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Sport Rider Mag Andrew Trevitt Seriously Injured

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Sucks to hear. A rider from my group is in the hospital. Some dude ran a red, and Paul hit his door, and reportedly bounced off another car or two before stopping. He has opened his eyes, and is able to communicate and follow simple commands. He actually separated a lung from his trachea, and they needed a transplant surgeon to reattach it. We just had a fund raiser for him, and the community really showed up.

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Sucks to hear. A rider from my group is in the hospital. Some dude ran a red, and Paul hit his door, and reportedly bounced off another car or two before stopping. He has opened his eyes, and is able to communicate and follow simple commands. He actually separated a lung from his trachea, and they needed a transplant surgeon to reattach it. We just had a fund raiser for him, and the community really showed up.

WoW. Sounds like an endorsement for a chest protector. Sorry for your bud.

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I get one step closer to "track only" everyday.

 

On October 25, 1993, I was hit on my GPz750 by a car that turned left across my lane from the oncoming lane. To be precise, the car that was waiting to turn left from the oncoming lane, waited as I traveled about two hundred feet until I was right in front of him and then stepped on the gas head-on into my lane. I hit his front bumper at approximately the speed limit of 25 mph. Being that the front bumper was still at a 45 degree angle on impact, my front wheel cocked right and the left handlebar made contact with the hood at speed with my hand still wrapped around it.

 

The left handlebar with my hand wrapped around it was driven straight back into my forearm crushing the distal end of the ulna and radius into approximately 18 pieces. In the e-room, the doctor said my hand might be saved if they did a bone graft from my hips and fused my wrist. I grabbed his tie (with my right hand) and told him that, if he couldn't make it like new again, I would fly Dr Costa in from Italy to teach him how.

 

(The following morning, a local spine specialist spent about 16 hours finding all the little bits and using toothpicks and an external fixater to put humpy dumpy together again.)

 

October 25, 1993, was the last day I ever rode a motorcycle on the street. I went on racing to put in the best races of my career over the next five years.

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On October 25, 1993, I was hit on my GPz750 by a car that turned left across my lane from the oncoming lane. To be precise, the car that was waiting to turn left from the oncoming lane, waited as I traveled about two hundred feet until I was right in front of him and then stepped on the gas head-on into my lane.

 

October 25, 1993, was the last day I ever rode a motorcycle on the street. I went on racing to put in the best races of my career over the next five years.

My understanding is this kind of thing happens often. What was the other driver's story? I can't understand how something like this would happen, yet you hear about it frequently. The answer always seems to be the driver just didn't see them. I wonder if there is something that can be done to prevent this but I haven't come up with any great ideas.

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My understanding is this kind of thing happens often. What was the other driver's story? I can't understand how something like this would happen, yet you hear about it frequently. The answer always seems to be the driver just didn't see them. I wonder if there is something that can be done to prevent this but I haven't come up with any great ideas.

I've read the opinion that car drivers don't view motorcycles as a "threat" like they would an on-comming Ford Expedition and just dismiss cycles from their concern. I have a flicker switch on my light switch that allows me to quickly alternate the high and low beams of my lights and I use it ALL the time when I approach an intersection. Others put super bright head lamps in to make themselves more visable but at the end of the day, we all ride on the street with a considerable amount of risk from inattentive drivers who turn left at will.

 

Kevin

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On October 25, 1993, I was hit on my GPz750 by a car that turned left across my lane from the oncoming lane. To be precise, the car that was waiting to turn left from the oncoming lane, waited as I traveled about two hundred feet until I was right in front of him and then stepped on the gas head-on into my lane.

 

October 25, 1993, was the last day I ever rode a motorcycle on the street. I went on racing to put in the best races of my career over the next five years.

My understanding is this kind of thing happens often. What was the other driver's story? I can't understand how something like this would happen, yet you hear about it frequently. The answer always seems to be the driver just didn't see them.

 

It was pretty freaky. There is no doubt in my mind to this day that the guy hit me on purpose. I held eye contact with him as I approached the intersection. I looked away as I passed the point of no return and that is when he pulled out. The driver admitted on the scene that he saw me coming and claimed that "he didn't realize I was going so fast". *Cough, cough* ...Bull! I was traveling the speed limit and rolled off the gas as I approached the intersection. The fact is that I was going slowly and he got tired of waiting, and, most likely in a moment of frustration, decided to go for it at the last second. I watched the indecision on his face as I came down the hill toward the intersection. We've all been there. Waiting to turn across oncoming traffic. Should I go, should I wait, ah, f**k it!

