter and my studying will have stayed in my brain!
  9. As a sort of 'add on' to this topic: back in '19 I was at Barber and was hitting a pretty solid pace and hit the point where for some of the faster sections I found I benefited from both pushing and pulling simultaneously to get a strong enough input in to overcome momentum and get the bike on lean/line without being too abrupt about it; in addition to weighting my outside peg which of course also can help.
  10. I haven’t done Sonoma but on streets here’s what I can say: it’s the “home track” for css and it is short and has a ton of different types of technical challenges. That means you get more laps to work on something (and probably more laps with your coach) in the same amount of time. flipside is that it is in rough shape pavement wise and doesn’t have any great places to “wring out” a literbike (If you want to have fun passing big boys on a 250 though it is the place to do it). Sonoma I’ve heard good things about, and obviously it’s part of several racing series so I can’t imagine it being a bad choice either.
  11. Thanks for the report on that post, I nuked it.

    Best,

    Cobie

  12. I saw the lubricant is up on https://superbikeschool.com/sponsors/ but I haven’t seen anything on the new helmet brand. Assume we will hear soon?
  13. For what it's worth, I actually had to sort of deal with the opposite problem. My instincts when passed are to back off and give the person room so I don't have to worry about them anymore, and when I started racing this was hard to unlearn; nowadays I struggle more with picking my passes, especially when in 'packs' where I don't want to pass someone then have to change lines or hit my brakes due to someone in front of them while at the same time not staying at the back longer than I have to. One thing that may help with the urge (over time, not immediately) is moving to a lower displacement bike -- I get passed all the time on 250s and 300s going down straights without any ego involved since they have more than 5 times my horsepower. As I've gotten better it's now a game to pass them back in the corners but that can be quite hard if they have good lines and skill.
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