 

I don't know for sure what was on his mind, but, there were, thankfully, many witnesses who supported my version of events to the police. I was so blown away by what the guy had done, I told the cops that they should give him a breathalizer test or take blood. I was sure he had to be high on something. For whatever reason, the cops decided not to give him any sobriety test. Perhaps he didn't show any outward signs of intoxication or smell of alcohol, but, his actions would seem to speak volumes about his state of mind.

 

As for what can be done, I think Kevin's idea is a good one. Anything that makes you more visible. I've already told you my solution. Nothing personal against anyone here, but, I won't even ride a public "track day" event or get on a hot track with anyone who doesn't have a racing license. And, even then, I come across riders who do stupid stuff or simply don't have the appropriate skill set and are, IMO, a danger to themselves and others. Honestly, with the increasing incidence and popularity of "open to the public" track days, I think there is a real need for "policing" these types of events by some sanctioning body. In other words, vetting riders with something more than just "slow group" / "fast group", and relying on a handful of control riders to keep an eye on things as they themselves are riding around. I don't know. Maybe I am being overly anal about safety in my old age. (Or maybe I almost lost my hand and did lose my ability to play the piano and violin with anything like the skill I once did. And, am now apparently suffering from advanced traumatic arthritis in my wrist, elbow and neck.)

 

In any case, there are people out there who hate us. Especially in the USA. They watch us split lanes through rush hour traffic at a dead stop on a six lane highway and it pisses them off. I've seen people open their car door to stop a motorcyclist splitting lanes in rush hour on the LIE in New York. Not very bright. Luckily the biker stopped in time. The point is, there really are freaking crazy people out there with anger or evil in their hearts. And if one of them gets a bead on you, there isn't a whole lot you can do except to avoid them. In the meantime, install a wig wag circuit like Kevin did and use lots of lights and reflective tape or paint and wear bightly colored riding gear and a white or yellow helmet so those drivers who want to see you, can see you. And get the loudest set of exhaust pipes you can find!

 

Good luck out there!

 

racer

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On October 25, 1993, I was hit on my GPz750 by a car that turned left across my lane from the oncoming lane. To be precise, the car that was waiting to turn left from the oncoming lane, waited as I traveled about two hundred feet until I was right in front of him and then stepped on the gas head-on into my lane.

 

October 25, 1993, was the last day I ever rode a motorcycle on the street. I went on racing to put in the best races of my career over the next five years.

My understanding is this kind of thing happens often. What was the other driver's story? I can't understand how something like this would happen, yet you hear about it frequently. The answer always seems to be the driver just didn't see them.

 

It was pretty freaky. There is no doubt in my mind to this day that the guy hit me on purpose. I held eye contact with him as I approached the intersection. I looked away as I passed the point of no return and that is when he pulled out. The driver admitted on the scene that he saw me coming and claimed that "he didn't realize I was going so fast". *Cough, cough* ...Bull! I was traveling the speed limit and rolled off the gas as I approached the intersection. The fact is that I was going slowly and he got tired of waiting, and, most likely in a moment of frustration, decided to go for it at the last second. I watched the indecision on his face as I came down the hill toward the intersection. We've all been there. Waiting to turn across oncoming traffic. Should I go, should I wait, ah, f**k it!

 

I don't know for sure what was on his mind, but, there were, thankfully, many witnesses who supported my version of events to the police. I was so blown away by what the guy had done, I told the cops that they should give him a breathalizer test or take blood. I was sure he had to be high on something. For whatever reason, the cops decided not to give him any sobriety test. Perhaps he didn't show any outward signs of intoxication or smell of alcohol, but, his actions would seem to speak volumes about his state of mind.

 

As for what can be done, I think Kevin's idea is a good one. Anything that makes you more visible. I've already told you my solution. Nothing personal against anyone here, but, I won't even ride a public "track day" event or get on a hot track with anyone who doesn't have a racing license. And, even then, I come across riders who do stupid stuff or simply don't have the appropriate skill set and are, IMO, a danger to themselves and others. Honestly, with the increasing incidence and popularity of "open to the public" track days, I think there is a real need for "policing" these types of events by some sanctioning body. In other words, vetting riders with something more than just "slow group" / "fast group", and relying on a handful of control riders to keep an eye on things as they themselves are riding around. I don't know. Maybe I am being overly anal about safety in my old age. (Or maybe I almost lost my hand and did lose my ability to play the piano and violin with anything like the skill I once did. And, am now apparently suffering from advanced traumatic arthritis in my wrist, elbow and neck.)

 

In any case, there are people out there who hate us. Especially in the USA. They watch us split lanes through rush hour traffic at a dead stop on a six lane highway and it pisses them off. I've seen people open their car door to stop a motorcyclist splitting lanes in rush hour on the LIE in New York. Not very bright. Luckily the biker stopped in time. The point is, there really are freaking crazy people out there with anger or evil in their hearts. And if one of them gets a bead on you, there isn't a whole lot you can do except to avoid them. In the meantime, install a wig wag circuit like Kevin did and use lots of lights and reflective tape or paint and wear bightly colored riding gear and a white or yellow helmet so those drivers who want to see you, can see you. And get the loudest set of exhaust pipes you can find!

 

Good luck out there!

 

racer

Philosophically, I disagree with Kevin and Racer (sorry guys).

 

I'm a (gulp) street rider and (knock on wood) haven't had any true pucker moments except the ones I create. There was this one time in band camp...oh wrong story...

 

I'm of the opinion that it's the rider's responsibility to look out for his own safety. Lane positioning has a lot to do with it. When you see indecision in a driver's face, stay clear. Change lanes, etc...do anything you can to watch for them, becuase the eyes often see what the brain doesn't process.

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Philosophically, I disagree with Kevin and Racer (sorry guys).

 

I'm a (gulp) street rider and (knock on wood) haven't had any true pucker moments except the ones I create. There was this one time in band camp...oh wrong story...

 

I'm of the opinion that it's the rider's responsibility to look out for his own safety. Lane positioning has a lot to do with it. When you see indecision in a driver's face, stay clear. Change lanes, etc...do anything you can to watch for them, becuase the eyes often see what the brain doesn't process.

 

Actually, I completely agree with your "philosophy", Jay. And I don't see how it conflicts with anything Kevin or I have said.

 

In any case, at the end of the day, "taking reponsibility" for looking out for yourself, aside from being simple common sense logic, is no guarantee of safety or "solution" to anything.

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Philosophically, I disagree with Kevin and Racer (sorry guys).

I'm of the opinion that it's the rider's responsibility to look out for his own safety. Lane positioning has a lot to do with it. When you see indecision in a driver's face, stay clear. Change lanes, etc...do anything you can to watch for them, becuase the eyes often see what the brain doesn't process.

Jay;

 

I apprecite that you disagree with us but I missed how in your response. I can tell you from first person experience that when a car runs a stop sign through a two way (as opposed to a four way) intersection, if you were asuming that the car would respect the sign, you WILL t-bone him. I have, even with fairly quick reaction skills; fortunately for me, I was driving a car with excellent disc brakes but there simply wasn't enough road left for me to stop or to avoid him; if I was on a bike, I wouldn't be here now.

 

You may think you can control your environment but I respectfully disagree with you on that point.

 

Kevin

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Philosophically, I disagree with Kevin and Racer (sorry guys).

I'm of the opinion that it's the rider's responsibility to look out for his own safety. Lane positioning has a lot to do with it. When you see indecision in a driver's face, stay clear. Change lanes, etc...do anything you can to watch for them, becuase the eyes often see what the brain doesn't process.

Jay;

 

I apprecite that you disagree with us but I missed how in your response. I can tell you from first person experience that when a car runs a stop sign through a two way (as opposed to a four way) intersection, if you were asuming that the car would respect the sign, you WILL t-bone him. I have, even with fairly quick reaction skills; fortunately for me, I was driving a car with excellent disc brakes but there simply wasn't enough road left for me to stop or to avoid him; if I was on a bike, I wouldn't be here now.

 

You may think you can control your environment but I respectfully disagree with you on that point.

 

Kevin

I control what I can and leave everything else to HIM whom my prayers go. HE has empowered me to control much but not all.

 

Earlier I was emphasizing the wrongful mindset of the experienced riders giving friendly advice regarding reflective clothing, loud exhaust, hi beams, etc to n00bs on how to be safe. This lulls them into a false sense of security and they get lax thinking 'I know they can see/hear me now'.

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Philosophically, I disagree with Kevin and Racer (sorry guys).

I'm of the opinion that it's the rider's responsibility to look out for his own safety. Lane positioning has a lot to do with it. When you see indecision in a driver's face, stay clear. Change lanes, etc...do anything you can to watch for them, becuase the eyes often see what the brain doesn't process.

Jay;

 

I apprecite that you disagree with us but I missed how in your response. I can tell you from first person experience that when a car runs a stop sign through a two way (as opposed to a four way) intersection, if you were assuming that the car would respect the sign, you WILL t-bone him. I have, even with fairly quick reaction skills; fortunately for me, I was driving a car with excellent disc brakes but there simply wasn't enough road left for me to stop or to avoid him; if I was on a bike, I wouldn't be here now.

 

You may think you can control your environment but I respectfully disagree with you on that point.

 

Kevin

I control what I can and leave everything else to HIM whom my prayers go. HE has empowered me to control much but not all.

 

Earlier I was emphasizing the wrongful mindset of the experienced riders giving friendly advice regarding reflective clothing, loud exhaust, hi beams, etc to n00bs on how to be safe. This lulls them into a false sense of security and they get lax thinking 'I know they can see/hear me now'.

Jay;

I respect your faith and I am not going to touch that here. I do want to respond to your comment however about "experienced riders giving friendly advice".

Believe me when I tell you I get tight as a drum every time I approach an intersection with an on-coming car or see a car coming out of a parking lot...the only time I can slightly relax is on an open country road and then I am watching for critters, farm vehicles, bad pavement or other "hazzards". I by no means ever suggested that we drop our guards down...never. The list that you included in your last post are simple "additions" to what we need to make us saf(er) on public roads but we will always be at risk. My original response was to the question of why drivers frequently make left turns in front of motorcyclists and my response came from a highway study related to motorcycling accidents and no, I cannot remember its name or who conducted it.

 

Just because some here may have a number of years riding experience, it doesn't change the perils that face all of us on every road, every day everywhere. The training I have received from the California Superbike School has been invaluable in preparing me in ways to avoid collisions but I still worry every time I go out. You may also find that many here (like Racer) only ride motorcycles on the track because it is the only place where they feel like the odds are in their favor and to a large extent, I agree with him on that. YRMV.

 

Kevin

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No matter what you do, and how good a rider you are, there is always risk for a car to pull out in front of you. You can be the best rider, and have more faith than anyone in a 500 mile radius, but someone not paying attention, on the cell phone, pissed about something, or in a rush is going to run smack into you, and there will be no way to avoid it. Car drivers sometimes don't pay enough attention to register motorcycles, and I'm sorry I can't find it on the internet, but there have been studies proving this. Arizona, when I compare it to any other state (4 is how many I've ridden in over a year each) is the best at paying attention to motorcyclists, but the snowbirds come along, and it can get pretty hairy.

I can't tell you how many times a month I get flipped off, but I'll lay on my horn if I even THINK someone isn't going to stop at a turn to yield the right of way to me, or think they might not see me. I'm very skilled at whacking high/low beams, and will do that in the morning if I see the roads are empty, or there are no cars to "hide" behind. I pay conscious attention to danger and death zones, and still have cars wanting to pull in front of me.

Look at how auto accidents happen. It's not like they shouldn't be able to see cars stopped in front of them, a red light, oncoming traffic, but they don't sometimes, and when it happens to a motorcyclist, the results are horrible. We can only do what we do. We're narrow, fast accelerating, sometimes neutral colored machines that are always at risk. If it is going to happen, there is no way to avoid it.

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Jay;

I respect your faith and I am not going to touch that here. I do want to respond to your comment however about "experienced riders giving friendly advice".

Believe me when I tell you I get tight as a drum every time I approach an intersection with an on-coming car or see a car coming out of a parking lot...the only time I can slightly relax is on an open country road and then I am watching for critters, farm vehicles, bad pavement or other "hazzards". I by no means ever suggested that we drop our guards down...never. The list that you included in your last post are simple "additions" to what we need to make us saf(er) on public roads but we will always be at risk. My original response was to the question of why drivers frequently make left turns in front of motorcyclists and my response came from a highway study related to motorcycling accidents and no, I cannot remember its name or who conducted it.

 

Just because some here may have a number of years riding experience, it doesn't change the perils that face all of us on every road, every day everywhere. The training I have received from the California Superbike School has been invaluable in preparing me in ways to avoid collisions but I still worry every time I go out. You may also find that many here (like Racer) only ride motorcycles on the track because it is the only place where they feel like the odds are in their favor and to a large extent, I agree with him on that. YRMV.

 

Kevin

 

Kevin

Kevin,

You may include me in the group that thinks daily about going track only. I am grateful EVERY TIME I return home safely with myself and my bike in 1 piece (and even the times my bike wasn't in 1 piece). But I've accepted that one day, I just MAY NOT return home. I pray that I live to be an old/grey rider, but the only part that I can control is my choices. Yes, my risk of injury is higher than driving my car with all it's stability/ traction control, ABS, airbags, crumple zones, yada yada, but this is something that I've CHOSEN. As Master Yoda said, "Do or do not" and all risk can be managed, but we have to accept that we cannot eliminate it altogether; and I think we all know that.

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Oh boy, that is horrible.

I was just reading his Suspension book last night and admiring the photo of him rocking his copper SV Cup bike.

I hope he heals up okay.

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Cards and letters can be mailed to:

 

Andrew Trevitt

Sport Rider

6420 Wilshire Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90048

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Found this posted on the WERA forum.

 

I did receive an update today. It appears there is a sliver of hope but realisticly, Andrew will most likely remain a paraplegic for the remainder of his life. From what I hear, the doctors say it is possble he may get some feeling in his lower extremedies but not very likely.

 

I also understand there will be a donation site set up soon. I'll post up the address as soon as it's available. Lord knows Andrews medical bills will most likely exceed a small country's GNP.

 

The accident itself is described as follows:

 

Andrew and his co-writer with SR magizine (Kent Kunitsugu) was riding together with Kent in the lead. They were following a car with a single occupant who it appears met one of his buddies going the opposite direction. The driver waved out the window at his passing friend and imediately pulled to the shoulder of the road and whipped a u-turn. Kent was able to dodge the vehicle but Andrew was hit broadside and ran over by the car. The driver of the vehicle turned out to be a 15 year old male. Yes 15, it's not a typo error.

 

Andrew is busted up pretty badly. He has broken bones in his face as well as back and pelvis damage. He has lots of swelling in his back. The doctors say they expect/hope he gets the feeling back in his legs with time.

 

 

Warning - this was taken from a web-forum, it is therefore not completely credible:

http://www.hayabusa.org/forum/genera...went-down.html

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There's really not much info on the SR site but there is an email address listed to send Andrew a message ( getwelltrev@yahoo.com ) in an "update" they have posted. I just emailed him as his writing really did inspire me to try riding on a track after I read his story on racing in the SV Cup. Update here> http://www.sportrider.com/news/146_0811_an...date/index.html This is the article he wrote that got me hooked. > http://www.sportrider.com/features/146_040..._cup/index.html

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Mr Trevitt replied to my email. He has a blog at www.getwelltrev.blogspot.com.

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It's really sad to read all of these posts as well as hearing the news of Andrew Trevitt, I sincerely hope his health improves and the feeling in his legs returns. I've never been as badly injured as that, but I still fully appreciate the feelings you get when you overhear "mid twenties male with possible paralysis, broken ankles, multiple broken ribs, awaiting kidney tests". Not very subtle those doctor types. Anyway, I wish him the best and if I see a valid link, I'll certainly contribute something. I appreciate that in America, health costs are extremely high.

 

I just thought I'd post a link to this yahoo answers question I wrote relatively recently, might be of interest...there again, you might not give a jot!

 

http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index...21014413AAaFiRN

 

I was riding with a group of friends when someone did an unobserved U-turn in the road, the lead rider braked incredibly hard and she avoided the collision. It's sad to think anger takes over when a close friend is nearly toasted. We surrounded the car and frightened the occupant quite badly, I just hope it had a positive outcome and that same car driver checks their mirrors from now on.

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